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The 4 Questions of Thanksgiving

As I get ready for my Southern family’s traditional Thanksgiving celebration, which this year will overlap our celebration of Hanukkah… well, there’s been all this talk of “Thanksgivukkah,” but right now it’s the annual menu that’s on my mind.

Thinking about all the foods we eat, and how this night too is “different from all other nights,” I realized this holiday needs its own four questions:

1) On all other nights, we eat only one carbohydrate. Why on this night do we have sweet potato casserole with a gooey marshmallow topping, mashed potatoes, bread, cornbread dressing, stuffing, and rolls (oh, those many, many delicious dinner rolls)?

2) On all other nights we eat raw, steamed or sautéed vegetables. Why on this night do we serve our green beans in a casserole that loses nutritional value with a can of cream soup and crunchy onion rings on top?

tableturkey

3) On all other nights, we don’t dip our chicken, turkey or meat in gravy. Why on this night do we generously smother everything in gravy?

4) On all other nights, we eat sitting upright.  Why on this night do we eat and eat and eat, then eat some pie and recline in front of a football game?

Of course, this year, in addition to the regular old Four Questions of Thanksgiving, we have another one: On all other Thanksgivings, we don’t light a menorah. Why on this night…

Well – that one has a really clear answer, at least.

As for the others, well, the holiday in the United States began as a feast and giving thanks for a good harvest. Today, the holiday has become about families gathering around a table and giving thanks for being together – which isn’t an excuse for the overly-decadent food.

So there may not be a truly satisfying answer to each of the 4 Questions of Thanksgiving, but the overall answer is that we do it to celebrate with our families, enjoying what we have and hopefully also remembering those in need and sharing in the bounty.

And as for all the carbs and calories, well… it’s only once a year, right?

Posted on November 26, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Chanukah Gifts You’ll Feel Good Giving

Last week, I spent an incredible three days at a conference with lots of Jewish social justice professionals, activists and advocates. The timing of the event was perfect for Hanukkah … and here’s why!

GeltFeature

Convened by the Jewish Social Justice Roundtable, at the conference I met lots of incredible people doing very inspiring work. Resources were shared and important conversations continued. Helping to make the world a better place is truly a gift, and while we were on the subject of gifts and only days from Hanukkah, I wanted to share one resource I learned about, the one that is just perfect for the holiday season: Fair Trade Judaica, gifts “crafted with Jewish values.”

Fair Trade Judaica has lots of incredible Jewish gifts, and the great thing is that they are all Fair Trade Products! From guilt-free gelt to hand-dipped candles, I was inspired and reminded that where we buy, matters. This holiday season, as we give gifts to our loved ones, a wonderful way to recall the literal meaning of the word Hanukkah, “dedication,” is to re-dedicate ourselves to all the ways in which we can further justice and make life better for all.

You can also find great gift ideas from MyJewishLearning.com (including Southern & Jewish items) and support all the learning, information, ideas, and resources you find here on this site. That’s a double-gift, as well—something for your loved ones, purchased in a way that supports something you appreciate year-round.

Where you spend your money matters. Each of us has an opportunity to make a difference with every purchase. Happy Hanukkah, y’all!

Posted on November 25, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Shalom & Bon Voyage, Y’all

In the mid-nineteenth century, thousands of Jewish immigrants from Alsace-Lorraine came to America and made new lives for themselves in the Deep South. Last week, some Alsatian Jews embarked on the same journey (made much more convenient by intercontinental air travel) to learn about Jewish history and heritage in the South.

Traveling up from New Orleans, last Friday this group of 33 Jewish Alsatian tourists found themselves spending a day with ISJL staff in Jackson, Mississippi. We have worked with tour groups in the past, but never in a different language! While many of them did speak English, the group leader translated every presentation into French. Take a look at this short clip I filmed of Dr. Rockoff presenting to the group…

From our office we went on our usual tour of Jackson sites, stopping at Tougaloo College, the COFO Civil Rights Education Center and the Medgar Evers House Museum. These sites mainly focus on the events of the Civil Rights movement, so I did my best to explain how that history has shaped this region. Questions like why so many buildings were empty downtown, why students pay so much for a college education, and inquiries regarding contemporary race relations, covered huge topics that while difficult to explain easily in English, are especially challenging to explain in French, to an audience without a native understanding of American history.

Our group in the Woodworth Chapel at Tougaloo College

The cultural exchange went both ways, as I got to hear about the French Jewish experience as well. One woman asked me about how Southerners practice Judaism, and if they still identify as Jewish if they aren’t active in a congregation. She explained that while there are many secular Jews in France, many strongly identify as racially Jewish because of their direct connection to the Holocaust. The leader told me later that a few of the visitors were hidden children during the war. I also found it interesting in discussing our ISJL education program when a few of the guests then explained to me that their children never had any formal Jewish schooling; they simply learned Jewish practices and customs in the home.

medgar evers

Speaking with curator Minnie Watson at the Medgar Evers Home

It was a great learning experience and such a wonderful opportunity to spend the day with this group. We’re happy that they chose to spend their time in our neck of the woods and I hope this post will encourage some of you with fewer oceans to travel across to make plans to join us soon for your own Southern Jewish experience!

COFO

Group photo at the COFO Education Center

Posted on November 18, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

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