Tag Archives: Chanukah

Happy Thanksgivukkah, Y’all!

There’s a lot we’re thankful for at the Institute of Southern Jewish Life. We are thankful for the work we get to do. We are thankful for the wonderful region in which we get to do it. We are thankful for partners like MyJewishLearning.com that help us connect with even more of you throughout the year. The list goes on and on – and throughout Chanukah, we’ll be adding candles to our menurkey to shine the light on our thanksgiving:

Night-1--Community

Tonight, we light the first candle for COMMUNITY. Like us on Facebook to keep up with our candles all this week, and tonight let us wish you a very HAPPY CHANUKAH, HAPPY THANKSGIVING, and yes, for once-and-only-once tomorrow: HAPPY THANKSGIVUKKAH!

Posted on November 27, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

The 4 Questions of Thanksgiving

As I get ready for my Southern family’s traditional Thanksgiving celebration, which this year will overlap our celebration of Hanukkah… well, there’s been all this talk of “Thanksgivukkah,” but right now it’s the annual menu that’s on my mind.

Thinking about all the foods we eat, and how this night too is “different from all other nights,” I realized this holiday needs its own four questions:

1) On all other nights, we eat only one carbohydrate. Why on this night do we have sweet potato casserole with a gooey marshmallow topping, mashed potatoes, bread, cornbread dressing, stuffing, and rolls (oh, those many, many delicious dinner rolls)?

2) On all other nights we eat raw, steamed or sautéed vegetables. Why on this night do we serve our green beans in a casserole that loses nutritional value with a can of cream soup and crunchy onion rings on top?

tableturkey

3) On all other nights, we don’t dip our chicken, turkey or meat in gravy. Why on this night do we generously smother everything in gravy?

4) On all other nights, we eat sitting upright.  Why on this night do we eat and eat and eat, then eat some pie and recline in front of a football game?

Of course, this year, in addition to the regular old Four Questions of Thanksgiving, we have another one: On all other Thanksgivings, we don’t light a menorah. Why on this night…

Well – that one has a really clear answer, at least.

As for the others, well, the holiday in the United States began as a feast and giving thanks for a good harvest. Today, the holiday has become about families gathering around a table and giving thanks for being together – which isn’t an excuse for the overly-decadent food.

So there may not be a truly satisfying answer to each of the 4 Questions of Thanksgiving, but the overall answer is that we do it to celebrate with our families, enjoying what we have and hopefully also remembering those in need and sharing in the bounty.

And as for all the carbs and calories, well… it’s only once a year, right?

Posted on November 26, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Chanukah Gifts You’ll Feel Good Giving

Last week, I spent an incredible three days at a conference with lots of Jewish social justice professionals, activists and advocates. The timing of the event was perfect for Hanukkah … and here’s why!

GeltFeature

Convened by the Jewish Social Justice Roundtable, at the conference I met lots of incredible people doing very inspiring work. Resources were shared and important conversations continued. Helping to make the world a better place is truly a gift, and while we were on the subject of gifts and only days from Hanukkah, I wanted to share one resource I learned about, the one that is just perfect for the holiday season: Fair Trade Judaica, gifts “crafted with Jewish values.”

Fair Trade Judaica has lots of incredible Jewish gifts, and the great thing is that they are all Fair Trade Products! From guilt-free gelt to hand-dipped candles, I was inspired and reminded that where we buy, matters. This holiday season, as we give gifts to our loved ones, a wonderful way to recall the literal meaning of the word Hanukkah, “dedication,” is to re-dedicate ourselves to all the ways in which we can further justice and make life better for all.

You can also find great gift ideas from MyJewishLearning.com (including Southern & Jewish items) and support all the learning, information, ideas, and resources you find here on this site. That’s a double-gift, as well—something for your loved ones, purchased in a way that supports something you appreciate year-round.

Where you spend your money matters. Each of us has an opportunity to make a difference with every purchase. Happy Hanukkah, y’all!

Posted on November 25, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

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