Tag Archives: gluten free

Almond Butter & Jam Mousse Trifles

Prep:
24 hours

Yield:
6 mini trifles

During Passover each year, I really like to keep things simple. My husband and I make mostly the same dishes for our seder, stock the fridge with all our favorite produce and dairy products and try to keep things basic, fresh and delicious. But of course, I also rack my brain trying to come up with fun new ideas that are scrumptious but not too difficult to execute.

Last year I made Rachel Khoo’s cheese and potato nests with brie (no bacon) and this year I am going to make some zucchini noodles with a hearty Bolognese sauce (made with my new spiralizer – have you ordered one yet!?)

pbj-stamp-with-title1

And I also dreamed up a light but delectable new dessert recipe. Of course it isn’t really peanut butter & jelly, since I know most American Ashkenazi Jews don’t eat kitnyot. But it has the same richness as peanut butter and tastes like a bread-less PB&J sandwich. Adults and kids will love it, and it’s a nice break from all the flourless chocolate cake and macaroons.

pbj-stamp2

If you don’t have mini cups, you can use individual plastic cups to make the trifles or also use a large trifle dish for family-style serving. After all, Passover is definitely a holiday all about family. So grab a spoon and dig in!

 

Almond Butter & Jam Mousse Trifles

Ingredients

For the pie crust:

1 cup sliced almonds

4 Tbsp melted butter or margarine

2 Tbsp brown sugar

2 Tbsp almond meal

¼ tsp sea salt

For the almond butter mousse:

2 14 ounce cans full-fat coconut milk, or 1 can coconut cream

¾ cup almond butter

¼ cup sugar

4 egg whites

2 cups raspberry or strawberry jam

Whipped cream (optional)

Fresh berries (optional)

Directions

Make sure to chill the coconut milk overnight.

To make the crust:

In a sauté pan over medium heat, toast almonds until fragrant, around 3-4 minutes. Be careful not to toast too long or almonds will burn and taste slightly bitter.

In a food processor fitted with blade attachment, pulse toasted almonds, butter or margarine, brown sugar, almond meal and salt. Pulse until mixture resembles coarse sand. Set aside.

To make the mousse:

Using an electric mixer, whisk egg whites until soft peaks form. Add the ¼ cup sugar, whisking until stiff peaks form. Set aside.

Remove lid of coconut milk without shaking or tipping the can. Scoop out the solid cream and place into a chilled bowl. Leave the liquid in the bottom of the can and reserve it for soups, smoothies or other recipes. If cream has not come to top, put coconut milk through fine mesh sieve and discard liquid.

Using a hand mixer, beat until creamed together, around 1 minute.

Add almond butter one tablespoon at a time and mix until smooth.

Gently fold egg whites into almond butter mixture a few tablespoons at a time until incorporated. There shouldn’t be any streaks.

Layer individual cups or trifle dish with pie crust crumbles, then mousse, then jam and repeat.

Garnish with whipped cream and berries if desired.

Posted on April 10, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Passover-Friendly Strawberry Almond Mini Muffins

Passover and I haven’t always been friends. There was a time when I thought about Passover approaching and my mind would be overrun by what I can’t eat. As a girl who has always loved carbs (I love you, pasta), the thought of saying “good-bye” to my beloved noodles and bread, even for eight days, caused me to have a little anxiety attack.

strawberry-2-stampBut as the food world has become increasingly creative to help accommodate the never-ending list of folks with food allergies, Passover has become less about what I can’t have and more about what I can have by flexing my creative foodie muscles.

strawberry-5-stampThe recipe below is a great example of this. I’ve made a version of these before for one of my clients who prefers gluten-free food options. I wanted to give my old recipe a new Spring season twist so I added the roasted strawberries, which are coming out in droves here in Miami. The result is a not-too-sweet but supremely delicious (and healthy) breakfast/snack treat. I hope you enjoy!

strawberry-4-title-stamp

Ingredients

3 cups roasted strawberries

2 Tbsp coconut oil

½ cup vanilla yogurt

¼  cup honey

2 eggs

1 Tbsp vanilla extract

2 ½  cups blanched almond flour

¼  tsp sea salt

½  tsp baking soda

Directions

To make the roasted strawberries:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Toss 3 cups of quartered strawberries with a pinch of salt and 2 teaspoon melted coconut oil or other cooking oil that your prefer.

Spread strawberries in a single layer on a parchment lined baking sheet. Roast for 25-30 minutes or until juicy and reduced in size. Set aside to cool.

To make the muffins:

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

Combine all the wet ingredients into a bowl and mix well with a spoon.

Add the dry muffin ingredients and mix well. Fold in the strawberries

Place cupcake liners in a baking pan, and fill the liners halfway with batter. Note: feel free to not use cupcakes liners but make certain that you are using a NON-STICK mini muffin pan.  Coat the muffin tins with a healthy dose of butter or cooking spray and sprinkle each with almond flour to ensure the muffins don't stick.

