Monthly Archives: May 2012

There Are Places I Remember…..

An Orthodox rabbinic colleague Rabbi Zev Farber recently posted on Morethodoxy a piece on the experience of place women have in Orthodox synagogues.  He concludes his post with: “Rather my aim here is the underlying message that our synagogues are sending to women. We all want to remain true to halakhah and create a synagogue environment where men and women thrive, but I fear that without addressing the underlying message of women not really being in the room, instead of creating a home for all Jews, we are creating a men’s club.”

In response to this, I posted a comment to him “While I share the sentiments here, I am wondering why Rabbi Farber has written what is essentially a thirty or forty year old dated post, including the Flintstone and Ozick references. My fifty two year old wife would vigorously nod in agreement and my age seventeen and twenty seven daughters’ eyes would glaze over and say deal with it”.  (My twenty four year old is a less frequent synagogue attendee, but the one she attends less frequently would be Orthodox.)

It is interesting where we draw our lines in the sand. My daughters would never put up with being denied equal access to Jewish text, but are more at peace with ritual inequality or difference.  They do not harbor a secret desire to put on tefillen.  As my daughter put it “Why would I? Nobody in my community does”.

I am left to wonder why this is the case. What changed between my wife’s generation and my daughters’?  I think part of the answer is that my daughters are the beneficiaries of those women and men who came before them and fought the battles, created the learning environments and opened up the doors of the Beit Midrash.  What is striking is that the ritual practices per se are not the issue.  The fact that their voices can now be heard appears to be critical.  They are not silent but engaged participants in the debates of Jewish life. If they are not bothered by not being able to read Torah, it is because their voices can still be heard in the Beit Midrash actively engaging our sacred texts.

In a different vein, but I think not unrelated, I see a liberal approach to social issues. On the one hand they are committed to Taharat Hamishpacha (family purity laws) and there was no question my daughter would cover her hair after her wedding. However my sense is that on issues confronting their gay friends, my daughters simply want their friends to be happy in whatever relationship they are in.  

In acquiring a voice and becoming active learners, these young Orthodox women are at peace with their place in the synagogue.  They love the best of the Orthodox community, but they retain their moral voice.  As committed to halakhah as they are, they retain their sovereign self.

Posted on May 10, 2012

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The Supreme Court and the Health Care Act – A Populist Response

 

 

I can’t seem to decide, do I want to move America “Forward” or do I “Believe in America”?  I’m not sure if it matters that I back President Obama or Governor Romney because what I really worry about is what they can or can’t get done.  Congress seems so divided that precious little can ever get done.  According to Gallup, Congress’ Approval Rating was at 10% in February; now it is up to 17% (April).  By comparison, BP’s approval rating during the horrible oil spill in the Gulf was 16%.   I won’t be surprised when I see“Congress, we’re kinda like cheap gas” on the bumper of the Subaru that keeps my neighborhood politically informed.

 

The system of checks and balances that we have in this country looks to the Justice System, the Supreme Court, when the other two need sorting out.  With life-time appointments, our highest justices are suppose to be the adults in the room. Are they? Before the Supreme Court, right now, is the best Health Care bill our great nation has been able to produce since the creation of Medicare. It’s not perfect, but I believe in incremental progress when the alternative is gridlock and argument while those in need suffer.

 

Free Medical Services for 5000 at LA Sports Arena (October 2011)

The need for progress in health care is startling, and marks a divide be in our county between those who have and can afford access and those who cannot.  The journal Health Affairs, recently presented us with this stark reality:

“…Access to health care and use of health services for adults ages 19–64—the primary targets of the Affordable Care Act—deteriorated between 2000 and 2010, particularly among those who were uninsured. More than half of uninsured US adults did not see a doctor in 2010, and only slightly more than a quarter of these adults were seen by a dentist.”

The central role of government is to keep us safe, which includes much more then external military or terrorist threats, but also our physical and mental health.  The Talmud teaches that a rabbi is prepared to interpret law, when he or she can prove that which is unkosher to be kosher in twenty-four different ways.  I assume the same thing of Supreme Court Justices, civil jurists of the highest ability.  Activists or strict Constitutionalists, I believe that they can find what they want in the law to say whatever they want.  Which brings the issue to a moral question – Everyone deserves medical coverage.  In one of the most affluent nations in world history, it is an embarrassment that 5000 people have to wait once a year outside a sports area to get free health care (a big “thank you” to the volonteers at CareNow LA, now called Care Harbor).

