Tag Archives: Jewish New Year

Pomegranate Truffles

Yield:
20 truffles


Pomegranate truffles are a popular dessert in my Rosh Hashanah table. Persians are addicted to pomegranates; they even use pomegranates in stew! Hence, it seemed logical to use them for dessert as well. I love how tangy and sweet these truffles are, not to mention how well they go with a cup of tea (instead of using sugar).

pom truffles

I am proud that pomegranates are native of Persia – they are packed with nutritional value and antioxidants that protect against cellular damage. Mulberries, my husband’s favorite dried fruit, are a great source of iron and vitamin C. They also have an antioxidant present in red wine that has the potential of promoting a healthy heart. Hence, these truffles are not only absolutely fabulous to taste but packed with superfood qualities!

Pomegranate Truffles

Posted on September 2, 2013

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Our Complete Rosh Hashanah Menu

If you’re anything like me and my family, you’re probably in denial about the fact that Rosh Hashanah is mere days away.

But don’t fear. You can enjoy these last days on the beach, long Sunday mornings with the paper, and weekend brunches, because we’ve done the thinking for you. Check out our complete Rosh Hashanah menu including vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options for each course of the meal. Click through the slideshow, see our recipes below, and start making your shopping lists.

Still concerned? Leave us your last-minute Rosh Hashanah questions in the comments or on our Facebook page! I’ll answer a selection of them on Tuesday, just in time to head off the last-minute panic.

First Course

Traditional Chicken Soup

Sweet n Spicy Sweet Potato Soup

Vegetarian “Chicken” Soup

Beet Chips with Spicy Honey Mayo

Balsamic Apple Date Challah

Chopped Liver

Entrees

Grilled Chicken with Apple Salsa

Moroccan Lamb Shanks with Pomegranate Sauce

Traditional Sweet Brisket

Pomegranate Brisket with Cranberry Succotash

Pomegranate Chicken

Roasted Beet and Leek Risotto

Side Dishes

White Wine Braised Leeks

Green Beans with Tahini

Black Eyed Peas with Tumeric and Pomegranate

Apple Pear Cranberry Kugel

Gluten Free Apple Kugel

Tzimmes with Kneidlach

Desserts

Tayglach

Apple Sauce Souffle Bread Pudding

Honey Pomegranate Cake

Gluten-Free Apple Cake

Vegan Honey Cake

Pomegranate Date Bars

View all

Posted on September 1, 2013

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Rosh Hashanah Date Pomegranate Blondies

I like an apple cake as much as the next girl (two favorites are Amy’s Bissel Apple Cake and this Cornmeal Apple Upside Down Cake) but there are two nights of Rosh Hashanah, and once I’ve got my apple cake craving taken care of, I need something else. Enter these blondies. Though blondies might not seem quite fancy enough for a big holiday meal, trust me that these will blow your hair back, and can be gussied up into something truly stunning to look at, and downright delectable to eat.blondies-stacked

The only specialty item called for here is pomegranate molasses, which you can almost certainly find at your local Middle Eastern food store, or you can buy it online here. I love to drizzle some pomegranate molasses over my yogurt and granola in the morning, and it’s also good as an ice cream topping.blondies

 

Date Pomegranate Blondies

Posted on August 29, 2013

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Black-Eyed Peas with Tumeric and Pomegranate

Yield:
4 servings


Rosh Hashanah is an auspicious time, meant for new beginnings and good luck. We wish people inscriptions in the book of life, say special prayers for health and prosperity, and even wear white, symbolizing purity and cleansing from sin.

I like to put my money where my mouth is: according to Sephardic custom, certain foods – like dates, squash, and pomegranates – are lucky, and should be eaten in abundance on the New Year.

Another one of these auspicious foods is black-eyed peas, which I’ve been eating regularly ever since returning from Southeast Asia this past December. While they aren’t a traditionally Thai or Vietnamese food, they’re a staple in Burma, just over the border from Thailand. With the steady influx of Burmese émigrés to Thailand, vendors have started selling specialties from their hometown on the streets of Chiang Rai, near the border. One of my favorite dishes, which I first encountered in Naomi Duguid’s excellent book Burma, combines black-eyed peas with turmeric, shallots, ginger, and fish sauce. It’s a surprisingly addictive combination.

black-eyed pea salad 1_rf

I built on that original recipe in honor of Rosh Hashanah, adding another auspicious food – pomegranate seeds – and some pomegranate syrup, for good measure. I swapped out fish sauce for soy sauce, added a heaping handful of parsley, and finished the dish with a big squeeze of fresh lime.

