Author Archives: Aviva Kanoff

About Aviva Kanoff

Aviva Kanoff is the author of The No-Potato Passover. She paints, teaches a mixed media art class, and dabbles in photography. Her creative approach to life led her to artistic experimentation with food, and after years of creating her own recipes and working as a personal chef, she wrote The No-Potato Passover.

This Passover, Play With your Food!

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This year, you won’t have to bribe your kids to eat their vegetables. With so many colorful and exciting foods out there, they’ll be begging you for more! Can you blame them? With pictures of tri-color cauliflower, and dancing rainbow carrots, they’ll think dinner was created by Disney. Throw in easy-to-follow recipes and colorful pictures and watch out, they may even be cooking you dinner!

Magic Spaghetti Squash

What kid doesn’t love a good magic trick?! Especially one they can perform themselves!

And, for just under a dollar a pound, it’s really a win-win situation. If you haven’t already guessed from the title of this paragraph, I’m talking about spaghetti squash, all natural and so healthy! Kids love pasta (and this looks just like it), and combined with the fun of shredding it themselves in under a minute, they won’t miss the 200 calories they are saving by avoiding the real thing.

Ratatoullie, the Dish, Not the Mouse.

Kids are familiar with the cartoon chef named Ratatoullie, but, little do they know, it’s also a healthy and delicious food! Maybe they can use a French accent while they are eating it too!

Pop Goes the Quinoa

Children will watch in amazement as the water disappears and the quinoa pops out of its seed during the cooking process. A great source of protein and fiber, and it’s also light and fluffy!

Please Eat the Flowers!

Who knew you could eat flowers? With recipes like stuffed zucchini blossoms and flowering chives, you can encourage something out of the ordinary and provide a unique experience at the dinner table. This will stimulate your child’s curiosity and make them excited and interested about food they’re eating.

Crayola’d Cauliflower

With cauliflower available in colors like purple and yellow, your kids will think dinner was brought to them by Dr. Seuss.

Dancing Rainbow Carrots

rainbow carrots

Add a touch of whimsy to your table with these iresistable rainbow baby carrots. If that goes over well, you can introduce them to rainbow chard too!

And Finally, for Dessert…

Meet kiki-riki, the tznius banana lady!

 

banana lady

It’s not every day you see a lady with bananas on her head! Your kids will fall in love with this wild banana lady just like I did when I encountered her in a Jamaican jungle as she chased me with her machete. My recipe for banana muffins is so easy and a great way to introduce kids to baking. There’s no better way to incorporate the importance of Passover into their lives than through yummy food and hands on, interactive experiences.

Cajun Carrot Fries

Ingredients:
• 8-10 large carrots, peeled and cut into thin slices, like “fries”
• 1 tbsp. olive oil
• ¼ tsp. cayenne pepper
• salt and black pepper, to taste 

Directions:
1. Preheat your oven to 450°.
2. Grease and/or line a large cookie sheet.
3. Toss the sliced carrots with olive oil, cayenne pepper, salt and black pepper.
4. Arrange the fries in a single layer on your baking sheet and bake for 15 minutes, then flip the fries over and bake for another 10-15 minutes, until crisp. Serve warm.

Eggplant Parmigiana

Ingredients:
• 2 cups tomato sauce
• 1 large eggplant,
sliced into ½ inch thick round pieces
• 2 eggs
• 1 cup matzoh meal or ground walnut
(or half & half)
• 8 oz. mozzarella cheese
• 3 ounces goat cheese (if unavailable, substitute with additional mozzarella)
• salt and pepper

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 350°.
2. Salt eggplant on both sides and leave for 30 minutes until liquid is released.
3. Crack and mix eggs in one bowl, and pour matzoh meal and/or ground walnuts and seasoning into a second bowl.
4. Dip eggplant slices of eggplant first in eggs, then in matzoh meal and/or ground walnuts.
5. Fry each slice in canola oil for 2 minutes on each side until soft.
6. In a 9×12 inch pan, create layers with eggplant, goat cheese, and tomato sauce (creates about 3 layers).
7. Top with mozzarella cheese.
8. Bake, uncovered, for 20 minutes or until mozzarella cheese is melted.


Both recipes can be found in The No Potato Passover (Brio Books; 2012 Hardcover $29.95)

Posted on April 6, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Passover for Non-Bolivians (and a Recipe!)

By now, most people have heard of quinoa, the superfood. With plenty of fiber, protein and vitamins it sounds like a super idea. The problem arises when the time comes to actually prepare this somewhat unfamiliar item and poses a special problem during the upcoming holiday of Passover. Jewish people tend to favor foods from their particular part of the Diaspora during these eight days. And really, how many Jews are actually from Bolivia?  But never fear, we Jews are a glorious melting pot! We may have been kicked out of many places but we wind up taking the menus with us.

Quin-what?

I have recently traveled around the country to do cooking demonstrations in response to my new book, The No-Potato Passover, and I have found that people have a fear and mistrust of this simple Bolivian staple.

But what exactly is quinoa?

Is it a grain? A seed? A vegetable? Help!

Quinoa (pronounced “keen-whah”) is often mistaken for a grain, but it’s actually a seed — one that originated thousands of years ago in the Andes Mountains. Dubbed “the gold of the Incas,” it’s treasured because of it’s nutritive value. Quinoa actually has more protein than any other grain or seed and offers a complete protein, meaning it contains all the essential amino acids our bodies can’t make on their own. It’s also a great source of calcium and is high in lysine, the B vitamins and iron. To top it off, the seed is easy to digest and gluten free! If you are counting carbs or just want to eat healthier quinoa is your new best friend.

Why has this tiny seed brought forth such huge confusion?

For starters, misinformation, or don’t believe the bag!! Typically, the label will state to boil for 15 minutes. In my experience, quinoa is not ready for consumption before 20- 25 minutes of cooking time. Only when the seed “pops” and it is soft, is it ready to be eaten.
But it doesn’t taste like anything.
A-ha! That’s where you come in. The wonder of quinoa is that you can make it taste like anything you want. Think of the biblical mana that fell from heaven.
Do you like savory flavors? Reach for the pepper and garlic. Middle Eastern more your style? How about cumin and safron?  Use different colored vegetables and tangy fruit to add more texture and “zing” and soon you too will be singing the praises of quinoa. It will supply the wonderful canvas to bring out your inner culinary artist.
Mixed Berry Quinoa with Roasted Almonds



Ingredients:

• 1 cup red quinoa
• 1 cup slivered almonds
• 1 cup white quinoa
• 5-6 medium mushrooms, chopped
• 1 cup golden raisins
• 1 Vidalia onion, diced
• 1 cup Craisins
• 2 tbsp. canola oil
• salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

1. Cook quinoa according to package.
2. In a separate skillet, sauté onions in canola oil until golden brown.
3. Add chopped mushrooms and sauté for one minute.
4. Add raisins, craisins and almonds, and sauté for another minute.
5. When quinoa is ready, add to pan and mix with other ingredients.
6. Add salt and pepper to taste.

Recipe from The No Potato Passover (Brio Books; 2012 Hardcover $29.95)

Posted on April 4, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

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