Tag Archives: latkes

Michelin Star Latkes and Sufganiyot

I have long considered myself somewhat a latke expert, with several varieties under my belt, and never a single latke leftover when serving to my friends and family. That is until I had the chance to spend time with Michelin Star Chef Bill Telepan and Pastry Chef Larissa Raphael of the acclaimed New York City restaurant Telepan last week.

Chef Bill Telepan isn’t Jewish, though his latkes might indicate otherwise. In truth, Bill grew up in suburban New Jersey eating potato pancakes every holiday season prepared by his Hungarian mother. He carries this tradition on with his own family, serving up a big Christmas breakfast of eggs, bacon, pancakes and, what else, latkes.

Telepan latkes2

But he has also been serving up latkes at his restaurant for nearly ten years, and even won an award for his latkes at the Annual Latke Festival in New York City several years ago. He likes serving them two ways: plain with sour cream and homemade applesauce, or as an appetizer with smoked salmon and creme fraiche (a personal favorite).

So what can a Michelin Star chef teach a nice Jewish girl about frying latkes? Well, a lot. And it turns out I had been making a couple of mistakes.

Bill shared that you want to keep the natural potato starch in the mix, but also need to remove excess liquid. After mixing all the latke ingredients, he allows the mix to sit around 5-10 minutes. Then he drains it, mixes the eggs with the leftover potato starch, and adds that back into the potatoes.

Don’t squeeze out too much liquid: I had been squeezing out the liquid from my latke each time I formed a patty, but Bill told me you don’t want to do that, because then the latkes will be dry. Instead, lightly form a patty using your hands or a tablespoon to keep the moisture in, creating a fluffier and creamier latke.

Onion is key for Bill, who uses a ratio of 1 small onion to every 1 ½ lbs of russet potatoes. When I tried out this ratio over the weekend, my dad immediately said “wow, great onion flavor” so I guess Bill is really on to something.

Another key element is adding enough salt, both in the mix of the latkes, and then a small sprinkle after they come out of the hot oil. While 2 tsp of salt for 1 ½ lbs of potatoes may seem like a lot, Bill pointed out that potatoes really absorb the salt and need a little extra to bring out the flavor.

TelepanDonuts2

In my time at the restaurant I also had the chance to spend time with Pastry Chef Larissa Raphael, who has been serving up some of New York City’s best desserts for years, who decided to try her hand at serving Hanukkah jelly donuts this year for the first time.

You have probably had a jelly donut around Hanukkah time. And they are fine, I mean what is bad about fried dough. But what I loved about Larissa’s Hanukkah donuts is the balance of rich chocolate ganache and raspberry jam filling paired with delightfully light, bite-sized donut “holes.” After all eating several small donuts is way more fun than trying to stuff one enormous powder-sugar covered donut into your mouth.

If making donuts from scratch seems like a daunting task, Larissa shared that you can actually allow the dough to rise overnight in the fridge, a helpful tip for the busy home baker.  No fancy oil for this frying: just plain old vegetable oil.

So now you can enjoy Michelin Star quality latkes and Hanukkah donuts all from the comfort of your own home.

Latkes and Hanukkah donuts will be available at Telepan from December 16th to 24th and are available both for take-out and in-house dining. Donuts will only be available for the dinner menu.

TelepanLatkes2

Chef Bill Telepan’s Potato Latkes, Yield: 6 latkes

Ingredients:

1 ½ lbs of Idaho (russet) potatoes

1 small onion

2 eggs

2 Tbsp flour

2 tsp salt

Directions:

Using the large hole on a box grater, grate potatoes and the onions into a mixing bowl.

Squeeze the grated potatoes and onion and save the water from the potatoes.  After the water from the potatoes has settled, pour off the water and save the  starch which settled to the bottom.

Beat the eggs and add them to the starch and combine well.  Add the flour and salt and combine all.

Pan fry in a sauté pan in a generous amount of vegetable oil until golden brown and crispy on the outside, and cooking through on the inside.

Larissa Raphael’s Chocolate and Raspberry Sufganiyot

Posted on December 15, 2014

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Loaded Baked Potato Latkes

Yield:
2 dozen latkes

Loaded Baked Potato Latkes3 w text

Loaded baked potatoes have always intrigued me. There are tons of vegetarian versions to enjoy, but there is something about the classic version that always captured my attention: steaming hot with melted cheddar cheese, a big dollop of sour cream, and of course, crispy bacon on top.

So I decided to take the plunge, and turn my affection-from-afar for the loaded baked potato into a latke version. The classic potato latke got a makeover with some grated cheddar cheese and scallions, and then I topped it all with tangy sour cream, more scallions and bacon bits. Ok everyone, don’t get your panties in a twist. Not real bacon: the fake kind they sell in the salad dressing aisle.

Loaded Baked Potato Latkes1

Of course, what could be bad about this combination of ingredients? Pretty much nothing.