Because Rosh Hashanah starts so early this year, we’re planning on at least one picnic lunch, to take advantage of what we hope will be good weather. I’m planning to serve this, alongside the usual round challah and apple slices dipped in honey. Double good luck!

black-eyed pea salad 3_rf

Black-Eyed Peas with Tumeric and Pomegranate

Posted on August 26, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Balsamic Apple Date Challah for Rosh Hashanah

Yield:
2 medium loaves


I love a good challah challenge and always welcome an excuse to create new flavors for friends and family to try. I tend to favor savory combinations such as rosemary and garlic, za’atar and “everything bagel” challah flavors, although I also make salty chocolate and cinnamon raisin versions on occasion.

For Rosh Hashanah this year I wanted to branch out and try something completely new and perfect for the holiday.

A few months ago I was chatting with my husband’s best friend’s mother, whom we lovingly call “Mama Morley.” She was explaining a technique she uses for round challah that I had not tried before – stuffing the challah dough and rolling it like a cinnamon bun. Brilliant!

This conversation stuck in my head, and so as I was mulling over potential recipes for the New Year I realized I should try this technique and stuff it with something uniquely delicious for Rosh Hashanah.

And thus my Balsamic Apple Date Challah was born. The dough itself is sweet, laced with cinnamon, vanilla and just a touch of nutmeg. And when you break into the round loaf, it is like biting into a challah cinnamon bun.

SONY DSC

I sprinkled the top of the challah with thick sea salt, cinnamon and sanding sugar. But you can leave the salt off if you would rather go all-sweet. Either way, your guests will barely be able to control themselves around this challah. My daughter kept trying to sneak her own bites, as you can see below from her chubby little hands which somehow made it into the photos.

Wishing everyone a sweet, happy, healthy and DELICIOUS New Year.

SONY DSC

Balsamic Apple Date Stuffed Challah

Posted on August 23, 2013

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Honey Pomegranate Cake


I have a love-hate relationship with the High Holidays (who doesn’t!?). It always seems to coincide with a busy time of work and I never have enough time to cook all the recipes I want to try. This year is the first time my husband and I will be celebrating the holidays at home (as opposed to going to family or friends). We are hosting lots of meals, which means I am forced to/have the opportunity to explore new recipes and adapt some of my favorites.

pomegranate glaze

The one thing I make year after year without fail is my mom’s honey cake. It is moist, sweet and the perfect addition to any Rosh Hashanah meal. It is the first thing I eat after the Yom Kippur fast with a big glass of orange juice.  When I think of the holiday season I can smell the honey cake and see my mom’s kitchen counter covered with honey cakes and challah.

This year, I wanted to change up the cake by utilizing the same concept and making it a little more interesting. Here is the recipe for a Honey Pomegranate Cake with a pomegranate glaze on top. You can make the cake ahead of time and freeze it for later, however you should not glaze it until you the day you are serving. honey pomegranate cake 1

Honey Pomegranate Cake

Posted on August 21, 2013

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The Best Apples & Honey Cakes for the New Year

You might still be thinking about summer tomatoes, peach pie, and drinks by the pool, but we are thinking about honey cake and apple desserts since Rosh Hashanah will be upon us in just two weeks!

Apple and honey cakes are traditional, sweet New Year desserts but they can definitely get a bit stale. The honey cake from my childhood? My Great Aunt Ruth would make honey cake sometime around June, cut it into slices, freeze it, and then defrost it in the fall to serve at my grandma’s house for Rosh Hashanah. Is it any wonder honey cake is far from my favorite dessert!?

So I set out to find the freshest, traditional and non-traditional, super scrumptious apples & honey desserts perfect for your Jewish New Year celebrations. Please note: Great Aunt Ruth’s version is not included.

Got a great recipe? Post below and let us know!

apples-galore

 

 

 

Apple Sauce Souffle Bread Pudding

Apple Sauce Cake with Caramel Glaze by The Sassy Radish

Amy’s Bissel Apple Cake

Traditional Apple Cake by Leah Koenig

Mini Apple and Honey Tarts by The Overtime Cook

The Best Apple Cake with Honey, by Rachel Korycan

Apple Crown Cake by Leah Cooks Kosher

Rose Petal Apple Tart

Marie Helen’s Apple Cake by Two Peas and their Pod

Honey Pomegranate Mandelbrot

Mayim Bialik’s Vegan Honey Cake

Majestic and Moist Honey Cake by Smitten Kitchen

Orange Honey Cake by Levana Kirschenbaum

Traditional Honey Cake

Impossible-to-Resist Honey Cake by Kosher Like Me

 

Posted on August 20, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Beet Chips with Spicy Honey Mayo

Prep:
20 minutes

Cook:
25 minutes


I’m kind of obsessed with beets. I’ve made Beet Fries, Pickled Beets and even Beet Hummus. Not only are they tasty and healthy, but a shade of vibrant pink (or golden yellow) that pops on your holiday table. Beets are rich in vitamin C, fiber, and some even consider them to be a natural aphrodisiac. Can’t hurt! Pass by the canned variety in favor of the more flavorful fresh. Totally versatile, beets are perfect roasted, pickled, raw or in this case, fried.

beet-chips-2-stampSprinkled with a little salt, these crunchy chips are delicious on their own, and even better when paired with a sweet and spicy pareve mayonnaise. Sort of a modern twist on apples dipped in honey. I used just red beets, but throw in some golden ones as well for a colorful addition to your Rosh Hashanah meal. The prayer said over beets in Hebrew means to remove, which signifies the hope that enemies and faults will be removed in the New Year.

beet-chipsstamp

Amy Kritzer is a food writer and recipe developer in Austin, TX who enjoys cooking, theme parties and cowboys. She challenges herself to put a spin on her Bubbe’s traditional Jewish recipes and blogs about her endeavors at What Jew Wanna Eat. Her recipes have been featured on Bon Appetit, Daily Candy, The Today Show Blog and more. You can follow her on TwitterPinterest and Facebook and watch her cooking videos on Google+.

Beet Chips with Spicy Honey Mayo

Posted on August 19, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Jewish Foodie News Roundup!

Have you heard of the cronut, a donut-croissant hybrid that is all the rage currently in NYC? On any given morning I log in to Facebook and at least one of my friends has been standing on line (sometimes in the rain) since 6:00 am in order to procure one of Dominque Ansel’s much-coveted cronuts. Well, the cronut craze has officially landed in Israel! The Forward reported earlier this week that Lenchner bakery in Tel Aviv has made the first kosher version; and now other bakeries in Israel are coming up with their own versions. Will the cronut be the new cupcake? It doesn’t have my vote yet, but then again, I have yet to wait online at 6:00 am to actually taste one. Looks pretty tempting though, eh?

cronutcropped

On Chosen Eats this week Mari Levine presents us with the results of a kosher hot dog taste test “throwdown.” Many of the hot dog brands are ones I haven’t even heard of including International Beef Frankfurters and the winner, Shor Harbor Beef Franks. My own favorite from the list? Abeles & Heyman! What’s your preferred kosher hot dog brand – we want to know!

hotdogs2_large

Are you a fan of the Food TV show ‘Chopped’? If not then you might have missed Chef Katsuji Tanabe, the chef of kosher restaurant Mexikosher in Los Angeles, take the win last week! The Jewish Journal has a full write-up of the chef and his TV appearance, including his tips for winning – don’t drink the coffee!

In other kosher restaurant-related news, The Prime Grill Cookbook is coming out in mid-September. The new cookbook by Chefs David Kolotkin (a Nosher contributor!) and Joey Allaham, takes you inside Prime Grill and will include some of the restaurant’s signature dishes including Smoked BBQ Short Ribs, Texas Style Rib Eye, Chicken & Waffle Nuggets with Maple Syrup Dip, Quinoa Cake “Latkes,” among many more.

RH food collage

Last but certainly not least, did you hear about our Rosh Hashanah Ingredient Challenge?! Our own version of Top Chef, High Holiday Edition, we are asking our favorite contributors and YOU, our readers, to submit your best Rosh Hashanah recipe and photos. Your mission – use two of the following traditional New Year ingredients and send us the recipe by August 23rd: pomegranate, honey, apples, dates, gourds, beets, fenugreek and black eyed peas. More info here.

Posted on August 16, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Rosh Hashanah Ingredient Challenge!

It may seem that Rosh Hashanah is a lifetime away, but in fact, it is a mere three weeks away! And the month of Elul is already upon us, so I am hyper focused on preparing for the New Year, if you can believe it. Elul is actually one of my favorite times during the Jewish year. I love the spiritual gear-up for the High Holy Days; taking time to reflect on the year that has passed, and hopes and goals for the year ahead.

I also love trying new recipes, and preparing desserts, challah and other dishes for the New Year. It always goes back to food for me.

And in the spirit of trying new things for the New Year, here at The Nosher we decided to try something a bit different this holiday season – our first ever Rosh Hoshanah Ingredient Challenge!

We reached out to some of our favorite contributors and told them their mission, should they choose to accept it, is to create a delicious, beautiful Rosh Hashanah recipe using 2 of the following traditional New Year ingredients: pomegranate, honey, apples, dates, gourds, beets, fenugreek and black eyed peas. They will get extra points if the dish created is ROUND! Stay tuned over the next few weeks to see their amazing creations.

RH food collage

 

But we want to see what kind of Rosh Hashanah recipes YOU can come up with so we are extending the ingredient challenge to our readers too! Send us your best recipes using two of the above ingredients and email them to thenosher.contests@gmail.com.

We will feature the best recipe as part of our High Holiday menus, so get cooking! Entries need to be received by Friday, August 23rd and must include a description of the dish, ingredients, directions and at least one photo.

Wishing everyone a meaningful Elul full of reflection and maybe some recipe-creation too.

Posted on August 14, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy