Pilgrimage

Pilgrimage:

“a journey to a place associated with someone or something well known or respected”
(The Oxford Pocket Dictionary of Current English)

Dan Ring at the Edmund Pettus Bridge

Ed. Fellow Dan Ring at the Edmund Pettus Bridge

Over the summer, every ISJL Education Fellow visits each of “our communities” – the 6-7 congregations we each serve, throughout the region. The summer visits are brief, and may take the form of an evening program, or just an hour to meet with the religious school director or synagogue president.  Though the meetings are short, they’re often far away – and that means we are in the car quite a bit.

On those long drives, it’s important to take a break now and then.  As a history buff, I try to make sure that those breaks include visits to historical sites.  On a recent trip, my companions and I (we often travel in groups for summer visits) decided to eat lunch in Selma, Alabama.  I didn’t know it then, but the brief stop would turn into my own unexpected, unplanned pilgrimage.

Entering Selma, we drove over the Edmund Pettus Bridge. I knew the bridge was famous, so we pulled over to take a picture.  I remembered that it had something to do with a march during the Civil Rights Movement, but I wasn’t clear on the specifics.  Reading the signs, I learned that the bridge was the scene of the Selma to Montgomery march and “Bloody Sunday.”  It dawned on me that Martin Luther King Jr., John Lewis, and Abraham Joshua Heschel had all marched over this bridge in their attempt to create a just and free society in America.  It was this bridge Heschel spoke of when he described acts of social justice as “praying with our feet.”  I thought about it a little bit, but feeling touristy, I just walked over the bridge, took some photos and moved on.

Over lunch I had the idea to investigate the Selma synagogue.  I knew it was there, and, after looking it up, realized it was less than a mile from where we were eating.

Historical plaque in front of Temple Mishkan Israel in Selma. Click for a larger view.

After a bit of searching, we spied a circular window with a large Jewish star smack dab in the middle. We parked in the grassy driveway and got out to look around. Once again, we took some pictures, walked around, and got back in the car and left.

Mulling it over later, I realized that visiting these two very different locations made up an unofficial, unplanned pilgrimage.  Together, the two sites reflect the spirit of humanity, the power of dedicated people to come together and accomplish big things.

Sure, the synagogue is a beautiful old building constructed in 1899.  But it symbolizes something bigger: the power of Jewish community to sustain itself and thrive anywhere.  I can’t even begin to imagine what it must have been like for a European Jewish immigrant to arrive and settle in Selma in the 1890s – but I am confident that it must not have been an easy transition.  It took courage, chutzpah, dedication, and community, to build and sustain a synagogue like this, especially in the Deep South, far away from much of the Jewish world.

Likewise, it took courage, chutzpah, dedication, and community, for those civil rights activists and ordinary people in the 1960s to march across the bridge, facing armed Alabama lawmen determined to stop them from creating change.  Their efforts helped to develop the society we live in today.

Pilgrimages are supposed to inspire us, to help us become better people and to give us goals to strive for.  My unexpected pilgrimage did just that.  I hope that, perhaps, in my next two years as an ISJL Education Fellow, I can emulate the courage, chutzpah, and dedication of these amazing individuals as I help to maintain and support our Southern Jewish community.

Posted on September 10, 2012

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