Tag Archives: kosher brisket recipe

Brisket Contest Winner!

Yield:
12-16 servings



After reviewing dozens of brisket recipes, I still can’t believe how many variations of the same dish will grace Jewish families’ dinner tables on Sunday night to celebrate the Jewish New Year.

It was really hard to choose, but we are excited to share with you Maureen Sharon’s  Brisket with Tsimmis recipe. Maureen shared that it is her family’ absolute favorite, and perhaps it will become your family’s new favorite too!

We hope you enjoy this special family recipe and enjoy whatever meals you share with loved ones next week. Happy cooking – Happy New Year!

Maureen Sharon's Brisket with Tsimmis

Ingredients

1 6 pound brisket

1 Tbsp crushed garlic

1 tsp salt

1 tsp pepper

½ tsp paprika

½ tsp thyme

4 large Onions, sliced into rings

6 stalks celery, sliced

1 lb carrots, sliced (or use whole baby carrots)

12 oz can of tomatoes, stewed or plain

1 cup brewed extra strong coffee

½ cup sweet kosher wine such as Manischewitz

1-2 packages of dried fruit assortment (plums, apricots, etc.)

1-2 lbs small whole yukon gold or red potatoes

2 large yams, cut into chunks

½ cup balsamic vinegar (optional)

½ cup honey (optional)

Directions

Rinse and dry the meat and trim fat to your liking. Rub with crushed garlic, salt and pepper to taste. Preheat oven to 300 degrees.

Cover the bottom of your roasting pan (I often use a large disposable aluminum baking pan) with about 2/3 of the sliced onions, celery, and some of the carrots. Arrange the brisket on top, and scatter remaining onions, celery, carrots and spices/herbs on top. Add half of the dried fruit and all the tomatoes. Pour in the coffee and wine. Cover pan with lid or with heavy duty foil and make sure you have a tight seal.

After 2 ½ hours check for doneness with a fork. If the fork goes in fairly easily, you can remove the meat, let rest for 20 minutes, then slice the brisket against the grain. This is a good dish to make ahead of time. You can either refrigerate overnight or freeze. Store the brisket and sauce/vegetables and fruit (tsimmis) separately. Defrost thoroughly before completing the dish.

Return the sliced brisket to the pan. Add potatoes, yams, the other half of the dried fruit, and more sliced celery and carrots. Recover the pan and cook for at least another hour or two until potatoes are tender.

The vegetables and fruit can be served separately as a tsimmis side dish. You can keep the brisket in a low oven (200° F) for several hours to keep warm.

If you like sweet/sour flavors, add ½ cup Balsamic vinegar before cooking and ½ cup honey during the final reheating stage. Be sure to taste and adjust seasoning, adding more honey or vinegar to taste.

Brisket tends to shrink a good deal while cooking, so figure 2-3 servings per pound.
Rinse and dry the meat and trim as much fat as you like. Rub with garlic salt or crushed
garlic, salt and pepper to taste. Preheat oven to 300° F. 

Cover the bottom of your roasting pan (I often use a large disposable aluminum baking
pan) with about 2/3 of the sliced onions, celery, and some of the carrots. Arrange the
brisket on top, and scatter remaining onions, celery, carrots and spices/herbs on top. Add
some of the dried fruit and the tomatoes. Pour in the coffee and wine. Cover pan with lid
or with heavy duty foil. You want a tight seal. After 2 ½ hours check for doneness with
a fork. If the fork goes in fairly easily, you can remove the meat, let rest for 20 minutes,
then slice the brisket against the grain. This is a good dish to make ahead of time. You
can either refrigerate overnight or freeze. Store the brisket and sauce/vegetables and fruit
(tsimmis) separately. Defrost thoroughly before completing the dish.

Return the sliced brisket to the pan. This is the time to add potatoes, yams, the rest of
the dried fruit, and more sliced celery and carrots. Recover the pan and cook for at least
another hour or two until potatoes are tender. The meat is delicious with the sauce. The
vegetables and fruit can be served separately as a wonderful tsimmis. You can keep the
brisket in a low oven (200° F) for hours. Since it’s already sliced, it is easy to serve. It
tastes even better the next day. Enjoy.

If you like sweet/sour flavors, add ½ cup Balsamic vinegar before cooking and ½ cup
honey during the final reheating stage. Be sure to taste and adjust seasoning, adding
more honey or vinegar as desired.

Posted on September 13, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Crockpot Sweet and Sour Brisket



Growing up Rosh Hashanah always meant a trip to grandma’s house. Ten kids running around, 8 adults, games, music, naps on the living room floor after temple and of course a whole lot of food.

Grandma always had a spread. Matzo ball soup, brisket, chicken, kasha, roasted vegetables, salads, potatoes. Every year grandma out did herself. Her meals evolved and as the ten of us got older, there seemed to be more and more food (and no leftovers the following day).

crockpot brisket

As we all got older, got married, moved, had lots of kids, joined different temples, our traditions changed. Grandma now comes to our houses. For a change, we finally get to feed her and she gets to sit back and enjoy as we did when we were children.

Figuring out how grandma made her brisket was always a challenge. If you have ever seen the show “Everyone Loves Raymond” you kind of get the idea of where this is going. She might have given you the recipe but it never tastes the same. I tried for years. Maybe it was the love she put into it, maybe she left out an ingredient, I will never know, but now it was up to me to figure it out.

One of my favorite things about cooking now for the holidays is I get to take all these traditional foods that grandma once made and put a nice modern twist on it. Her chicken liver that made all the kids cringe, now we make it vegetarian and it’s gone within seconds, the potatoes that were smothered in mushrooms and onions, now are plain and simple. The brisket that she made, you know the one that sat in the oven all day, now is made in a crock pot. I still cook with the love, but with a modern twist, easy, simple, throw together in the morning and come home from temple and serve.

Crockpot Sweet and Sour Brisket

Ingredients

3 pounds of brisket

2 large onions

6 carrots cut into matchsticks

5 stalks of celery chopped (plus leaves if you have some)

6 cloves garlic chopped

1/4 cup of dried cranberries

6 Tbsp of cider vinegar

1/4 cup brown sugar

1/2 cup ketchup

3/4 cup stock (I used chicken)

3/4 cup red wine

A handful of fresh cut herbs (I used parsley and tarragon)

Directions

Heat up a large skillet and add 1 tablespoon of oil. Spinkle all sides of your brisket with a couple pinches of salt and pepper. Add brisket to the sauté pan and brown on both sides (about 5 minutes per side). When brisket is browned, add to crock pot.

In same skillet, add a touch more oil and sauté onions, celery, carrots and garlic for about 5-10 minutes, cooking the vegetables just a touch.

Meanwhile in measuring cup add wine, stock, brown sugar, ketchup and vinegar. Whisk and set aside.

When vegetables are done add cranberries and cook for another minute. Pour in the wine mixture and add herbs, bring to a boil.

Carefully pour vegetables and sauce over brisket, cook high 4-6 hours or on low 8-10 hours.

When done, take out meat, let cool for 5 minutes or until easy to handle, cut, plate and spoon some vegetables over with a touch of gravy.

I like to serve the brisket on a large plate with a little gravy and all the vegetables surrounding the cut up brisket. I put the rest of the gravy in a serving bowl or serving container so my guests can enjoy some extra gravy on the side.

 

note on brisket: this dish can also be frozen if you wanted to prepare ahead. I would recommend using one of those throw away tins (which makes for easy clean up). Place meat into tin, pour over sauce and when cool freeze. The morning of your dinner, take out to thaw and heat up in the oven till warm.

Posted on September 10, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Pomegranate Brisket with Cranberry Succotash

Prep:
30 minutes

Cook:
3-3 1/2 hours

Yield:
4 servings



Rosh Hoshanah is one of my favorite Jewish holidays to cook for. Each year I look forward to the Fall smells, sense of renewal, traditions and of course eating lots of apples and honey. Now that I live in Texas, I sadly do not always get to spend the New Year with my family back east. But I do always take the opportunity to dream up a new version of my favorite main dish – brisket. In Texas, brisket is BBQ king.

Slowly smoked until it nearly falls apart and then smothered in a sweet and tangy sauce. I, of course, braise my brisket and enjoy feeding it to doubtful locals who are always won over by the tender meat and sweeter accompanying sauce. Plus, no special equipment besides an oven required!

I have wanted to try to create a pomegranate brisket for some time as a nod to the Rosh Hoshanah tradition to eat fruit that has just recently come into season. The pomegranate is often used for this purpose! Pomegranates are a little tricky to find in Texas, but the juice is plentiful and makes a perfect braising liquid. Served with pan juices and a crunchy, fresh succotash, this brisket is a new spin on an old favorite. If you have access to pomegranates, feel free to replace the dried cranberries with fresh pomegranate arils. This recipe can be doubled to feed a crowd, but remember the cooking time will be longer too.

Amy Kritzer is a food writer and recipe developer in Austin, TX who enjoys cooking, theme parties and cowboys. She challenges herself to put a spin on her grandmother’s traditional Jewish recipes and blogs about her endeavors at What Jew Wanna Eat. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook and watch her cooking videos on Google+.

Pomegranate Brisket with Cranberry Succotash

Ingredients

4-pound brisket
Salt and pepper
2 Tbsp grapeseed oil
2 medium white onions, chopped into large pieces
2 garlic cloves, minced
2 cups pomegranate juice
½ cup dry red wine
1-2 cups chicken broth
2 sprigs rosemary
2 springs thyme
2 ears corn, shucked and removed from the cob
1 cup dried cranberries (or fresh pomegranate arils)
2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
2 tsp honey
2 tsp red wine vinegar
¼ cup cilantro, minced
Salt to taste

Directions

Preheat oven to 275 degrees F.

Season brisket on all sides with salt and pepper.

In a large Dutch oven or oven-safe pot, heat the grapeseed oil over medium-high heat and brown the brisket on all sides, or about 5 minutes per side.

Remove the brisket to rest, and add in onions and garlic. Sauté until browned, about 5 minutes.

Add brisket back in over the vegetables fat side down and cover with pomegranate juice, red wine, and enough chicken broth so the brisket is covered about ¾ of the way. Add in rosemary and thyme.

Cover the brisket and braise in the pre-heated oven for 3- 3.5 hours or until fork tender.

Once cooked, remove brisket to rest and heat pan juices over medium- high heat until reduced by at least half and sauce is thickened. Strain and add salt and pepper if needed.

In a bowl, combine corn and cranberries.

In a separate bowl, whisk together extra virgin olive oil, honey, and red wine vinegar. Toss with corn mixture and add in cilantro and salt to taste.

Once brisket has cooled, sliced against the grain and top with sauce and succotash. It is best reheated in a 200 degree F oven covered in its sauce to retain moisture. Enjoy!

Posted on September 5, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Shabbat Recipe Roundup: Kosher BBQ!

I am sure we’ve all had our share of hamburgers, hot dogs and other grilled treats this summer, but how about a Southern style barbecue Shabbat!

Trade in the challah this week for some corn bread from The Parve Baker.

And what Southern themed meal would be complete without collard greens? Thankfully The Food Network has a vegetarian version – so instead of 1 Tbsp olive oil plus 1 Tbsp butter just use 2 Tbsp olive oil to make this pareve.

Admittedly this recipe for Barbecued Brisket and Burnt Ends will take you a long time, but no pain no gain – if you want some authentic barbecued brisket you are gonna have to put in some time! Serve a simple Green Bean and Tomato Salad with Tarragon Dressing on the side.

No barbecue would be complete without pie at the end and this pareve Peanut Butter Fudge Ice Cream Pie from Couldn’t Be Parve couldn’t be more perfect.

Shabbat Shalom and happy cooking!

 

Posted on August 2, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

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