Tag Archives: pareve dessert

Tri-Color Melon Salad with Mint Syrup

Yield:
8-10 servings

Summer is the time for lightening up and taking advantage of all the fresh fruits and vegetables…but that doesn’t mean giving up on delicious treats.

This tri-color melon salad with mint simple syrup is possibly one of the healthiest “desserts” I have ever come up with, but on a hot summer evening nothing could be more refreshing or perfect.

melon-1

Like so many of my recipes, you can definitely improvise based on your own tastes. You don’t have to use honeydew, cantaloupe and watermelon – you can use whatever fruits suit your own palette. And what if you don’t like mint?

Instead of mint you can make a basil lemon simple syrup, a hibiscus simple syrup or just serve plain. Serve it in individual cups, a large bowl or use the leftover melon shells as a festive bowl. I definitely recommend using a handy melon baller to make this salad extra pretty – for less than $10 it’s a little tool that makes a big difference. People will think your dessert is super fancy, but in truth, it’s super simple.

Not only is it sweet and fresh, but it’s nondairy too – perfect after an afternoon barbecue.

melon-3

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Tri-Color Melon Salad with Mint Syrup

Posted on July 21, 2014

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Nutella Babka

Yield:
three loaves

I didn’t grow up baking or even eating babka. Coffee cake, definitely. Banana bread was a staple. But babka just wasn’t something around. When I did finally taste babka as a teenager, I thought: “Where have you been all my life?” Chocolatey, chewy and slightly gooey—it was a perfect Shabbat morning breakfast treat with a cup of tea or coffee.

nutella-babka-2

Recently I’ve been itching to recreate babka at home. I mean, I bake challah every week. Why shouldn’t I tackle babka? But it was harder than I thought. I tried the recipe from Jerusalem. And it was great. But not quite what I was hoping to create.

And then I came across two other recipes: one from Orly Ziv’s Cook in Israel and one from a blog I came across on Instagram: Ba-Li cravings.

nutella-babka-1

My recipe is really a combination of Orly’s genius idea to stuff a babka with nutella, Ba-li’s tried-and-true dough which I have updated only slightly and a technique from Jerusalem that ensures that ooey gooey babka taste and texture we all crave.

This recipe is easily pareve-erized. (Yes, you can make this nondairy.) You can either buy a nondairy hazelnut spread or you can also make your own using a recipe like this one.

It’s perfect to enjoy with a cup of tea of coffee. Or, if you’re like my daughter, you’ll just dig right in.

nutella-babka-5

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Nutella Babka

Posted on May 5, 2014

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Heart-Shaped Linzer Cookies

Yield:
Around 2 dozen cookies

Linzer torte cookies were one of my mom’s go-to recipes that I have fond memories of making with her as a child. We didn’t make them for Valentine’s Day per se, but made them for any special occasion that came up – parties, piano recitals and even rainy Saturdays.

This recipe isn’t quite the same as hers, which unfortunately was lost when she passed away. But it is the closest thing I have found to the buttery cookies we made together during my childhood. I find this version to be particularly versatile because the cookies are excellent made in both dairy and pareve varieties, which cannot be said for every dessert recipe!

linzer-cookies1-stampI actually don’t make these for Valentine’s Day either, but really love to make these cookies for Sheva Berakhot celebrations for friends! But they are also great as a sweet treat for your loved ones on Valentine’s Day, Shabbat or any day you just want to show a little extra lovin’.

I love making these fun square-shaped cookies with just a smidge of sweet jam peeking out from the heart shaped cut-out. But you can have fun and make any shape that suits your fancy.

linzer-cookies2-stamp

Heart-Shaped Linzer Cookies

Posted on February 6, 2014

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Sweet Potato Cupcakes with Toasted Marshmallow Frosting

Yield:
12 cupcakes

Everyone loves cakes and bread made with pumpkin this time of year (especially me). But have you ever tried sweet potato cake? It is not nearly as popular but it is just as delicious as its pumpkin counterpart, if not more so.

The great thing about making dessert with vegetables like pumpkin, sweet potato, butternut squash and zucchini is that due to the vegetables’ water content the recipe will likely call for vegetable oil instead of butter. And therefore these delicious cakes are also perfect pareve dessert choices. No need to scramble to alter the recipe for a meat meal.

cupcakes2

I have been making this recipe for sweet potato cake for years and people are always shocked when I share that the recipe is dairy-free. And now it’s your turn to wow guests with this sweet treat.

When paired with Martha Stewart’s simple Marshmallow Frosting Recipe it makes the perfect Fall dessert. And hey, this totally counts as a serving of vegetables, so have two.

sweet potato cupcakes

 

Sweet Potato Cupcakes with Toasted Marshmallow Frosting

Posted on October 30, 2013

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Stuffed Apples for Sukkot

Did you know that it is traditional to eat stuffed foods on Sukkot?

Originally, I thought it was just because they tasted good. Not quite content, I did a little bit of research and came up with a few answers.

Some say that we eat stuffed cabbage on Simchat Torah because if you put two of these bundles together they look the two tablets of the Ten Commandments.

This answer didn’t thrill me because two store-bought dinner rolls have the same effect, except they don’t require, blood, sweat, and tears to serve them.

A bit more digging and I uncovered another answer: we eat stuffed foods because they symbolize an overwhelming bounty. Fall is when farmers harvest wheat in Israel. A simple vegetable overflowing with delicious filling reminds us of our desire for a year of overflowing harvest.

In biblical times, farmers would put collecting their crops on hold to sit in a sukkah with their family and celebrate Sukkot. Sitting out on the field studying Torah with their children, these farmers were surrounded by two great desires; one, that this year’s harvest would be plentiful and two that like those vegetables, their year would be bursting with moments like that one, doing what they loved most, studying Torah with who they loved most.

In the year 2013, when most of us do not run out to cut wheat, and the closest thing we’ve done to harvesting is scope out sales at the mall, I think it’s time to give this ancient tradition a modern twist – and what better than with dessert!

stuffed apples

This is a healthy autumn dessert that helps you stick to your new year resolutions. Or you can serve it with a side of vanilla ice cream or whipped cream. My favorite part about this recipe is that if I somehow end up with leftovers, I can have dessert for breakfast without even the slightest bit of guilt!

Posted on September 17, 2013

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Honey Pomegranate Cake


I have a love-hate relationship with the High Holidays (who doesn’t!?). It always seems to coincide with a busy time of work and I never have enough time to cook all the recipes I want to try. This year is the first time my husband and I will be celebrating the holidays at home (as opposed to going to family or friends). We are hosting lots of meals, which means I am forced to/have the opportunity to explore new recipes and adapt some of my favorites.

pomegranate glaze

The one thing I make year after year without fail is my mom’s honey cake. It is moist, sweet and the perfect addition to any Rosh Hashanah meal. It is the first thing I eat after the Yom Kippur fast with a big glass of orange juice.  When I think of the holiday season I can smell the honey cake and see my mom’s kitchen counter covered with honey cakes and challah.

This year, I wanted to change up the cake by utilizing the same concept and making it a little more interesting. Here is the recipe for a Honey Pomegranate Cake with a pomegranate glaze on top. You can make the cake ahead of time and freeze it for later, however you should not glaze it until you the day you are serving. honey pomegranate cake 1

Honey Pomegranate Cake

Posted on August 21, 2013

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The Best Apples & Honey Cakes for the New Year

You might still be thinking about summer tomatoes, peach pie, and drinks by the pool, but we are thinking about honey cake and apple desserts since Rosh Hashanah will be upon us in just two weeks!

Apple and honey cakes are traditional, sweet New Year desserts but they can definitely get a bit stale. The honey cake from my childhood? My Great Aunt Ruth would make honey cake sometime around June, cut it into slices, freeze it, and then defrost it in the fall to serve at my grandma’s house for Rosh Hashanah. Is it any wonder honey cake is far from my favorite dessert!?

So I set out to find the freshest, traditional and non-traditional, super scrumptious apples & honey desserts perfect for your Jewish New Year celebrations. Please note: Great Aunt Ruth’s version is not included.

Got a great recipe? Post below and let us know!

apples-galore

 

 

 

Apple Sauce Souffle Bread Pudding

Apple Sauce Cake with Caramel Glaze by The Sassy Radish

Amy’s Bissel Apple Cake

Traditional Apple Cake by Leah Koenig

Mini Apple and Honey Tarts by The Overtime Cook

The Best Apple Cake with Honey, by Rachel Korycan

Apple Crown Cake by Leah Cooks Kosher

Rose Petal Apple Tart

Marie Helen’s Apple Cake by Two Peas and their Pod

Honey Pomegranate Mandelbrot

Mayim Bialik’s Vegan Honey Cake

Majestic and Moist Honey Cake by Smitten Kitchen

Orange Honey Cake by Levana Kirschenbaum

Traditional Honey Cake

Impossible-to-Resist Honey Cake by Kosher Like Me

 

Posted on August 20, 2013

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Chicken Gribenes ‘n Waffles Cupcake

Yield:
8 cupcakes

Don’t get me wrong: I love fresh fruits and veggies. But I also love schmaltz. Not everyday. Not in large doses. But when it’s appropriate, I enjoy taking that fatty, liquid gold and using it for good, not evil.

But you know what I also love? Chicken skin. That is, gribenes. (Yes, me and your grandmother both.) I am always trying to find new uses, including these Deviled Eggs with Schmaltz and Gribenes and my Ultimate Kosher Burger with Grilled Pastrami and Gribenes. Gribenes will never be bacon. But it’s not a bad substitute for something salty and greasy in kosher cooking.

So when I came across this recipe for Chicken N Waffles Cupcake, I was inspired: breakfast + dessert, sweet + savory, all wrapped up in a cupcake. How could I make this kosher?

