Tag Archives: Conservative movement

The Kavannah for Gay Ordination

On March 26, 2007, the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, the legal and spiritual center for Conservative Judaism in America, responded to a new tshuvah, or Jewish legal ruling, issued by that movement, and officially announced it would ordain openly gay and lesbian rabbis.

Keshet JTS

This rainbow sign says “Welcome!” in Hebrew. Photo via Keshet JTS

At an all day conference at the Seminary marking the one year anniversary of this historic decision, two rabbis offered a special kavannah, or guiding intention.

Rabbis Karen Reiss Medwed and Francince Roston wrote this kavannah to commemorate the occasion, using a traditional format and liturgical vocabulary. We bring you this kavannah to commemorate the sixth anniversary of the Conservative movement’s decision to ordain gay and lesbian rabbis, a major step towards making the Jewish world an more inclusive space for LGBTQ Jews.

אלוהי כל בריות
יוצר אדם בצלמו
בצלם דמות תבניתו
עומדים אנחנו היום לפניך
בהודיה והלל
על פתיחת שער קהילתנו
בחזקה ובעצמה
Dearest Shekhina of all humanity
who embraces us together
under her wings of peace
We stand before you today
with open pride
Celebrating this tremendous day!
אל נא רפא נא
כי קלה לא הייתה הדרך
בהגיענו עד סף הפתח
:ונאמר היום
חזק
Be Strong:
For our reservoirs of individual strength as we journeyed in masked silence awaiting this day
חזק
Be Strong:
For the triumph of justice and צדק [tzedek] as we held to truth to illuminate the path to this day
ונתחזק
And let us be strengthened
As we continue forward and gain strength to bring completeness to this journey
כי נדע שעוד רבה הדרך
אך היום במרגע, בתפילה, ובנשימה עמוקה
אנו נהלל את האל הייחודי
אשר את כולנו ברא
:ונאמר היום
חזק
Be Strong:
And celebrate the open inclusion of all Jews to this House of Study and Place of worship
חזק
Be Strong:
And celebrate the open inclusion and acceptance of all Jews as כלי קודש [holy vessels] in this community
ונתחזק
And be strengthened
As we celebrate today the simple yet elusive blessing written by Marcia Falk:
to be who we are and to be blessed in all that we are
נהיה אשר נהיה
ונהיה ברוכים באשר נהיה
Let us say together – with passion and conviction, with love and affirmation, through tears and through joyous proclamation -
חזק   חזק    ונתחזק

Posted on March 28, 2013

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Golda Och Academy Bans the Scouts, Stands for Inclusion

“To exclude same-sex families from membership and adult volunteerism is in direct contradiction of school policies, which place high value on inclusion.”

-Donna Oshri, Golda Och Academy

Creating inclusive Jewish spaces is a great goal — but how do you do it? While the answer is likely different for every synagogue, school, and youth group, it’s helpful and encouraging to hear about others’ successes, triumphs, and their lessons learned. So we’re running this regular column, called “The Tachlis of Inclusion,” to spotlight practices and policies that have worked for Jewish institutions all over the country. We hope they inspire you. 

Photo Courtesy of GLAAD

His mom was removed as troop leader because she is a lesbian. (Courtesy of GLAAD.)

In October 2012, the administration of Golda Och Academy, a Conservative Jewish day school in New Jersey, sent a letter home to parents, letting them know that the school would not be renewing its Boy Scouts charter. The reason? The Boy Scouts of America’s decision to ban gay scouts and adult troop leaders.

“It was a very short meeting,” Adam Shapiro, Dean of Students at Golda Och Academy, remembers about the decision to end the school’s relationship with the local Boy Scout Troop. “Everyone on our administrative team looked at each other and said, this is pretty obvious. And since we made our decision, basically all of the feedback we’ve received has been positive.”

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Posted on March 20, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy