Tag Archives: Jewish Thanksgiving

Sweet Potato Latkes With Toasted Marshmallows

Yield:
12 latkes

When I was brainstorming my Thanksgivukkah menu I kept dwelling on one of my favorite childhood holiday dishes – what my family calls “Sweet Potato Yum Yum” (or what another family might call sweet potato casserole). You are probably familiar with the heavenly combination of pureed sweet potatoes, margarine, brown sugar and spices, topped with marshmallows and baked to sweet, melted perfection.

Combining the flavors from my family’s Sweet Potato Yum Yum into individual-sized sweet potato latkes topped with toast marshmallows seemed like the perfect crowd-pleasing dish to mark this once-in-a-lifetime holiday. And it is. Happy Thanksgivukkah!

Sweet Potato Latkes3

 

Reprinted courtesy of www.thebigfatjewishwedding.com

Sweet Potato Latkes With Toasted Marshmallows

Ingredients

1 lb sweet potatoes

1/3 cup all-purpose flour

2 large eggs

½ tsp salt

1 heaping tsp pumpkin pie spice

2 Tbsp brown sugar

3/4 cup vegetable oil

Mini marshmallows

Directions

Peel and coarsely grate the sweet potatoes.

Place grated potatoes in a dish towel and wring out as much excess liquid as possible. This step is key to making sure your latkes are crispy. In a medium bowl stir together potatoes, flour, salt, pumpkin pie spice and brown sugar. Lightly beat eggs in a small bowl. Fold eggs into potato mixture until combined.

Heat oil in a deep skillet over moderately high heat.

Check to see if oil is hot enough by putting a small drop of the potato mixture in the oil. If it starts bubbling it is ready for frying.

Spoon approximately 1/8 cup potato mixture per latke into the oil. Flatten with a spatula and don’t crowd the pan otherwise the latkes won’t crispy properly.

Reduce heat to medium and cook until golden brown, about 1- 2 minutes per side.

Transfer latkes to a cookie rack to cool.

Turn on your oven’s broiler. Place latkes on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and top each latke with marshmallows. Place latkes with marshmallows in the oven and watch carefully to make sure the marshmallows don’t brown too much.

Once marshmallows toasted until just brown, remove from oven and serve.

Posted on November 25, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Mashed Potato, Turkey and Cranberry Knishes with Cranberry Mustard

Yield:
18 appetizer-sized knishes

Is there anything better than waking up the day after Thanksgiving and raiding the fridge full of leftovers while everyone else is elbowing one another at the mall?

My favorite Thanksgiving leftovers were always the excess crescent rolls slathered in butter next to some stuffing and a heaping pile of glazed sweet potatoes. A few carbs during the holidays never hurt anyone. But there comes a point sometime on the Saturday or Sunday after Thanksgiving where you just can’t look at another plate of turkey and glazed sweet potatoes. You are craving something different, but ahhh – who wants to waste all those leftover?

Fret no more because I have your solution: bite-sized Thanksgiving knishes made with leftover mashed potatoes, turkey and cranberry sauce. Combine these mini treats with some cranberry mustard dipping sauce and leftovers never sounded so good!

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Other variations:

  • Substitute the mashed potatoes with leftover stuffing or mashed sweet potatoes.
  • Substitute the cranberry sauce inside the knishes for leftover gravy.

The possibilities are endless, or at least as endless as your leftovers.

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Mashed Potato, Turkey and Cranberry Knishes with Cranberry Mustard

Ingredients

2 sheets puff pastry, thawed for 30 minutes

1 cup cranberry sauce, divided

1 Tbsp Dijon mustard

½ tsp whole grain mustard

½ cup leftover mashed potato

½ - ¾ cup leftover turkey, diced

1 egg, beaten

All purpose flour for rolling out puff pastry

Directions

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

On a lightly floured surface, roll out the puff pastry on all sides so that dough stretches slightly. Cut into 9 even squares.

Using fingers stretch each square just a little bit more. Add tsp of mashed potatoes, a few pieces of turkey and tsp of cranberry sauce onn each square.

Fold each point of the puff pastry up and pinch at the top. Twist puff pastry and then push down. Repeat.

Brush each knish with beaten egg.

Bake for 30-35 minutes, until golden brown.

While knishes bake, mix ½ cup cranberry sauce with 1 Tbsp Dijon mustard and ½ tsp whole grain mustard. Spicy brown mustard can also be substituted. Whisk together until smooth.

Serve knishes while warm with cranberry mustard.

Posted on November 24, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Cakey Crunch Sweet Potato Kugel

Yield:
16 servings

Most of my favorite recipes use wholesome, healthful ingredients that are local and seasonal. I don’t buy a lot of processed products or packaged snacks. I truly enjoy making things from scratch.

But once in awhile I find a recipe or a product that I simple cannot resist. Oreo cookies. Entenmanns’s Cheese Danish Twist. And most recently a sweet potato kugel my mother-in-law made last year using sweet potatoes, marshmallows and a box of cake mix.

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My sister-in-law and I sat at one end of the long kitchen table with two heaping platefuls of the addictive kugel, unable to prevent ourselves from eating yet another serving.

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Soon after the sweet potato kugel binge, I fell asleep with my daughter upstairs for a full hour and a half. Forget the turkey-induced snooze fest…my kugel nap was just divine.

I convinced my mother-in-law to hand over the recipe, and with just a few small tweaks, I share it with you all. But I warn you: there is no going back. Make this at your own risk. You may not be able to put down your fork.

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Cakey Crunch Sweet Potato Kugel

Ingredients

8 medium sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into quarters

1 Tbsp vanilla extract

3-4 heaping Tbsp brown sugar

¼ tsp nutmeg

½ tsp kosher salt

¼ cup orange juice or orange-flavored liqueur

8 oz mini marshmallows

1 box yellow cake mix

2 sticks margarine or butter, melted

Directions

Boil sweet potatoes in large pot of water until tender, around 20-25 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

Drain the sweet potatoes and mash in a large bowl. Add vanilla, brown sugar, nutmeg, salt and orange juice or orange-flavored liqueur and mix well.

Grease a 9x11 baking dish. Layer half of the sweet potato mixture evenly in the baking dish.

Sprinkle marshmallows over the top. Add remaining sweet potato mixture on top of marshmallows and spread evenly using an off-set spatula or knife.

Sprinkle yellow cake mix evenly over the top of sweet potato mixture. Pour melted butter or margarine evenly over the top of the cake mix.

Bake for 60 minutes. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Posted on November 20, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Bourbon Pecan and Chocolate Gelt Pie

Yield:
8 servings

Wondering what to do with all your leftover gelt after making the DIY Thanksgivukkah table runner? I’ve got the perfect pie recipe to use up those chocolates!

GeltPie

Both decadent and delicious, this Bourbon Pecan and Gelt Pie is the perfect way to end your Thanksgivukkah meal this holiday season. To create this recipe, I combined a classic pecan pie with some chocolate gelt candy and then added a touch of Bourbon for a little something extra.

Just like Thanksgivukkah itself, everyone is sure to love it!

BurbounPecanandGelt

 

Bourban Pecan and Chocolate Gelt Pie

Ingredients

For the crust:

2 cups of flour, plus extra for rolling out the dough

1 tsp salt

1 tsp sugar

2/3 cup cold shortening

7 Tbsp milk. Almond milk is a great non-dairy alternative.

For the filling:

1/3 cup melted butter or margarine

2/3 cup sugar

1 cup light corn syrup

½ tsp salt

3 eggs

1-2 Tbsp bourbon

20-25 pieces of gelt—enough to cover the bottom of the crust. (You can order pareve gelt online.)

½ cup chopped pecans

½ cup halved pecans

Directions

To make the crust:

Whisk together flour, salt and sugar. Cut shortening into the flour mixture until it is almost incorporated.

Add milk and mix until just combined. You do not want to over mix here, or the crust will be rubbery. Form a large ball with the dough and place in the middle of a flat surface covered with flour.

With a rolling pin, roll the dough out until it is about 2 inches larger than the upside down pie plate. Once it is big enough, flip the pie plate back over and lay the dough in the plate lightly pushing it to the bottom and the sides.

With a fork, poke a few holes in the bottom of the crust and push the sides of the crust into the side of the plate. Then, to make the lip of the pie look fancy, use the fork to make marks in the dough on the lip of the plate (picture shown) and rip off any excess dough. Set aside for filling.

Note: You can also use the extra dough to make decorations. Roll out the extra dough and cut out any shape you want – here I used a turkey. With a fork, mix 1 egg and 1 Tbsp of water. Lightly brush a small amount of the eff mixture over the cut out and then sprinkle with sugar. Bake at 375 until golden brown (about 2-5 minutes depending on how big your cut out is).

To make the filling and assemble pie:

Mix melted butter or margarine and corn syrup together until it has a glossy look. Add salt and sugar and mix until it is completely integrated into the mixture. Mix in eggs and bourbon until the entire mixture is a pale yellow color (no darker yellow egg streaks). Set aside.

Start filling the crust by placing the unwrapped gelt at the bottom of the pie crust. Add both chopped and halved pecans. Then add filling mixture.

Bake at 375 degrees for 45 minutes to an hour. The edges of the crust should be a golden brown and the filling should be completely congealed.

Posted on November 10, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

DIY Thanksgivukkah Tablescape Ideas

I am so excited Hanukkah and Thanksgiving decided to team up this year and give us the ultimate holiday: Thanksgivukkah! And since this holiday will not happen again for another 70,000 years, we decided to really do it up. We set up a beautiful table inspired by the traditions of both holidays, and gave you some DIY’s so you can bring this Thanksgivukkah spirit to your own home.

Thanksgivukkah Gelt Table Runner

DIY STEPS FOR HANUKKAH GELT TABLE RUNNER

1.& 2. Staple together cardstock to create a base. We used 3 pieces of 11×14 cardstock, but you can customize the size of the paper and the length of the base for your own table. Carefully unwrap all gelt – you will need both wrapper pieces intact.

3.Fold down all edges flat against the underside [silver side] of the wrapper.

4. Separate the designs into two piles, matching like with like. Using pieces from one pile, lay down a row of wrappers from edge to edge of cardstock. With a hot glue gun, attach the row to cardstock. Lay a second row over the first using pieces from the other pile.

5.Continue to scallop the rows, alternating designs.

6. Place along center of table, and voila! You have your very own gelt table runner.

 

GELTDIYalt

 

DIY STEPS FOR METALLIC FEATHER PLACE CARDS

1.Lay feathers out along bottom of a cardboard box. Using painter’s tape, cover about 2/3 of each feather completely. Tape just below the exposed feather tip at an angle for an artistic flair.

2. Coat the exposed tips of the feathers with metallic spray paint.

3. Allow to dry fully before gently peeling off painters tape.

4. Thread name cards* with craft wire, cut into approximately 6 inch pieces.

5.Align name card at base of feather.

6. Wrap entire length of wire around base to secure name card to feather, then place atop the dish or plate at each setting.

*We printed our name cards, but you can write guests’ names on cardstock of any size.

FEATHERDIY


Posted on November 4, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Orange Cranberry Thanksgivukah Jelly Doughnuts

Yield:
12-15 doughnuts

Thanksgivukah is taking over: the menurkey (turkey + menorah) is the coveted item of the season and the interwebs are exploding with recipes, decorating ideas and kitschy paraphernalia to celebrate this “once in an eternity” event.

Not being one to turn up my nose at a Jewish fad, I set out to come up with my own perfect Thanksgivukah recipe.

I didn’t want to come up with some turkey-topped latke or cranberry Manischewitz sangria (although those are good ideas too). I wanted to think a bit sweet, since dessert is always my go-to. Pumpkin pie is my favorite traditional Thanksgiving dessert. But yet again, my mind kept straying to something slightly different. I thought…jelly doughnut…cranberry relish…it seemed almost too obvious.

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Cranberry relish-filled sufganiyot might not be the right dessert to serve right after a big Thanksgiving meal, since they really need to be fried fresh. But they are a perfect Thanksgiving brunch option. Or even a great activity for your family the day after since you can use up that leftover cranberry relish!

If you make a chunky relish like this

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then just puree the leftovers to use as the doughnut filling. If your relish is already smooth, then one less step!

Another tip: when filling the doughnuts it might seem like you are over-stuffing with relish, but you will want to make sure you are not skimping on the filling. When you insert the wooden skewer, wiggle it around a bit in the middle to create a relish-ready cavern. And don’t try to be too delicate with the piping bag – get it in there and squeeze away.

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Orange Cranberry Relish Sufganiyot

Ingredients

For the cranberry relish:

12 ounces fresh or frozen cranberries

½ cup fresh orange juice

1 Tbsp grated orange zest

1 cup sugar

Pinch salt

1 tsp corn starch

For the dough:

2 Tbsp dry yeast

½ cup lukewarm water

¼ cup plus 1 tsp sugar

2 ½ cup all-purpose flour

2 eggs

½ tsp ground cinnamon

¼ tsp nutmeg

2 tsp salt

2 Tbsp butter, softened

Vegetable oil for frying

Special equipment: wooden skewer, piping bag, round piping tip

Directions

To make the relish: Add cranberries, orange juice, orange zest and sugar in a saucepan over medium-high heat. Bring to a low boil and continue to simmer for around 5 minutes. Add corn starch and stir vigorously. Cook another 5 minutes or until cranberries have completely softened.

Remove from heat. Place cover on pot and let the cranberries sit for another 5 minutes.

Allow the cranberries to cool slightly.

Place cranberry mixture into food processor fitted with a blade. Pulse until completely smooth. Chill.

To make the dough: In a small bowl combine yeast and warm water. Sprinkle sugar on top and mix lightly. Allow to sit until foamy, around 10 minutes.

When yeast mixture is ready, in a large bowl combine flour, cinnamon, nutmeg, salt, eggs, butter and yeast mixture using a wooden spoon until a sticky dough forms.

On a floured surface knead dough until it is smooth, shiny and bounces back when touched, around 8-10 minutes. Place in an oiled bowl and allow to rise 1 ½-2 hours, or until doubled in size.

To assemble: On a lightly floured work surface, roll dough to 1/4-inch thickness. Using a 2 1/2-inch-round cutter or glass, cut rounds. You may have to roll out dough a few times. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise another 20-25 minutes.

Heat oil in a pot on medium heat until a thermometer measures 370 degrees. If you don’t have a thermometer, raise the heat to low-medium heat and test one of the doughnuts. If the oil immediately starts bubbling and the doughnut begins browning, it is the right temperature. If it doesn’t bubble at all, heat needs to be higher. If the oil splatters or the doughnut starts browning too quickly, heat needs to be turned down.

In a pyrex dish or large plate, combine around 2 cups of sugar with orange zest and combine lightly with a fork.

Using a slotted spoon, place 3-4 doughnuts into the oil. Allow to fry on each side around 40 seconds or until golden brown. Remove from oil and place onto a plate lined with paper towel. Once excess oil has been removed, roll in sugar-zest mixture while doughnuts are still warm so that the sugar sticks.

When all the doughnuts have been fried and sugared, begin to fill the doughnuts. Place the cranberry relish in a microwave-safe bowl and heat for 20-30 seconds, just to soften slightly.

Fill pastry bag with a few heaping tablespoons of cranberry relish. If you don’t have a tip, you can just snip the corner of the pastry bag with a scissor.

Using a wooden skewer or toothpick, make a hole in the side of each doughnut. Fit the pastry tip into a hole, pipe about 2 teaspoons jam into doughnut. Repeat with remaining doughnuts.

Posted on October 22, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Beyond the Stuffing

Looking for some truly unique ideas to serve for Thanksgiving? I’ve had my eyes peeled for weeks looking for treats to wow.

First up, I came across this imaginative Turkey shaped challah from Sweet Happy Life! Talk about an impressive piece to keep your guests talking, and a great project to work on with little kids.

Another innovative idea comes from the Queen of Butter herself, Paula Deen with these Sweet Potato Balls. Instead of the classic Thanksgiving dish of sweet potatoes topped with marshmallows, Paula’s recipe is an inside out version with gooey marshmallow in the middle.

And to finish off the meal, how about some homemade Pumpkin Ice Cream as an alternative to Pumpkin Pie! If you don’t have an ice cream maker, or just don’t feel like making ice cream (really, can’t blame you) just run to the store and pick some up such as Edy’s Pumpkin Ice Cream.

Have you found or made any inspiring, wow-factor dishes for Thanksgiving? We would love to hear about them!

Posted on November 10, 2011

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

So What Do Jews Eat on Thanksgiving?

Prep:
10 minutes

Cook:
45 minutes-1 hour

Yield:
8 servings


When I was in high school, I was dating a lovely (non-Jewish) guy whose parents seemed vaguely confused by my Jewish heritage and always had a slew of questions about Jews. In fact, one time the boyfriend’s sister asked me, “So, what do Jews eat on Thanksgiving?” I was a bit bewildered by her question. I responded, “Um, turkey…”

Thanksgiving is one of my favorite holidays for so many reasons: I love the Autumn-infused food choices, foliage inspired tablescapes, and of course, is there anything better than stuffing?

But is it appropriate to deviate from American classics and infuse some Jewrific food choices into the menu? I imagine many of you already do just this.

During a brief stint working for a law firm in Washington, DC I worked alongside a lovely woman whose family was Filipino. Thanksgiving was right around the corner during the time that we worked 15 hour days together, and so I got to learn a lot about her and her family. One of the most interesting tidbits she shared was that her family never celebrated Thanksgiving with turkey, but rather, with a roast pig, as was a traditional Filipino custom. So interesting! I also know plenty of Italian American families who serve lasagna and meatballs right alongside their turkey and stuffing each year. And in truth, what better way to celebrate this holiday of giving thanks and celebrating an immigrants’ experience than bringing in different cultural culinary traditions into the meal.

My own favorite Thanksgiving recipes include this fantastic, moist and already pareve (non-dairy) recipe for Sweet Potato Cake (you can ignore the icing or not). I also love Tyler Florence’s recipe for Whipped Sweet Potatoes with Bananas and Honey, perhaps as an alternative to the “traditional” sweet potatoes with marshmallows on top. You can also try trading in your white bread for leftover challah in your stuffing.

And for a truly Jewey Thanksgiving side dish, I recommend the tried and true Butternut Squash Kugel. This recipe was given to my mother-in-law, by her mother-in-law. I only hope one day I can push recipes upon my daughter-in-laws in the same way (I jest, I jest).

From The Melting Pot, a cookbook put out in the early 1980s by the Hebrew Academy of Long Beach Women’s League.

Butternut Squash Kugel

Ingredients

  • 2 10 ounce bags of frozen butternut squash (defrosted)
  • 1 stick of melted margarine
  • 1 cup of sugar
  • 1 cup of flour
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 cup of pareve milk
  • cinnamon

Directions

Mix all ingredients together in Kitchen Aid, or with electric mixer until blended and smooth.

Grease 9x9 pan (or 9x13 for thinner kugel). Sprinkle top with cinnamon

Cook at 350 until firm (approximately 45 minutes to 1 hour).

 

Posted on November 7, 2011

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

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