Bake for about 18 minutes, or until a toothpick placed in the center of a muffin comes out clean and the tops are starting to brown.

Allow to cool for at least 15 minutes before serving.

Posted on April 8, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Passover Stuffed Cabbage Rolls

Yield:
approximately 15 stuffed cabbage

There’s nothing like Passover to remind us where we come from. In many Jewish homes, Passover traditions are carried down from father to son, establishing the family’s customs and setting the standards for their Passover pantry.

stuffed-cabbage5

Growing up, my family’s standards were quite stringent. We did not eat any processed ingredients, and we only used produce that could be peeled. My mother prepared simple syrup in place of sugar, and we seasoned our dishes minimally with kosher salt, no spices allowed. Thankfully, I married into a family whose customs were slightly more lenient. My in-laws allow a variety of fruits and vegetables, including cabbage, as well as some minimally processed foods, like tomato sauce.

stuffed-cabbage4

When I spent Passover with my in-laws last year, I decided to pay homage to my roots by adapting my grandmother’s stuffed cabbage recipe for the holiday. While my grandmother would never have made this recipe for Passover, to me, it signifies the union of my husband’s familial customs with my Eastern European heritage. And that is precisely how we celebrate Passover.

stuffed-cabbage7

Passover Stuffed Cabbage

Ingredients

1 head of green cabbage

1 lb ground beef

1 heaping cup leftover mashed potatoes

1 small onion, grated

1 egg

salt and pepper, to taste

 

For the sauce:

2 15 oz cans tomato sauce

1 Granny Smith apple, peeled and grated

1 large tomato, finely chopped

1/3 cup sugar

Juice of 1 lemon

salt and pepper, to taste

Directions

Place the cabbage in the freezer overnight (about 12 hours). Remove and place in a colander in the sink to defrost. This makes the cabbage pliable for rolling and stuffing.

Remove the outer leaves of the cabbage and discard. Peel the remaining large leaves, taking care not to tear the cabbage as you go. Set the whole leaves aside and chop up the remaining cabbage for later.

In a bowl, combine the ground beef, potatoes, onion, egg, salt and pepper. Set aside.

Set up a stuffing station with your whole cabbage leaves and ground beef mixture. With a paring knife, trim the thick part of the stem off the base of the leaves, taking care not to cut through the rest of the leaf. Place the leaves upright so that they are curling upward like a bowl.

Place a small handful of filling towards the base of each leaf and fold over the leaf from the left side. Roll the cabbage leaf up and using your finger, stuff the loose end of the leaf inward, pushing it into the center. Rolling the cabbage this way ensures that they hold together nicely during cooking.

Continue with remaining leaves. If you have any leftover filling, simply roll them into meatballs to place in the pot alongside the cabbage rolls.

Place the stuffed cabbage rolls in a large pot and cover with sauce ingredients. If you had any leftover cabbage or meatballs, add them to the pot as well.

Bring the sauce to a gentle boil over medium heat and reduce to a simmer. Cover the pot, leaving it slightly open so that the steam does not force the cabbage rolls to open. Cook for approximately 2 - 2 1/2 hours, until cabbage is tender and sauce has thickened.

VARIATION: for unstuffed cabbage soup, shred the cabbage and roll the meat into balls. Place everything into a pot and continue as above.

Posted on April 7, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Gluten-Free Hamantaschen

Growing up, I didn’t see a lot of my grandmother. She was old and feeble, and chronic pain often prevented her from leaving the house. Still, there were a few occasions when my grandmother would never fail to make an appearance in my mother’s kitchen. One such of those special occasions was right before the holiday of Purim began. She carefully tied the strings of her apron in a neat bow before she perched herself on a kitchen stool and began to give orders.

GF-hamantaschen-stamp

She showed me how to dip the rim of a wine glass in the pearly mounds of flour to make the perfect circle for my cookies. She directed my fingers with a watchful eye as I carefully portioned out just the right amount of filling and carefully folded my circle into a triangle, or “Haman’s Ears” as my grandmother used to call them. We sat there late into the night, after the cookies had long since come out of the oven, covered in flour and giggling like schoolgirls.

Nowadays, we live in different cities and my grandmother’s days in the kitchen are far behind her. As I am no longer able to eat the cookies as she made them, I have adapted the recipe. But every time I make them, there is still a small part of her inside them. I hope you enjoy these hamentashen as much as I do.

Vanilla Bean Hamantaschen with Apricot Filling

Ingredients

For the dough:

2 cups almond flour

1 cup arrowroot flour (plus ¼ cup for dusting)

½ tsp sea salt

1 vanilla bean

½ cup of honey

¼ cup of coconut oil, melted

For the filling:

11 ounces dried apricots, roughly chopped

1 Tbsp lemon juice

4 Tbsp honey

½ cup of water

Directions

In a small saucepan, combine the apricots, lemon juice, honey and water over medium high heat.

Bring to a boil and stir continuously, until the mixture has reduced. Then, remove from heat and set aside while you make the dough.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

In a mixing bowl, combine the almond flour, arrowroot flour, and the sea salt until well mixed.

With a small paring knife, poke a tiny hole in the top of your vanilla bean and slice it in half.  Use the knife to scrap the small black seeds into a small bowl. For this recipe, you should only be using the seeds from 2-inches of your bean (the equivalent of 1 teaspoon of vanilla extract.)

Add the vanilla bean seeds, the honey, and the melted coconut oil to your flour mixture and stir until just incorporated, being careful not to over-mix the dough. Using your hands, form the dough into a ball.

Next, position the dough on a sheet of parchment paper, adding arrowroot flour as necessary to keep it from sticking. Place another sheet of parchment paper over the dough, and using a rolling pin, roll into a 1/4 inch thick layer.

Remove the top layer of parchment paper. Dust the open end of a glass (or a round cookie cutter) with arrowroot powder. Then, carefully cut out circles in the dough, and remove the extra dough from the sides.

Fill the center of each circle with a little over a teaspoon of filling. Carefully fold each one of the three sides in, forming a triangular shape, and sealing the filling inside. Pinch the corners in to seal the cookies.

Transfer the parchment to a baking sheet, and bake cookies for 20 minutes. Remove from oven and place on a cooling rack.

Posted on February 21, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Blogger Spotlight: The Kosher Cave Girl

Gluten-free and paleo diets seem to be all the rage currently. When I first saw The Kosher Cave Girl on instagram, I was intrigued – it’s a very catchy name. And I wanted to learn more.

While I remain a strong gluten and bread enthusiast, I love to hear about other passionate bloggers’ food journeys, and Donyel Meese (aka The Kosher Cave Girl) has a very interesting food journey. She and I had the chance to catch up over email recently and I really loved what she had to say about making your own bread and sweets and switching out healthy options into your diet – everything in moderation! Read more about Donyel and her kosher Paleo lifestyle below.

And make sure to check back tomorrow for her version of gluten-free hamantaschen just in time for Purim next month!

donyel collageWhy did you start blogging?

The idea to start a blog stemmed from an afternoon I spent with a friend whining about the fact that I had just made the most incredible hazelnut-swirled brownies, but that I couldn’t find the piece of paper that I had written the recipe on anywhere. The friend suggested that I start blogging my recipes to ensure that I’d never lose another one. I really do enjoy the creating recipes, the photography, and coming up with posts. The Kosher Cave Girl also serves as an outlet for my love of writing, and my readers are often unfortunately witnesses to my (often rather pathetic) attempts at humor.

Your food journey has had lots of ups and downs. Would you say you always loved cooking and food, or did it result out of necessity for your diet?

I have always loved baking things. When my friends arrive at my apartment, they make a beeline for my freezer, breezing past me without so much as a hello until they’ve got something in their mouth. When I found out that I was both lactose and dairy intolerant, and made the switch to a Paleo lifestyle, I quickly grew frustrated with what I saw as so many restrictions.

It was as simple as changing my outlook. Instead of mourning the fact that I could no longer eat my favorite browned-butter snickerdoodles, I decided to create a version that I could eat. Now, there are very few foods that I actually miss, and I have a lot of fun coming up with recipes to mirror the dishes that I loved before going Paleo.

paleo recipe2What are your culinary influences?

My mother spent time in Africa, Australia, and Thailand before returning to the U.S. after she completed her undergrad at University of Hawai’i, so I was exposed to lot of cultural dishes at a very young age. Because of her, I love experimenting with unique flavors and spices like coconut milk, lemongrass, saffron, and curry.

For those that can and do eat gluten, what ways can the paleo diet influence their eating habits, without taking away their beloved bread?

You don’t have to follow a Paleo diet to incorporate fresh, healthy, & non-processed foods in your lifestyle. Simple switches can make a world of difference. Try making tuna salad with avocado instead of mayo. Learn to love water. If you want bread, cookies, or cakes, make your own instead of buying prepackaged ones loaded with preservatives to keep them “fresh” (homemade is not only cheaper, but it tastes better too!). Sodas and sugary drinks are usually calorie bombs and do little to quench your thirst. Cook with coconut oil and olive oil, instead of canola oil and vegetable oil.

One of the wonderful aspects of a Paleo lifestyle is that you’re encouraged not to count calories. Instead, emphasis is placed on mindful and intuitive eating – listen to your body and eat when you’re hungry and stop when you’re satiated.

paleo recipe1What has surprised you about blogging or what’s been the best thing that has happened as a result of blogging?