If the Supreme Court strikes-down the Health Care Act, and we have to start health care reform all over again, instead of fixing the imperfect beginnings that are already underway, I’m just going to freak out.  If the Health Act tanks, Obama won’t save us, and Romney won’t either.  Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel taught that “in a free society, some are guilty, all are responsible.”  So if they mess it up, its on us, people.  We’ll have to act. If they do strike it down, this is what I want you to do:  “I want you to go to the window, open it, and shout, ‘I’m mad as hell, and I’m not going to take it any more!‘”

Peter Finch as Howard Beale wins best actor due to his "Mad as Hell" speech in the 1976 film, The Network. Click here to watch the clip.

No matter how much we “believe in America”, it may take a collective crescendo of rage to move us “forward”.

Posted on May 8, 2012

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Rabbis Without Borders: A Vision

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Have you been wondering what a Rabbi Without Borders really is? We have produced a video which describes who we are and the impact we are having on the Jewish world. If you are curious please take a look.

Posted on May 7, 2012

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On Cinco de Mayo: Jews on the edge of Tequila

Traditional Mexican Dancer at UJCL Gala, in Guadalajara, Mexico

Sipping margaritas, doing shots of tequila, listening mariachi music and dancing the hora.

Not in a million years would I have imagined that becoming a rabbi would lead to this.

Hora and rabbis go together to be certain, but in conjunction with mariachi? Seriously? But in this setting, nothing could have been more fitting than the juxtaposition of castanets and “Yerushalayim Shel Zahav.”

We were in Guadalajara, Mexico, at the closing gala of the Union of Jewish Congregations of Latin America and the Caribbean (UJCL). The music, the food, and the setting –the historic courtyard of city hall- were a perfect fit.

For the most part American Jews, and by this I really mean Jews living in the United States, rarely if ever think of Jewish life south the border. If we are to go by size, this oversight might be forgiven. There are only 40,000 Jews in Mexico and in Guadalajara a mere 500. But as our 5 days in Guadalajara proved, size is by no means the only measure when it comes to Jewish life.

All the communities that belong to the UJCL are small; at 180 members the Comunidad Judia de Guadalajara is no exception. Yet, the community put their heart and soul into opening up their home to us and to showcasing what it means to be Mexican Jews and they succeeded.

Mariachi Band at the UJCL Gala

I was met at the airport (at the very delayed hour of 1am) by Louis and Roxanne. As we drove to the hotel, I learned that every Friday night the entire community comes together to share Shabbat dinner, the sense of belonging is real. There is no Jewish school in the city, but the children are very engaged in congregational life, getting up for minyan weekly. Indeed, when we came to the synagogue on for services all but one part of the Torah reading was done by teens. I can’t recall the last time I’ve seen that in any community in the United States. Moreover, the 180 members of the community absorbed nearly their number of guests inviting us into their homes for dinner on Friday night.

The members of Comunidad Judia de Guadalajara are also very proud of their Mexican heritage. In addition to the sessions on Jewish life in Central America and the Torah learning, we experienced some of the cultural sights and sounds of the area with visit not only to the historic city hall but also the Cabañas Cultural Institute – a Unesco World Heritage site, with extraordinary murals and architecture. Like the Mariachi music to which we were treated, the tequila is a local specialty. The town of Tequila is located near the edge of this bustling city.

The Jews of Guadalajara are deeply connected to both their Jewish and Mexican roots, proud of both elements of their heritage. Ahead of Cinco de Mayo, I asked Rabbi Joshua Kullock the rabbi of Comunidad Judia about this dual identity and how he sees it in his community. “Take a look at the video we made singing the Hatikvah,” he suggested. I did, and recommend you do too. Young and old, singers and crooners, with accents that belie their Spanish mother tongue, these Jews remind us of how communities can come together, bringing together multiple identities to help create and share meaning.

This Cinco de Mayo, I’ll raise a glass tequila to my friends in Guadajara and thank God for a rabbinate that includes this.

Posted on May 3, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy