Love Story: The Making of a Jewish Wedding

I prepared the bimah with two kiddush cups, a bottle of kosher wine and a glass wrapped in a white linen napkin.  With the chuppah above me, I waited for the processional music to begin. The bridesmaids and the groomsmen walked down respectfully.   The Chatan savored his steady pace as his parents walked by his side.

As the music changed its melody, the drama inside the sanctuary began. The congregation turned their heads towards the action behind them.  They stood and gazed at the beautiful Kallah as if she was the Shechinah herself entering into this holy palace. When the Chatan took the hand of his beloved and guided her up the steps to the chuppah, a rush of spiritual seduction filled the cavernous space at the Sixth & I Historic Synagogue in the District of Columbia.

The music stopped.  An expectant stillness descended while the couple circled each other before settling inside the sanctified chuppah for the single purpose: to wed each other.

At that moment in time and space, we become the witnesses to their private love story and we are inoculated with a joy drip.

After the exchange of rings and their vows, the ketubah was read.

Through all time and space there will be no story like our story

One of the joys of being a rabbi is witnessing the making of a marriage. The journey towards the chuppah may be a few months or a few years or sometimes a few decades.  When the invitations arrive by email or by snail mail, many of us sigh knowing that we have the possibility of being moved, inspired and transformed, if only momentarily.

Last week, I brought two families together under the chuppah with an energy I didn’t think I had.  I imagined that we were in the Garden of Eden and that all our desires were taken care of and all the craziness of life had somehow disappeared.  Time and space evolved to make this love story come alive.

The connection between bride, groom and rabbi doesn’t just happen.  For me there is no pro forma wedding ceremony.  I meet with all my couples for a minimum of three sessions and a maximum of five sessions.   Through face to face meetings, skype and phone calls and emails, I contract with them for a period of time from their engagement to the chuppah.

My relationship with them and the relationship to each other creates a vibration field of energy that promotes a spiritual outcome.  Why would any couple want less from their officiant?  But are they willing to spend the time and the money to enhance not just the ceremony but the marriage itself?

As a rabbi, I know that when a couple decides to marry, they want someone who understands their joy and their pain, their deepest dreams and their darkest fears. They want someone who is interested in their spiritual interiority and can listen without judgment or critique.  Who else will have these conversations if not their spiritual leader and confidante?  These transitional times in our lives call for reflection, mindfulness and soul expansion.

The Baal Shem Tov expressed it best.

From every human being there rises a light that reaches straight to heaven.  And when two souls that are destined to be together find each other, their streams of light flow together, and a single brighter light goes forth from their united being.

As a rabbi, I am called to bring these lights together and to add my light and the light of the Holy One into the love story called Kiddushin.  You may now break the glass!  Mazal Tov!

Posted on March 27, 2012

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