An unexpected surprise of this recipe? The red and green from the scallions and bacon bits create a little Chrismukkah action. So for those of you who might be from interfaith families, or just like getting into the red and green holiday spirit, this recipe has your name all over it.

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Loaded Baked Potato Latkes

Posted on December 14, 2014

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Grilled Cheese Latkes

Yield:
4-5 latke sandwiches

There’s just something about comfort food that always gets me excited to eat. Give me some mac n’ cheese, tuna casserole or a grilled cheese sandwich and I am good to go. Can you tell that I love dairy? Hanukkah, which is traditionally celebrated with oily and cheesy foods, really is the perfect holiday for me! 

Grilled Cheese Latkes Nosher2

On Hanukkah we eat foods fried in oil to symbolize the oil that lasted eight days when the Maccabees rededicated the Holy Temple in Jerusalem after their victory over the Greeks. The dairy is to celebrate Judith’s victory when she saved her village from the Babylonians. Basically, she served the General of the Babylonian army a basket of wine and salty cheese (the salt made him thirsty and got him very drunk). When he passed out, she beheaded him and scared away his army. It’s a bit graphic but definitely worth celebrating!

Grilled Cheese Latkes Nosher3

So now let’s get back to my comfort food, which really does tie in to Hanukkah beautifully. I decided that what this holiday really needed was a crispy latke fried in oil then sandwiched together with cheese. Sounds good, right?!? Jewish-American comfort food taken to the max.

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Grilled Cheese Latkes

Posted on December 4, 2014

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Pulled Brisket-Topped Latkes

Yield:
4 dozen latkes

I would like to say that this is the first time I have combined brisket and latkes into one recipe, but I would be lying. I just love finding ways to use brisket, like the brisket latkes I created last year and one of my newer creations: brisket-stuffed cabbage.

SONY DSC

Like so many great recipes, this one was created by accident. At a Hanukkah party several years ago I served potato latkes, pulled brisket and some homemade challah rolls. Pretty soon my friends ditched the rolls and started topping their latkes with the brisket. And a new star was born.

If you are asking yourself, “can I use my family’s beloved brisket recipe for this?” The answer is absolutely. As long as the recipe calls for a significant amount of liquid so that it has a bit of sauce to it, whatever recipe you fancy will work great.

You don’t have to stop with brisket as a topping for your latkes. You can make a “top your own latke” party this Hanukkah season, serving up grilled pastrami, pulled brisket, caramelized onions or any other fun topping you like. Watch as your guests get creative with their latkes. You can also shake it up by adding some sweet potato latkes or parsnip latkes into the mix.

SONY DSC Love Jewish food? Sign up for our weekly Nosher recipe newsletter!

Pulled Brisket-Topped Latkes

Posted on December 1, 2014

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Post-Hanukkah Detox

Tonight is the last night of Hanukkah. Sigh. This has been such an exciting year to celebrate. But between Thanksgiving, the long holiday weekend and eight nights of latkes and sufganiyot, my stomach is sure ready to move on to lighter fare.

I’ve put together some of my favorite healthful eating ideas to help you detox from the eating debuachery of the past week. Got a great a recipe to get our eating on track? Post below and let us know!

For breakfast:

Detox Very Berry Smoothie

Shannon’s Health(ier) Pancakes

smoothie horizontal

For lunch:

Roasted Eggplant and Chickpea Soup from Martha Stewart

Raw Kale Salad with Lentils and Apricot Vinaigrette from Food52

kale lentil salad

Dinner ideas:

Roasted Butternut Squash and Kale Pizza from Bev Cooks

Quinoa with Pesto and Greens

Best Roasted Chicken

Don’t forget dessert: Strawberry Lemon Granita

granita 1

Posted on December 4, 2013

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Eight Crazy Nights of Latkes

Is there anything more enticing than a perfectly fried, crispy potato latke? Served with apple sauce, sour cream or my own favorite combo: creme fraiche and smoked salmon. Look at these crispy, golden gems. Makes me drool a little just thinking about breaking out the oil.

SONY DSCBut there is so much more than the basic latke, as delicious as it may be. So if you have been hankering for something different to serve for your Hanukkah (or even Thanksgivukkah) celebration next month, I’ve got you covered.

I have been scouring the internet and other blogs for the most creative, crazy latke combos that exist. And here they are in all their awesome glory. You’re welcome.

eight crazy latkes

Coconut Latkes with Cranberry Applesauce & Cardamom Mascarpone from What Jew Wanna Eat

Latke Crusted Apple Stuffing

Leftover Mashed Potato Latkes from Andrea’s Garden Cooking

Parsnip Sweet Potato Latkes

Apple and Cheese Stuffed Latkes from The Kitchn

Potato Latke Sandwiches with Smoked Salmon

Carrot Rosemary Potato Latkes

Sweet Potato Latkes with Brown Sugar Syrup & Candied Pecans from The Shiksa
Sweet-Potato-Latkes-with-Brown-Sugar-Syrup-640x480

Posted on October 29, 2013

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Hanukkah Brunch!

Every year at the holidays it seems like our lives get busier and busier and so we have to find creative ways to get all our friends and family visits in during Hanukkah. This year is no different, in fact it was even busier now that we have a new baby!

So in order to fit in a visit with some of our close friends we decided to host a Hanukkah brunch -latkes for breakfast, my favorite kind!

Last year for our latke-breakfast combo we served my classic (amazing) latkes with smoked salmon and poached eggs. But this year we wanted to do something slightly different.

First, we decided to make two different kinds of latkes – my husband tried out a recipe  for Balkan Potato Leek Latkes from Janna Gur’s The Book of New Israeli Food. These latkes are made by cooking, then mashing the potatoes, dipping in egg and flour and then frying them. They tasted like a mashed-potato fritter. They were good, but we decided we liked our classic shredded style latke better.

And to accompany my more traditional latkes we decided to make two different condiments: tzatziki and Amy Kritzer’s cranberry-applesauce. The cranberry applesauce was so good there wasn’t a drop left! If you are still frying up some latkes during the rest of Hanukkah I definitely recommend whipping up a batch – its very easy and doesn’t take long at all on the stove.

Last weekend the husband and I were watching Rachel Khoo’s “Little Paris Kitchen” on The Cooking Channel (sidenote: what a great show! definitely check it out) when we came across her “Croque Madame Cups,” where she butters white bread, sticks it in muffin tins and then bakes eggs (ham) and bechamel for a heavenly little egg cup. We knew at once we HAD to make them.

And thank goodness we did – they are absolutely our new favorite recipe. We did not use any kind of meat product, but you could substitute spinach, mushrooms or even smoked salmon for the ham she uses. They truly are two-bites of rich, creamy delight-fulness.

Also included on our Hanukkah brunch table? Mimosas, Israeli salad and some homemade cookies for dessert.

Hope everyone is enjoying Hanukkah, whatever time of day you serve the latkes!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted on December 10, 2012

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Shabbat Menu Roundup—Comfort Food Edition

For me, February is prime comfort food month, so this Shabbat I’m thinking about yummy comfort foods I can serve to my guests.

Tomato soup is the consummate comfort food, but this recipe from Not Derby Pie looks exciting, even controversial. Can’t wait to try it.

I actually tried making this cheesy pull-apart bread from Beantown Baker last night for a friend and it was a huge success. I bet it would be amazing made with a challah and served with the soup.

Then I’m thinking this artichoke tart with polenta crust from the Wednesday chef, which looks decadent and divine.

For a side, I like these zucchini and carrot fritters I saw in The Kitchn. Like healthier latkes! And who doesn’t like latkes?

And then for dessert, these Dark Chocolate Brownies with Raspberry Goat Cheese Swirl have stolen my heart, and I don’t think I’ll be able to recover until I make them and wallow in them for a nice long time. Amiright?

Happy cooking!

Posted on February 9, 2012

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How to Make the Perfect Latke

I recently told my parents that they cursed me. The way I see it, when my (probable) Irish genes collided with my (definite) Eastern European genes, I was pre-destined to have a love affair with the potato.

My parents blush and look a little embarrassed when you ask them what my first un-coached word was. Not because it was uncouth, or racy, but because my first un-coached utterance was spoken as we drove past a Burger King. Ladies and gentleman, my first word was “fry”– as in french fry.

Now, my family isn’t really into fried foods. If we have a craving for french fries or onion rings, we go out to our favorite fast food joint or restaurant. We don’t ever fry anything at home; we leave it to the professionals. But, when I was growing up, come Hanukkah we’d open all the windows (a feat in the sometimes sub-zero Ohio winters), close the doors to the bedrooms, and my dad would spend several nights frying up latke after latke.

I love my dad’s latkes. As a child (and, maybe even as an adult) I would gobble them down, often leaving my mom’s brisket (also incredible) untouched. Eventually, we just started having latke-only dinners a few times each Hanukkah.

Everyone has “the perfect” latke recipe, so I won’t attempt to prove my family’s recipe is better than yours. I will, however, share a few of our latke tips with you”

– Do not peel your potatoes
– Salt the potatoes after grating them, let them sit for about 20
mintues, then squeeze as much of the water out as possible
– Grate your onions (juice and all) directly into your squeezed-out potatoes
– Use only a little matzo meal to bind the batter, don’t let the matzo
meal overcome the potatoey-ness
– Fry the latkes in corn oil
– After you fry, pat off excess oil with paper towels
– To keep warm and crispy, place latkes on cookie racks in a 250 degree oven

Rachel Korycan lives in Washington, D.C. and is a Development Coordinator at The Jewish Federation of Greater Washington.

Want some additional tricks for making latkes? Check out this video that purports to give you foolproof latke tips.

Posted on December 6, 2011

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