Tag Archives: recipe

Halva Swirl Brownies

Yield:
16 brownies

For some time now I had in my head that I wanted to make a brownie that involved halva, that delicious Middle Eastern sesame confection. I researched. I pondered.

And then when I got a jar of the brand-new Soomsoom Foods Tehina, I knew it was my sign to go for it. What I loved about using this particular sesame paste was the super smooth consistency, easy pour-ability and also the fantastic plastic container. Much less messy or tricky to open than the metal cans!

SONY DSC

I used this recipe for Nutella Cream Cheese Swirl Brownies from Lovin’ in the Oven as the inspiration for my recipe.

While I chose to sprinkle the halva pieces on top of the brownies, you could also mix them into the brownie batter itself, or make a double batch of the brownies and do a layer of brownie filled with the tahini-cream cheese filling. The possibilities are endless.

Want to make this “semi-homemade” or pareve? Use some tried-and-true store-bought brownie mix and mix as directed. Add 1/4 cup chocolate chips to batter, and sprinkle 1/2 cup crumbled halva on top for another variation.

SONY DSC

Halva Swirl Brownies

Ingredients

For the halva-cream cheese layer:

5 oz cream cheese

2 Tbsp butter, softened

¼ cup sugar

1 egg

1 Tbsp flour

½ cup tahini

For the brownie layer:

¾ cups flour

1/3 cup Hersheys Special Dark Cocoa

½ tsp baking powder

¼ tsp cinnamon

½ tsp salt

¼ cup butter, softened (1/2 stick)

1 cup sugar

1 tsp vanilla

2 large eggs

1/4 cup chocolate chips

For the top:

¼ cup – ½ cup crumbled halva pieces

Directions

Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees. Grease and line an 8 x 8 baking pan with cooking spray.

For the brownie layer:

Sift flour, cocoa, cinnamon, salt and baking powder into a medium sized bowl.

In a small bowl cream the sugar and butter together until smooth, add eggs one at a time, beat well then add vanilla.

Fold egg, sugar, butter and vanilla mixture into the bowl of dry ingredients. Fold in chocolate chips.

Spread 3/4 of the brownie batter into the bottom of an 8 x 8 baking dish.

For the halvai-cream cheese layer:

Cream together butter, sugar and flour. Add cream cheese and mix/blend until smooth.

Scrape bowl and add the egg and beat until light and creamy.

Scrape down bowl again and add the tahini. Beat one minute or until the tahini is mixed into the cream cheese mixture completely.

To assemble:

Randomly dollop the tahini-cream cheese topping over the brownie batter. Dollop the remaining brownie batter on top.

Sprinkle halva pieces on top. Swirl the topping together into batter using a butter knife.

Bake at 350 for around 40-45 minutes.

Allow to cool and cut brownies into squares.

Love Jewish food? Sign up for our weekly recipe newsletter!

Posted on December 11, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Tomato Alphabet Soup

Yield:
6-8 servings

When I used to live in Washington, DC there was a little bar I loved frequenting which served, among other delicious items, tater tots, grilled cheese and even homemade tomato soup – all the best childhood comfort foods, just a bit upgraded. At some point in the restaurant’s history it changed over the menu to tapas (small Spanish-style plates), and the tater tots and grilled cheeses were a thing of the past. Sigh.

I love updating comfort foods, like my Sweet Potato Mac n Cheese and Shakshuka Pizza among other dishes. There is something so exciting about taking a bite that is both new and also brings back fond memories.

SONY DSC

So on a cold November day a few weeks ago when my friend’s son requested soup for lunch, I knew right away I wanted to make something a 3 year old would enjoy as much as I would: creamy, healthy tomato soup with just a spoonful of playful alphabet letters, a throwback to childhood classics. Everyone enjoyed the tomato soup that day, including my 1 year old daughter, the 3 year old Jonah and me and the husband.

Make sure not to add the alphabet pasta until you serve otherwise the pasta will absorb too much of the soup and it will have a mushy, non-soup-like consistency.

SONY DSC

Tomato Alphabet Soup

Ingredients

2 Tbsp butter or olive oil

1 onion, diced

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 14 ounce can of crushed tomatoes

1 ½-2 cups vegetable or chicken broth

Salt and pepper

½ cup alphabet or other small pasta

Fresh chives

½ cup heavy cream (optional)

Directions

Add butter or oil to a medium pot over medium heat. Sauté onion and garlic until translucent.

