Category Archives: Holidays

New Year’s Day Lucky Foods: Southern… And Jewish?!

Image source: Wikimedia Commons

Image source: Wikimedia Commons

I never thought of the traditional Southern dishes eaten for luck at the New Year as particularly Jewish– certainly not “Jewish-traditionally” speaking, since the greens and black-eyed peas often have big ol’ pieces of pig floating around.

So I was surprised to recently learn in a Serious Eats article that the origin stories behind these lucky foods are pretty diverse… and there are even Talmudic connections to the black-eyed peas. The fortune-fused dish may be Sephardic as well as Southern, African, marinated in more lore and cultural-cooking-connections than we would have guessed.

This year, I let New Year’s Day get by me without being home long enough to cook up any of the traditional luck-bringing dishes I’ve made in years past. Now that I know a little bit more about them, I think I’ll make some of those lucky peas… and just chalk it up to ringing the New Year in on “Jewish time.”

In case you want to do the same, try your luck with this this vegetarian/kosher-friendly recipe for delicious black eyed peas. Happy New Year, y’all!

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Posted on January 6, 2015

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Welcome 2015 with a Sweet (Potato Challah) Shabbat Treat!

sweet-potato1Happy 2015! This year starts on a Thursday, which means the first Shabbat of 2015 is only a day away! Start the new year off on a sweet note with our Sweet Potato Challah recipe. It sets just the right tone for a year of sweet Sabbaths.

sweet-potato-challah-full

Ingredients
1 package (7g) yeast
2/3 c. warm water
1 tsp. ground cinnamon
½ tsps. ground cardamom
3¾ c. unbleached white flour (substitute up to 1¾ c. whole wheat flour)
1/3 c. sugar
½ c. mashed sweet potato
¼ c. canola oil
2 eggs (1 is for glaze)
1½ tsps. salt
½ tbsp. honey

Directions
Sprinkle yeast into small bowl and pour in warm water. Let stand for 10 min; stir to dissolve.
Mix flour, ½ tsp. cinnamon, & cardamom in large bowl.
Make a well in the center, pour in yeast/water mixture.
In a separate bowl, whisk together sugar, sweet potato, oil, egg, & salt. Add to the flour mixture. Combine thoroughly.
Turn dough out on lightly floured surface. Knead for 5- 10 minutes until dough is pliable. Let dough rest 2-3 minutes; lightly oil bowl, place dough in bowl, cover with towel.
Let dough rise until it has tripled in size (2- 3 hours).
Punch down dough, knead; cut into 2 equal pieces. Cut the 2 pieces into 3 equal pieces (6 total); braid two even loaves. Line baking sheets with foil or parchment paper.
In a small cup, mix 1/2 an egg with ½ tsp cinnamon and honey to make the glaze. Coat challot with the glaze.
Place loaves on sheets, cover, and let rise until doubled in size; remove cover and bake for 30 minutes at 375 degrees.

Find more great Southern & Jewish recipes like this one in Taste of Torah: A Little Nosh of D’rash!

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Posted on January 1, 2015

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Once A Fellow, Always a Fellow

Recently, I was sitting in my office listening to a Hanukkah mix on Spotify (one of the many reasons that I know that I will always, always be a Jewish professional). A song came on that immediately transported me to the back-roads of the Mississippi Delta: Neal Katz’s “Be A Light.”

fellows

Full of light and laughter!

The Neal Katz “Be a Light: Chanukah Songs for Grown-Ups” CD graced the middle console of the ISJL van when I was an Education Fellow (2010-2012). I often listened to it on long drives, regardless of the season. Seriously, have I mentioned I am destined to forever be a Jewish professional? The chorus begins: “Be a light, be a light / Shine proudly and loudly in the dark of the night.”

Humming this song, which I had listened to approximately 22 times as the holiday approached, I rang in Hanukkah with a Google Hangout. I set up my menorah, and placed it in front a computer screen. This doesn’t sound very intimate or personal, but let me explain.

For the last three years, my cohort of 2010-2012 ISJL Education Fellow alumni has spent one night of Hanukkah virtually together. I invite them to a video chat, and from three different time zones, we kindle the lights, singing the blessings down South, up North, all over. It’s certainly a “Shehechiyanu moment,” if there ever was one.

This year we had a special guest in our virtual midst—ISJL Education Director Rachel Stern, our old boss. We all spent over an hour talking and laughing and reminiscing about our collective time together. When we hung up, close to 11:00pm EST, we agreed that we would have to try and gather on our computer screens every Jewish holiday. And I know that it will really happen.

This virtual candle lighting—a symbol of unity, of community, of family—is a tradition that I can see continuing forever. The ISJL Education Fellowship fosters and nurtures continued relationships like these. Friendships that sustain themselves long after we go on our last community visit. I never could have imagined the power and the importance of these friendships in my life, of these Fellows in my family. Lighting the candles together once a year is a gift that I cherish, a gift that constantly reminds me of how lucky we are, and how brightly and proudly we shine our Fellow lights.

The hashtag #OnceAFellowAlwaysAFellow has become a joke among all Fellows. You use it whenever something magical and ridiculous converges, or when you have a Fellow reunion, or when you listen to things like “Be A Light” on repeat in your office. It started as something that was just sort of a joke, but as our candle lighting tradition reminds us, it’s not really a joke—it’s true.

Once a Fellow, Always a Fellow.

For that, I am thankful—this Hanukkah, and every Hanukkah to come.

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Posted on December 23, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy