From the Collection: High Water

As stated in one of our last posts about the hurricane, we are familiar with what the devastation of hurricanes looks like in the South. But the recent photographs of flooded cities coming out of New York and New Jersey during the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy  remind me of other stunning photos captured during a massive flood in this region that goes back further than Katrina or Camille.

Streets of Greenwood, MS during the 1927 Flood

 

These images are from a collection of photos and documents that once belonged to Marshall Levitt of Greenwood, MS. They depict the Flood of 1927, a devastating flood on April 21st , caused by a weather system that brought huge amounts of rain to the Upper Mississippi River Region and resulted in the levees breaking. It caused water to cover nearly one million acres of the Mississippi Delta, ten feet deep in ten days, and covered much of the area for months.

While Greenville, MS infamously suffered the worst of the flood, the expansive impact of the water can be seen in these photos which were taken over 50 miles away to the east of the river in Greenwood, MS.

At the time, The Mississippi River Flood of 1927 was the nation’s greatest natural disaster,  affecting an estimated population of 185,495.  Clearly, the scope of Hurricane Sandy’s damage is much larger. I hope for my friends and family in the Northeast that years from now, after a successful recovery, the photos captured from this  storm will seem just as unbelievable as these from Greenwood do today.

Posted on November 9, 2012

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