Add crushed tomatoes and stock. Season with salt and pepper to taste and bring back to a boil. Reduce heat after 10 minutes to low.

Bring a small pot of water to a boil. Cook pasta around 6 minutes or according to directions. Drain pasta and drizzle with a tiny amount of olive oil to prevent pasta from sticking. Set aside until ready to serve.

If you want the soup to be a smoother consistency, you can puree the soup in batches in a blender or food processor. If not, you can leave soup as is.

If making the soup dairy, add heavy cream before serving.

Add a heaping tablespoon of pasta to each bowl. Sprinkle chopped chives on top and serve.

Posted on December 2, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Sweet Potato Latkes With Toasted Marshmallows

Yield:
12 latkes

When I was brainstorming my Thanksgivukkah menu I kept dwelling on one of my favorite childhood holiday dishes – what my family calls “Sweet Potato Yum Yum” (or what another family might call sweet potato casserole). You are probably familiar with the heavenly combination of pureed sweet potatoes, margarine, brown sugar and spices, topped with marshmallows and baked to sweet, melted perfection.

Combining the flavors from my family’s Sweet Potato Yum Yum into individual-sized sweet potato latkes topped with toast marshmallows seemed like the perfect crowd-pleasing dish to mark this once-in-a-lifetime holiday. And it is. Happy Thanksgivukkah!

Sweet Potato Latkes3

 

Reprinted courtesy of www.thebigfatjewishwedding.com

Sweet Potato Latkes With Toasted Marshmallows

Ingredients

1 lb sweet potatoes

1/3 cup all-purpose flour

2 large eggs

½ tsp salt

1 heaping tsp pumpkin pie spice

2 Tbsp brown sugar

3/4 cup vegetable oil

Mini marshmallows

Directions

Peel and coarsely grate the sweet potatoes.

Place grated potatoes in a dish towel and wring out as much excess liquid as possible. This step is key to making sure your latkes are crispy. In a medium bowl stir together potatoes, flour, salt, pumpkin pie spice and brown sugar. Lightly beat eggs in a small bowl. Fold eggs into potato mixture until combined.

Heat oil in a deep skillet over moderately high heat.

Check to see if oil is hot enough by putting a small drop of the potato mixture in the oil. If it starts bubbling it is ready for frying.

Spoon approximately 1/8 cup potato mixture per latke into the oil. Flatten with a spatula and don’t crowd the pan otherwise the latkes won’t crispy properly.

Reduce heat to medium and cook until golden brown, about 1- 2 minutes per side.

Transfer latkes to a cookie rack to cool.

Turn on your oven’s broiler. Place latkes on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and top each latke with marshmallows. Place latkes with marshmallows in the oven and watch carefully to make sure the marshmallows don’t brown too much.

Once marshmallows toasted until just brown, remove from oven and serve.

Posted on November 25, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Mashed Potato, Turkey and Cranberry Knishes with Cranberry Mustard

Yield:
18 appetizer-sized knishes

Is there anything better than waking up the day after Thanksgiving and raiding the fridge full of leftovers while everyone else is elbowing one another at the mall?

My favorite Thanksgiving leftovers were always the excess crescent rolls slathered in butter next to some stuffing and a heaping pile of glazed sweet potatoes. A few carbs during the holidays never hurt anyone. But there comes a point sometime on the Saturday or Sunday after Thanksgiving where you just can’t look at another plate of turkey and glazed sweet potatoes. You are craving something different, but ahhh – who wants to waste all those leftover?

Fret no more because I have your solution: bite-sized Thanksgiving knishes made with leftover mashed potatoes, turkey and cranberry sauce. Combine these mini treats with some cranberry mustard dipping sauce and leftovers never sounded so good!

SONY DSC

Other variations:

  • Substitute the mashed potatoes with leftover stuffing or mashed sweet potatoes.
  • Substitute the cranberry sauce inside the knishes for leftover gravy.

The possibilities are endless, or at least as endless as your leftovers.

SONY DSC

Mashed Potato, Turkey and Cranberry Knishes with Cranberry Mustard

Ingredients

2 sheets puff pastry, thawed for 30 minutes

1 cup cranberry sauce, divided

1 Tbsp Dijon mustard

½ tsp whole grain mustard

½ cup leftover mashed potato

½ - ¾ cup leftover turkey, diced

1 egg, beaten

All purpose flour for rolling out puff pastry

Directions

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

On a lightly floured surface, roll out the puff pastry on all sides so that dough stretches slightly. Cut into 9 even squares.

Using fingers stretch each square just a little bit more. Add tsp of mashed potatoes, a few pieces of turkey and tsp of cranberry sauce onn each square.

Fold each point of the puff pastry up and pinch at the top. Twist puff pastry and then push down. Repeat.

Brush each knish with beaten egg.

Bake for 30-35 minutes, until golden brown.

While knishes bake, mix ½ cup cranberry sauce with 1 Tbsp Dijon mustard and ½ tsp whole grain mustard. Spicy brown mustard can also be substituted. Whisk together until smooth.

Serve knishes while warm with cranberry mustard.

Posted on November 24, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Cakey Crunch Sweet Potato Kugel

Yield:
16 servings

Most of my favorite recipes use wholesome, healthful ingredients that are local and seasonal. I don’t buy a lot of processed products or packaged snacks. I truly enjoy making things from scratch.

But once in awhile I find a recipe or a product that I simple cannot resist. Oreo cookies. Entenmanns’s Cheese Danish Twist. And most recently a sweet potato kugel my mother-in-law made last year using sweet potatoes, marshmallows and a box of cake mix.

SONY DSC

My sister-in-law and I sat at one end of the long kitchen table with two heaping platefuls of the addictive kugel, unable to prevent ourselves from eating yet another serving.

SONY DSC

Soon after the sweet potato kugel binge, I fell asleep with my daughter upstairs for a full hour and a half. Forget the turkey-induced snooze fest…my kugel nap was just divine.

I convinced my mother-in-law to hand over the recipe, and with just a few small tweaks, I share it with you all. But I warn you: there is no going back. Make this at your own risk. You may not be able to put down your fork.

SONY DSC

Cakey Crunch Sweet Potato Kugel

Ingredients

8 medium sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into quarters

1 Tbsp vanilla extract

3-4 heaping Tbsp brown sugar

¼ tsp nutmeg

½ tsp kosher salt

¼ cup orange juice or orange-flavored liqueur

8 oz mini marshmallows

1 box yellow cake mix

2 sticks margarine or butter, melted

Directions

Boil sweet potatoes in large pot of water until tender, around 20-25 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

Drain the sweet potatoes and mash in a large bowl. Add vanilla, brown sugar, nutmeg, salt and orange juice or orange-flavored liqueur and mix well.

Grease a 9x11 baking dish. Layer half of the sweet potato mixture evenly in the baking dish.

Sprinkle marshmallows over the top. Add remaining sweet potato mixture on top of marshmallows and spread evenly using an off-set spatula or knife.

Sprinkle yellow cake mix evenly over the top of sweet potato mixture. Pour melted butter or margarine evenly over the top of the cake mix.

Bake for 60 minutes. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Posted on November 20, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Tostones for Hanukkah

Yield:
4-6 servings

The day I moved into my very first apartment was an important day for me. I was starting my senior year in college, and for what seemed like the first time, I was taking a leap towards independence. Sure, I moved halfway across the country to go to school where I knew only a couple people, but living on campus, there’s a certain safety net in place to catch (and comfort) the students if they fall.

IMG_3257

I remember taking great care to choose an apartment within my budget, and carefully selecting my roommates. We plotted and planned how we’d decorate, and made memories building our ready-to-assemble furniture from our favorite Swedish retailer. Not surprising, the part of apartment living I was most excited about was that I would finally have a kitchen of my own. While my roommates concentrated on finding art to decorate our walls and the perfect rug to tie the room together, I focused on stocking our kitchen with our favorite foods and the tools with which to cook them. I found mismatched sets of pots and pans at my local discount store, and piece by piece, built our little kitchen into a functional one our friends begged to come and borrow. It was nothing fancy, but it worked for us. Granted, we could never invite more than four people for dinner, because that was how many plates we had, but we made it work.

My mom noticed my efforts, and took it upon herself to stock our little kitchen with its crowning jewel: a tostonera. A tostonera is a device specifically designed to smash chunks of fried green plantains into crisp, golden coins, called tostones. And the fact that my mom was gifting me a tostonera was a really big deal, because this served as an informal invitation to join the culinary ranks of the matriarchs in the family.

Just about every Cuban person who cooks has a tostonera, and now, I did too. I was so excited to put my tostonera to use, and at the first Hanukkah party of the season, I surprised my friends with a new treat. I figured that in many ways, Cubans use plantain bananas the way Americans use potatoes, so swapping traditional potato latkes with savory tostones seemed like a natural choice.

Pressing Tostones

As my friends oohed and aahed while they crunched their way through the small plate of tostones, I smiled with delight, because I knew I was on my way to earning my culinary stripes. 

Tostones for Hanukkah

This Hanukkah, if you’re looking for something outside the traditional latke box, take a cue from the Cuban cookbook, and serve tostones alongside your festive meal. And if your mother hasn’t gifted you with a tostonera, fear not. You can achieve similar results with the bottom of a frying pan.

Tostones

Ingredients

Vegetable oil for frying

2 green (under ripe) plantain bananas

Kosher salt to taste

Directions

In a large frying pan, pour in enough vegetable oil to fill the pan about halfway, and place over medium to high heat.

Remove the peel from the plantains, and discard. Chop the pulp into rounds of about 1-1½ inch thickness.

To test the oil temperature, carefully place a small piece of plantain into the oil. If the oil bubbles around the plantain, it is ready. If it doesn't, continue heating the oil until it does.

Once the oil is ready, carefully drop the plantain rounds into the oil, and fry for two minutes before flipping and frying for two minutes on the other side.

Remove the plantains from the oil, and using either a tostonera or a frying pan and a flat surface, smash the rounds until they flatten.

Return the now-flattened plantain rounds to the oil, and fry until golden and crisp, about two more minutes.

Remove the plantains from the oil, and immediately place on a platter lined with paper towel to catch any unnecessary oil.

Sprinkle with kosher salt while the plantains are still hot, and serve.

Posted on November 17, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Meatball, Egg, and Arugula Cheeseless Pizza

Yield:
3-4 servings

Every home cook has those go-to meals that their friends and family can’t get enough of. For me, it’s my Italian meatballs that I learned in the kitchen with my mother. While standing at my mother’s side, she would fry batch after batch of meatballs. But only after taste-testing the first one to make sure it was seasoned correctly.

I love carrying on this tradition, and relish sharing this special meal with my loved ones. When my close friends hear I am making spaghetti and meatballs for Sunday night dinner they will drop everything to come join us for dinner. The husband isn’t always so eager to share this coveted meal.

SONY DSC

Last week for the first time I served up spaghetti and meatballs for my pasta-loving daughter. She typically gobbles up pasta with sauce pretty quickly, but this time she voraciously ate 5 entire portions of chopped up spaghetti with bits of meatballs. I was a proud mama.

One of my favorite parts about whipping up a large batch of meatballs and sauce on a Sunday is having leftovers for the rest of the week. The husband and I often buy a crunchy loaf of fresh bread the next day and make meatball subs. It’s such an easy weeknight meal, especially when paired with a side salad or steamed broccoli.

SONY DSC

But even after heaping bowls of spaghetti and meatball subs there were still more meatballs to be had.  What to do with those last precious meatballs?

A light bulb went off and I thought: pizza! I have made non-dairy pizza with meatballs before, and it was good enough. But I wanted to make something really special. As I was mulling over what I had in my fridge and what might combine nicely with the meatballs I thought….eggs….arugula…and another great non-dairy pizza combination was born in my humble kitchen.

Tip: don’t skimp on the extra drizzle of olive oil and sprinkle of sea salt – it really brings out the flavor of the unique pizza. And don’t worry if you don’t have a pizza stone – you can also use a baking sheet.

SONY DSC

Meatball, Egg and Arugula Cheeseless Pizza

Ingredients

To make the meatballs:

1 lb ground beef

1 lb ground veal

1 extra large egg or 2 medium eggs

1 1/2-2 cups unseasoned bread crumbs (preferably fresh)

1 tsp salt

1/2 tsp pepper

2 tsp dried parsley

2 tsp dried oregano

2 tsp dried basil

1 tsp garlic powder

vegetable oil for frying

small bowl of cold water

tomato sauce of your choosing

To make the pizza:

1 store-bought pizza dough, left at room temperature 1 hour

flour for dusting

2 Tbsp olive oil

3 meatballs

1 cup tomato sauce

3 eggs

1 cup fresh arugula

olive oil for drizzling

thick sea salt

Special equipment: pizza stone

Directions

To make the meatballs:

In a large mixing bowl, combine breadcrumbs, salt, pepper, oregano, parsley, basil and garlic powder.

Add meat and eggs and mix thoroughly, but lightly, with hands; do not overwork the meat. Set the small bowl of cold water next to your working station.