And then I realized: I shouldn’t just make this cupcake kosher. I should make it Jewish. Really Jewish. And that’s how it was born: My pareve maple gribenes cupcake.

So when my husband came home from the butcher with 2 huge, free* bags of chicken skin I got straight to work. And I must admit, we were a bit frightened by the results.

The cupcake and the frosting are SO good and moist they don’t taste “pareve” at all. But I’ve got to be honest, while the gribenes looked very pretty, we couldn’t decide if we really loved it on top of a cupcake. But novelty wins the day, and this photo makes it all worthwhile:

SONY DSC

I am so happy to have a great new pareve dessert recipe to come out of one my slightly nutty gribenes-inspired ideas. You can choose to include the gribenes, or leave it off all together, but either way, happy cupcake making!

Meanwhile, my quest to use gribenes continues!

How to make your own gribenes? Cut chicken skin into medium size strips. I don’t like cutting them too small, I like a larger piece of skin to crunch on. Heat a large skillet on medium heat and add a scant tsp of oil or chicken fat (schmaltz) into the pan. Add chicken skin and saute 20-25 minutes, scraping frequently with spatula or wooden spoon to avoid  the skin sticking or burning.

When skin is a deep brown and appears crispy, remove with slotted spoon and place onto a paper towel. Sprinkle with a smidge of salt.

Cinnamon Cupcakes with Maple Frosting

Posted on August 5, 2013

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What I’m Cooking for Shabbat

I am actually really excited about our Shabbat dinner tonight. I am trying out some new recipes, and experimenting with some gluten-free dishes now that my sister is on a gluten free and dairy free diet. My idea of Hell is a world where I couldn’t eat bread or dairy desserts.

So what’s on deck for this week’s Shabbat menu?

When I saw this recipe for Indian Barbecue Chicken, I knew I had to make it! Instead of using chicken breasts, I am going to make a whole roasted chicken and then serve the barbecue sauce on the side.

zucchinipasta

My sister has decided she is going to make some Shaved Zucchini Noodles with Kale Pesto. I am eager to see how they turn out. While searching for recipes I also came across this recipe from Whole Food Diary for Zucchini Spaghetti with Roasted Tomatoes and Kale Pesto. It looks incredible, gluten free or not. This recipe has also inspired me to look into buying a “spiralizer” to make cool, uniform veggie pasta!

angel-food-zb-12I have been drooling over this recipe from Zoe Bakes for Citrus Angel Food Cake with Peaches, but I think it is going to have to wait a little while. Frown.

Instead I decided to make this recipe from Whole Foods for non-dairy Rice Pudding, made with coconut milk and cinnamon. I also added a tsp of vanilla extract and star anise for a little extra punch. It smells divine and I can’t wait to serve it to my sister.

Shabbat Shalom and happy cooking!

Posted on June 21, 2013

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Broken Bundt Chocolate Mousse Trifle

Yield:
8-10 servings

I always advise people never to try new things when you are bringing something or hosting a meal. And what did I decide to do? Try a new cake recipe to bring to someone’s house who I had never met. This past Thursday night, I opened my trusty copy of Kosher By Design Entertains and decided to make a simple vanilla and chocolate swirl cake recipe for Shabbat dessert. Easy enough, right? Wrong!

The recipe itself was great – the cake batter was awesome! I mean, obviously I licked the spoon. And then disaster struck: I let the cake cool 15 minutes and removed the cake. And it broke. Broken Bundt. #fail. So now what!?

Well, at 11:00 pm I decided to make another dessert. This time I would make my tried-and-true, always-a-hit salty doubly chocolate chip cookies. Except that somehow I under-baked them too much, and they were more like slightly baked cookie dough rather than perfectly chewy cookies. Yet another fail!

What was going on with me!?

Whenever I am whipping something up in the kitchen, I always post the photos to Instagram (are you following me yet? well why the heck not! Follow me here!). And on Thursday night I posted the photo of my poor, poor broken bundt. And lo and behold, a fellow pareve baker suggested I turn the cake into a trifle. Genius!

And that’s just what I did.

mousse trifle2

Now, the cake recipe is really the least important part. So to make this trifle you can use the same recipe from Kosher By Design Entertains, or you can use a store bought angel food cake or you can even use brownies if you want to be really indulgent.

For you dieters out there….you can actually leave out the cake entirely and simply layer different kinds of fruit together with chocolate mousse and some slivered almonds for crunch. Like a dessert parfait, but with chocolate mousse. Ok, ok, not exactly diet food. But slightly less carb-heavy.

For the trifle I made I used this recipe for the chocolate mousse. But truth be told, usually I live and die by this recipe for Olive oil and chocolate mousse from The New York Times. You can use any mousse recipe that suits you.

Don’t have a trifle dish? You can use just a big glass bowl! I bought mine from Target! But you can also order one from Amazon like this one.

Well, happy broken bundt baking everyone!

Broken Bundt Chocolate Mousse Trifle

Posted on June 11, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy