Monthly Archives: October 2012

Interfaith, Outreach, Inclusion … Why Bother?

We hear a lot about “interfaith” and “outreach” programming. In fact, I spend a lot of my time promoting it. But why does it matter? If it might lead to some difficult conversations and such – why bother?

Well, my experiences not only as a director of programming, but also as a proud New Orleans native, have shaped my understanding of the value and vital need for these sorts of efforts.

“….Temple Sinai is a house of prayer for all people and all who enter our doors in the spirit of brotherhood and sisterhood are always welcome and that includes the members of Greater St. Stephens Ministries.”

These words were spoken by Rabbi Edward Cohn. Since becoming the Rabbi of Temple Sinai in New Orleans 25 years ago, Rabbi Cohn has made interfaith and outreach programming a priority for the congregation.  His efforts have led to a strong New Orleans Interfaith clergy group which meets on a regular basis to discuss theological, ethical and political issues as well as forming strong bonds of friendship which have served all of these congregations well.  Often times, our opinions or convictions may conflict, but there is always respect and love.  In times of celebration and in times of tragedy, these congregations have stood with each other side by side.

In fact, when the Greater St. Stephens Baptist Church burned down, Rabbi Cohn reached out to Bishop Paul Morton and Senior Pastor Debra Morton and offered the Temple Sinai sanctuary as a … sanctuary!

St. Stephens at Sinai

I attended several of the services to see what it was like while the St. Stephens congregation was worshiping in my synagogue. Sitting in the back of that 1,100 seat-sanctuary (completely filled twice each Sunday while they were there), I was blown away by the full Gospel choir and the spirit.  Whatever your faith, God was in that place, and I knew it.

That’s why interfaith and outreach programming matters. Because in times of triumph, and in times of trial, it enables us to be better neighbors and experience modern miracles … like when the trial becomes the triumph, and two communities can share one sacred space.

What has been your very best interfaith experience?

 

Posted on October 31, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Make A Difference Day!

October 27th was national “Make a Difference Day.” This piece was written by Gernelle Nelson, the ISJL’s AmeriCorps member.

Taking a leadership role in Make a Difference Day is one of my duties as an AmeriCorps volunteer. I wanted to coordinate something really meaningful. While there are lots of ways to make a difference, this year, I encouraged our office to focus on making a difference for sick children in the hospital. Being in the hospital can be a scary and lonely experience for a child. Some young children have to be away from family and friends for weeks as they recover, and this can bring feelings of sadness and restlessness. We wanted to help them focus on learning and having fun despite their current conditions.

AmeriCorps Member Gernelle Nelson at her ISJL desk

So we collected activity books, stickers and art supplies. Several of us even made handmade cards to show that we care. Within a week, we had over 80 cards, 30 activity books and 20 sets of crayons, markers and colored pencils. Along with one of the ISJL’s Education Fellows, Sam Kahan, I went and delivered the donations in person to the Batson Children’s Hospital. It was a wonderful way to truly make a difference for those children, hopefully brightening their day and reminding them that their community cares.

Even though Make a Difference Day has passed, it’s never too late to dedicate time, energy and other resources to improve our world. Did you participate in Make A Difference Day?

 

Posted on October 29, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

From the Collection: “What My Lady Should Not Wear”

There are moments as an archivist when something unusual (like a fur muff or a military notebook) sticks out from a standard inventory of confirmation photos and store ledgers. And then, sometimes, you come across a group shot of men in drag.

"What My Lady Should Not Wear"

No, this photo from is not from the Greenwood, Mississippi production of La Cage Aux Folles (written by Jewish composer Jerry Herman, who just so happens to be my first cousin twice removed!). That show wasn’t written until 1983, which puts these men way ahead of their time.

I couldn't write a better caption than the original. "Paris may have the Champs Elyses, but Greenwood now has the reputation of being the style center of the world."

The photo was featured in a newsletter put out by the  B’nai B’rith District Grand Lodge No. 7 in 1951.  While Jews were active members of local clubs like the Masons or Shriners, exclusively Jewish groups like B’nai B’rith were very important to the continuity of the Southern Jewish identity. Many families that worked and lived in smaller towns traveled to  larger cities like Greenwood for Jewish communal life. Potlucks and holiday parties were where they could network, discuss business, and, most importantly, find dates!

The event title alone, “What My Lady Should Not Wear,” gives the impression that this brotherhood of men knew how to get a laugh and certainly shakes any preconceived notions I may have had about  conservative Southern men. I just hope they got to keep the outfits.

Posted on October 26, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Privacy Policy