Prepare a platter lined with paper towels and place next to the stove as you prepare the meatballs.

Working with just the palm of your hand, and not packing too tight, make fist sized meatballs and place on unlined platter. Use cold water to wet hands in between each meatball. Place meatballs in skillet, and brown on all sides until even.

When meatballs are all fried, put into a slightly simmering pot of tomato sauce to finish cooking through and absorb the tomato sauce flavor.

To make the pizza:

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Once oven is fully heated, place pizza stone in oven for at least 30 minutes, or up to 60 minutes.

Working on a lightly floured surface, stretch pizza dough using hands and rolling pin until desired thinness and shape.

Using pastry brush or fingers, spread 2 Tbsp olive oil all over pizza dough.

Cut meatballs into rounds. Spread sauce evenly over dough. Place on pizza stone and cook 6 minutes.

Crack eggs into a bowl while pizza is cooking.

After 6 minutes, open oven and carefully spread eggs over pizza a few inches apart from one another. Put back into the oven for another 5-6 minutes.

Remove pizza from oven. Allow to cool 2-3 minutes.

Sprinkle fresh arugula over top of pizza. Drizzle with olive olive oil and sprinkle thick sea salt.

Serve immediately.

Posted on November 13, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Bourbon Pecan and Chocolate Gelt Pie

Yield:
8 servings

Wondering what to do with all your leftover gelt after making the DIY Thanksgivukkah table runner? I’ve got the perfect pie recipe to use up those chocolates!

GeltPie

Both decadent and delicious, this Bourbon Pecan and Gelt Pie is the perfect way to end your Thanksgivukkah meal this holiday season. To create this recipe, I combined a classic pecan pie with some chocolate gelt candy and then added a touch of Bourbon for a little something extra.

Just like Thanksgivukkah itself, everyone is sure to love it!

BurbounPecanandGelt

 

Bourban Pecan and Chocolate Gelt Pie

Ingredients

For the crust:

2 cups of flour, plus extra for rolling out the dough

1 tsp salt

1 tsp sugar

2/3 cup cold shortening

7 Tbsp milk. Almond milk is a great non-dairy alternative.

For the filling:

1/3 cup melted butter or margarine

2/3 cup sugar

1 cup light corn syrup

½ tsp salt

3 eggs

1-2 Tbsp bourbon

20-25 pieces of gelt—enough to cover the bottom of the crust. (You can order pareve gelt online.)

½ cup chopped pecans

½ cup halved pecans

Directions

To make the crust:

Whisk together flour, salt and sugar. Cut shortening into the flour mixture until it is almost incorporated.

Add milk and mix until just combined. You do not want to over mix here, or the crust will be rubbery. Form a large ball with the dough and place in the middle of a flat surface covered with flour.

With a rolling pin, roll the dough out until it is about 2 inches larger than the upside down pie plate. Once it is big enough, flip the pie plate back over and lay the dough in the plate lightly pushing it to the bottom and the sides.

With a fork, poke a few holes in the bottom of the crust and push the sides of the crust into the side of the plate. Then, to make the lip of the pie look fancy, use the fork to make marks in the dough on the lip of the plate (picture shown) and rip off any excess dough. Set aside for filling.

Note: You can also use the extra dough to make decorations. Roll out the extra dough and cut out any shape you want – here I used a turkey. With a fork, mix 1 egg and 1 Tbsp of water. Lightly brush a small amount of the eff mixture over the cut out and then sprinkle with sugar. Bake at 375 until golden brown (about 2-5 minutes depending on how big your cut out is).

To make the filling and assemble pie:

Mix melted butter or margarine and corn syrup together until it has a glossy look. Add salt and sugar and mix until it is completely integrated into the mixture. Mix in eggs and bourbon until the entire mixture is a pale yellow color (no darker yellow egg streaks). Set aside.

Start filling the crust by placing the unwrapped gelt at the bottom of the pie crust. Add both chopped and halved pecans. Then add filling mixture.

Bake at 375 degrees for 45 minutes to an hour. The edges of the crust should be a golden brown and the filling should be completely congealed.

Posted on November 10, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Cumin Spiced Tomato Soup with Wild Rice

Yield:
6 servings

The weather is starting to take a turn, and it’s debatable whether it’s for better or worse. There is a definite bright side, and it’s not the skies: it’s soup season. Right when you’ve started unrolling your blankets, and reminiscing about fire places, that’s the time to stick a pot on the stove top.

I think everyone has a memory of tomato soup warming them up from the inside out. Tomato soup is one of those comfort food classics, that like coke, doesn’t need a new formula.

Tomato soup + me + spoon = happy.

matbucha

That’s why I took the liberty with this recipe to not reinvent the wheel that’s been rolling smoothly; instead I played with it just a touch. While making this soup I couldn’t help but think about matbucha, the tomato based salad Jews have been drowning their challah in for generations throughout the Middle East. Its acidic touch of lemon and hint of cumin is what makes the salad so popular among noshers of all ages.

I added some lemon juice and spices similar to the ones found in matbucha, and some sweet peppers to give it a touch of unexpected flavor that’ll warm you up like an Indian summer.

tomato soup with wild rice

Cumin Spiced Tomato Soup with Wild Rice

Ingredients

1/2 tsp cumin

1 Tbsp paprika

2 Tbsp olive oil

2 Tbsp lemon juice

1 medium purple onion, diced

5 garlic cloves, minced

1 hot pepper, diced (optional)

1 ½ Tbsp sugar

5 plum tomatoes, diced

1 red pepper, diced

1 yellow pepper, diced

3 cups of tomato juice

3 cups of boiling water

Salt and white pepper to taste

1/2 cup of cooked wild rice

Directions

Toast cumin and paprika in large pot on medium heat until fragrant, about three minutes.

Add olive oil and lemon juice to the pot and cook for one minute. Once they are hot, stir in the onion, garlic, and hot pepper if you are using it.

Let your onion mix cook for about 6 minutes or until the onions become translucent.

Mix in your sugar, tomatoes, and sweet peppers. Let them cook for about 6 minutes. They should be done when the tomatoes and peppers have softened slightly.

Add tomato juice and water to the pot. Bring soup to a slow boil. Lower the heat to medium and let it cook uncovered for 40 minutes.

Fill bowls with a few spoonfuls of rice and then ladle soup over it.

Posted on November 6, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Sweet Potato Cupcakes with Toasted Marshmallow Frosting

Yield:
12 cupcakes

Everyone loves cakes and bread made with pumpkin this time of year (especially me). But have you ever tried sweet potato cake? It is not nearly as popular but it is just as delicious as its pumpkin counterpart, if not more so.

The great thing about making dessert with vegetables like pumpkin, sweet potato, butternut squash and zucchini is that due to the vegetables’ water content the recipe will likely call for vegetable oil instead of butter. And therefore these delicious cakes are also perfect pareve dessert choices. No need to scramble to alter the recipe for a meat meal.

cupcakes2

I have been making this recipe for sweet potato cake for years and people are always shocked when I share that the recipe is dairy-free. And now it’s your turn to wow guests with this sweet treat.

When paired with Martha Stewart’s simple Marshmallow Frosting Recipe it makes the perfect Fall dessert. And hey, this totally counts as a serving of vegetables, so have two.

sweet potato cupcakes

 

Sweet Potato Cupcakes with Toasted Marshmallow Frosting

Ingredients

2 medium sweet potatoes

1 ½ cups flour

1 tsp cinnamon

¾ tsp ginger

¼ tsp nutmeg

½ tsp baking powder

½ tsp baking soda

¼ tsp salt

1 cup sugar

½ cup vegetable oil

2 large eggs

1 tsp vanilla extract

Half recipe for Marshmallow Frosting

Equipment: muffin tins, piping bag, hand-held torch

Directions

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Pierce sweet potatoes with a fork and wrap in tin foil. Roast for 40-50 minutes ofr until soft. Let cool.

Cut potatoes in half and scoop out flesh. Place in a food processor fitted with a blade and pulse until smooth.

In a medium bowl, sift together flour, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, baking soda, baking powder and salt.

Add pureed sweet potatoes, sugar and oil to a large bowl. Beat on medium-high speed with an electric mixer until smooth. Add eggs one at a time beating well after each addition. Add vanilla. Add flour mixture in batches; beat just until blended.

Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Line and grease muffin tins. Fill muffin trays until 3/4 full.

Bake for 20 to 25 minutes or until a toothpick inserted comes out cool. Allow to cool.

Make frosting.

Pipe frosting in a swirl on top of each cupcake. Using a hand-held blow torch, gently drag the torch across the frosting, toasting the frosting until just lightly brown.

Posted on October 30, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Privacy Policy