Author Archives: Michele Schipper

Michele Schipper

About Michele Schipper

Michele Schipper is the Chief Operating Officer of the ISJL.

Synagogues: Also Ask “How?”

I read with interest and appreciation Ben Greenberg’s recent post “Synagogues: Begin with Why.” Lately, I’ve been thinking about the same phrase, but substituting the “Why” with “How.”

Volunteers at the author's congregation, during the annual Bazaar

Volunteers at the author’s congregation, during the annual Bazaar, which draws hundreds of attendees from the entire Mississippi community

I’m currently serving on the rabbinic search committee for my small Jewish congregation in Jackson, Mississippi. This process has compelled us to take a critical look at ourselves. The membership and leadership of the congregation has been asking a lot of questions. We are reflecting about what our congregation is, why our congregation exists, and how everything we do gets accomplished. What are the qualities we think are most important for our rabbi, as spiritual leader and perhaps executive director, to lead the one synagogue in our Bible Belt town? And what will make a rabbi want to bring his or her life into our community?

We are the only congregation in Jackson. Being the only game in town means there is no “shul shopping” to find the perfect fit for one’s family. The congregation must be the one-size-fits-all answer to everyone who lives here. This leads me back to the “how”. How can one congregation, with a very small staff, serve the needs of a diverse membership of 215 family units?

The answer does not begin or end with finding the right rabbinic candidate. The “how” has to involve everyone – all of our congregants who make this temple their home congregation.

All of our members must contribute, and I’m not just talking about money (although that’s vital to keeping the lights on). All must contribute time. All must invest in the feeling of community. Whether welcoming those who come to worship, teaching a class, planning a program, visiting the sick, answering phones, helping with office work, landscaping, preparing a holiday meal, organizing meaningful activities with the larger community… the list goes on and on. No one will do this for us, and no one should. We get out of synagogue life what we put into it. Without us, there is no “how.”

And then I think about some of the challenges of the smallest synagogues—those with 50 members or fewer. There are congregations where every member has a key to the building—because they are all responsible; members take turns ensuring there is wine and grape juice for Kiddush, and even purchasing the toilet tissue for the restroom. Many of these communities can no longer afford to have a full time rabbi, so their “how” is that everyone must contribute resources, expertise and time to make their synagogue a spiritual home, a place where everyone is welcome.

That is the challenge for us in smaller communities, but it is also our strength. It is what will make the right rabbinic candidate feel at home here, because they will be welcomed and meaningfully put to work—as are all our active members.

Synagogues: Begin with “why,” yes, absolutely. But we will only continue and be sustained, year after year, by all of us asking (and answering) “how.”

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Posted on December 16, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

With Love for Mr. Awesome

MR-AWESOME-POSTERThe relationships that are forged at Jewish summer camp last forever. As a URJ Jacobs Camp camper, staff member, and camper-parent for many years, I’ve enjoyed using Facebook to reconnect with those that I spent so many great summers. However, last week, there was an outpouring of shock, heartache and love as an old camp friend/former Jacobs camper Carla Kaufman Sloan posted the following:

As some of you know we lost our awesome, big-hearted, and brilliant oldest son Calder on Sunday in a tragic and bizarre accident.

What do you say to anyone who has lost a child, a week after his 7th birthday? How do you console his mom, dad, younger brother and countless friends and relatives as Calder touched so many in his short life? In this case, some gentle guidance came from the family, and their friends, and even their son.

After the family began a fund in Calder Sloan’s memory, a friend of the family began a social media campaign with this self portrait that Calder had created just a few months ago. Thus began the “Mr. Awesome” campaign.

So here it is, with great love and respect, the staff of the Goldring/Woldenberg Institute of Southern Jewish Life, remembering the joy that Calder Sloan, “Mr. Awesome,” brought into the world during his short time here. We send loving and caring thoughts to Carla, Chris, and Caleb Sloan.

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Here’s to Adventure. Laughter. Kindness. All in honor of Mr. Awesome.

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Posted on April 25, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

The 4 Questions of Thanksgiving

As I get ready for my Southern family’s traditional Thanksgiving celebration, which this year will overlap our celebration of Hanukkah… well, there’s been all this talk of “Thanksgivukkah,” but right now it’s the annual menu that’s on my mind.

Thinking about all the foods we eat, and how this night too is “different from all other nights,” I realized this holiday needs its own four questions:

1) On all other nights, we eat only one carbohydrate. Why on this night do we have sweet potato casserole with a gooey marshmallow topping, mashed potatoes, bread, cornbread dressing, stuffing, and rolls (oh, those many, many delicious dinner rolls)?

2) On all other nights we eat raw, steamed or sautéed vegetables. Why on this night do we serve our green beans in a casserole that loses nutritional value with a can of cream soup and crunchy onion rings on top?

tableturkey

3) On all other nights, we don’t dip our chicken, turkey or meat in gravy. Why on this night do we generously smother everything in gravy?

4) On all other nights, we eat sitting upright.  Why on this night do we eat and eat and eat, then eat some pie and recline in front of a football game?

Of course, this year, in addition to the regular old Four Questions of Thanksgiving, we have another one: On all other Thanksgivings, we don’t light a menorah. Why on this night…

Well – that one has a really clear answer, at least.

As for the others, well, the holiday in the United States began as a feast and giving thanks for a good harvest. Today, the holiday has become about families gathering around a table and giving thanks for being together – which isn’t an excuse for the overly-decadent food.

So there may not be a truly satisfying answer to each of the 4 Questions of Thanksgiving, but the overall answer is that we do it to celebrate with our families, enjoying what we have and hopefully also remembering those in need and sharing in the bounty.

And as for all the carbs and calories, well… it’s only once a year, right?

Posted on November 26, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy