Monthly Archives: September 2012

High Holy Days: Collective Sin, Collective Success

Within the liturgy of Yom Kippur, guilt is assumed to be collective, as we communally recite the sins. That being the case, then it is also appropriate – at this time of reflection and renewal – to acknowledge communally our triumphs and successes, as these efforts to sustain and strengthen Jewish identities and Jewish values too could not have been possible without the collective efforts of each and every one of us. Therefore, I offer the following prayer of supplication and thanksgiving for our collective success:

For the good we have done when fully aware,

And, for the good we have done even when unaware;

For the good we have done quite publically,

And, for the good we have done anonymously;

For the good we have done by using gentle comforting words,

And, for the good we have done using strong encouraging words;

For the good we have done by sticking to our principles,

And, for the good we have done through compromising them;

For the good we have done in random acts of kindness,

And, for the good we have done in not-so-random acts of kindness;

For the good we have done through passive non-violence,

And, for the good we have done through active confrontations of truth;

For the good we have done in the light of our successes,

And, for the good we have done even in our failures;

V’al kulam, Elohai ezra-ot, azor lanu, s’mach lanu, chazeik lanu,

For all these things, O’ God of our Help, aid us, support us, strengthen us.

In our work here at the ISJL, our partnerships with congregations throughout the South yield shared triumphs every single day. May this sacred cooperation continue, here in the South and throughout the Jewish world. For surely then we can say with great humility and appreciation to our Source of life and strength that while 5772 was remarkable, 5773 will be even better. L’shanah tovah, y’all!

What blessings are you giving thanks for during these 10 Days of Awe?

Note: Last year, I attended a CCAR webinar called “Prayformance and Prayticipation.” In it, Cantor Ellen Dreskin presented a positive approach to our Days of Awe, which inspired me to craft this piece.

Posted on September 21, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Streaming Judaism: Dreams to Deeds Podcast Debuts

A few weeks ago, Rachel Stern wrote about the real blessings technology can bring, particularly when you’re outside of a major metropolitan area and want to connect to Jewish life.

This holiday season, we’re excited for another resource that will be streaming our way. This one takes the form of a new and ongoing podcast series, demonstrating the power of passionate teaching by preeminent Jewish educators. It’s a project of The Covenant Foundation, broadcast by JCast Network.

Marking the Jewish New Year, the series – From Dreams to Deeds: Join the Journey – debuts with Dr. Erica Brown, a 2009 Covenant Award recipient and Scholar-in-Residence at The Jewish Federation of Greater Washington. Upcoming podcasts will feature Jewish educators influential in their own communities and nationally – in the realms of Jewish education, religious thought, community building and generational continuity.

Podcasts will feature, among others, Rivy Poupko Kletenik, Head of School at Seattle Hebrew Academy and author of a monthly Jewish advice column; Rabbi Yakov Horowitz, Dean of Yeshiva Darchei Noam in Monsey, NY, Founder and Director of Project Y.E.S., and a prolific writer on issues concerning parenting and children at risk; and the ISJL‘s own Macy B. Hart, who will talk about Jewish life in the South and taking a regional approach to Jewish community and programming. Segments are hosted by Darone Ruskay, Executive Director and Producer of JCast Network.

From Dreams to Deeds: Join the Journey will live at jcastnetwork.org/covenant and on iTunes. Each segment may be played immediately or downloaded to computers and mobile devices. We’re excited to tune in and take advantage of this learning opportunity – especially when we’re on the road, on our way to visit communities. Should be great conversation starters, and those meaningful conversations are ones we love to have. It’s also the perfect time to tune in for some streaming, stimulating Jewish content that will inspire you to think, to do, and to share – what better way to welcome the new year?

Thanks, Covenant and JCast, for making this resource available to everyone, no matter what your zip code!

L’shana tova, y’all!

How do you take advantage of things like podcasts? Do you listen to them alone? While running? Have you ever used them for a program or in any interactive way? Will you be tuning in to “Dreams to Deeds?”

 

 

Posted on September 19, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

“What is Rosh Hashanah?”

As the only Jewish kid in his middle school in suburban Mississippi, my youngest son Eric will be telling his friends why he won’t be at school Monday. He’ll say he won’t be there “because it’s Rosh Hashanah.”

And inevitably, the follow up question from his fellow 6th graders will be: “What’s that?”

I can just imagine the conversation continuing from there…

Well, it’s the Jewish New Year.

New Year? So does that mean it’s like New Year’s Eve, and you stay up late, and at midnight say ‘Happy New Year!’?

Well, no, not really.

Does it have anything to do with Chanukah? Oooh! Do you play the dreidel game? Do you eat those good chocolate coins?

No, it has nothing to do with that.

Then … what is it?

I thought about how to respond. The questions were about to hit hard and fast, and as his mom, it’s my job to coach Eric and make sure he knows what to say. I want him to be prepared. Which meant I needed to be prepared, and I am embarrassed to say…  I had to look it up.

I mean, of course I know what Rosh Hashanah is. I certainly know how to prepare the holiday dinner. I know what to say and do during services. I know the prayers, I know about saying I’m sorry, I know about the reflection … but I guess I was looking for the Cliff notes (Sparknotes?) version for what Rosh Hashanah “is”.

So at first, I went to my go-to reference guide, Joseph Telushkin’s wonderful Jewish Literacy book, and discovered the following information: “On Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, Jews are instructed to scrupulously examine their deeds and more significantly their misdeeds during the preceding year.  During these days, Jewish tradition teaches, God decides who shall live and who shall die during the coming year.  The prayers that we say attempt to influence God’s decisions.”

This is pretty heavy stuff. Who shall live and who shall die.  I have said those words every year since I began attending the adult service (let’s just say it’s been more than 30 years) and I never internalized those words – who shall live and who shall die.

Hmmm. Meaningful, yes, but not necessarily what I would advise Eric to tell his peers. “What’s Rosh Hoshanah? Oh, okay. Well. It’s basically when God decides who’s gonna live and who’s gonna die.”

So I went to the next great resource I had on hand – the ISJL pre-K curriculum. And you know what? In this particular situation, I think I prefer the early-childhood explanation: “During Rosh Hashanah, we think about how we want the new year to be better.  We reflect on the past year – at both the good things and the bad things. At the new year we get a chance to start over fresh and make every effort to be a better person.”

As Telushkin admits, the theme of life and death could easily have turned Rosh Hashanah into two days of utter morbidity.  To prevent this, the rabbis encouraged Jews to observe Rosh Hashanah in a spirit of optimism, confident that God will accept their repentance and extend their lives.  For example, they ordained that honey be served at all Rosh Hashanah meals and that slices of apple be dipped into it.  A special prayer is then recited:  May it be Thy will, O Lord, Our God, to grant us a year that is good and is sweet.

That’s more in line with what I hope Eric’s classmates will learn when they ask him about our holiday. It’s a day of fresh starts. A season when we ask for a good and sweet year to come. (And if you need more resources on what Rosh Hashanah is, there are plenty of great ones here, too!)

L’shana tova!

 

Posted on September 16, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

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