I always thought that blogging was so glamorous, but I’ve found that in this circus, I feel more like the juggler than the girl on the flying trapeze. The amount of time and preparation that goes into blogging is absolutely unbelievable. The readers only see the glamorous side of food blogging, but behind the scenes, all hell breaks lost. My kitchen sink is perpetually overflowing with dirty dishes. I spend more time at the grocery store than at my own apartment. Recipes go horribly wrong, it takes 200 pictures of cookies to get one useable one, and my e-mail inbox is almost always full. On top of all of that, I’m juggling my food blogger lifestyle with being a full-time student.

I’ve learned so much about photography, graphic design, and social media, but my absolute favorite perk is being able to connect with readers, whether it’s getting to know them, answering a question, or helping them adapt a recipe. It’s so rewarding, and it brings me such a sense of joy and fulfillment.

What advice do you have for someone else who wants to start a food blog?

Is it terribly cliché of me to tell you that good things come to those who wait? When I first started blogging in Fall of 2013, I had no readers. You could literally hear the crickets chirping every time I posted a new recipe. But don’t get discouraged. Keep posting, keep marketing, and people will come.

I’ve also found that pictures are key. I’m also guilty when I tell you that if I see a recipe without a picture, I probably won’t make it. Everyone loves drooling over stunning food photography, myself included. I don’t have any fancy lights or props, just my Nikon 5100. I’m still learning, but I’m having fun with it.

What’s on the horizon for your blog?

Thank G-d, I’ve been offered a lot of wonderful opportunities for The Kosher Cave Girl. Let’s just say that there might be a cookbook revolving around a Paleo take on traditional Shabbat foods in my future. I have a lot of exciting projects and partnerships in the works, and I can’t wait to see what the future holds.

Love Jewish food? Sign up for our weekly recipe newsletter!

Posted on February 20, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Game Day Snacks Roundup

The Super Bowl is a week away, so the men in my life tell me. I am not much for subscribing to traditional gender roles, but I admit freely: I hate football. But I do love cooking up snacks for football-viewing especially spicy chicken wings and beef-stuffed knishes.

Looking for some kosher snack ideas for the football fans in your life? We have some great dairy, meat, pareve and gluten free ideas from our recipe archives and our favorite bloggers.

What will you be cooking up? Share below!

game day snacks

Roasted Garlic Hummus (pareve) 

Beet Chips with Spicy Honey Mayo (pareve)

beet-chips-1

Mediterranean Seven Layer Dip from The Shiksa (dairy)

Pesto Potato Pinwheels from The Overtime Cook (pareve)

Beef and Potato Puff Pastry Knishes (meat)

Spinach and Cheese Borekas (dairy) 

Pastrami on Rye Potstickers from What Jew Wanna Eat (meat)

Classic Hot Wings (meat)

Sweet and Spicy Asian Wings (meat)

Fried Pickles from The Food Yenta (dairy)

buckeye bites

Buckeye Bites from The Kosher Cave Girl (pareve)

Speculoos Chex Party Mix from Busy in Brooklyn (dairy)

Love Jewish food? Sign up for our weekly recipe newsletter!

Posted on January 25, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Cauliflower Tomato Bake with Basil and Parmesan

Hello Nosher readers! I’m so honored to have a recipe on this lovely site. I’ve been a long-time reader of MyJewishLearning.com so am extra honored to be featured.

Now, about this recipe. Lately, I’ve been on a mad “one-pot” meal frenzy.

tomatoes 2

I’ve got several full time jobs, including one with health insurance benefits and one with hugs-and-kisses benefits, both of which take up a lot of time. When it comes to cooking for Shabbat (or any meal), I try to keep it simple. This little side dish would be perfect with some grilled lemon salmon or any baked fish, really. And, if bread crumbs are omitted or almond flour is substituted, it’s grain-free and gluten-free friendly, which also means Passover-friendly. I hope you enjoy!

tomatoes 5

 

 

Cauliflower Tomato Bake with Basil and Parmesan

Ingredients

1 pound cherry tomatoes, halved

1 head of cauliflower, chopped

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil

1/3 cup panko bread crumbs (or almond flour if gluten-free)

2 Tbsp melted butter

2 Tbsp chopped fresh basil

1/2 cup shredded Parmesan cheese

kosher salt

pepper

Directions

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Combine the tomatoes, cauliflower, garlic and olive oil in an 9x13-inch baking dish. Season with salt and pepper. Bake, stirring occasionally, until the cauliflower are browning, about 25 - 30 minutes.  After 25 - 30 minutes, you might notice that the casserole has become a bit watery.

Note: you might want to spoon out some of that moisture to help the cauliflower keep its crispness.

Combine the panko breadcumbs and the butter, then sprinkle over the tomatoes. Next, sprinkle the Parmesan over the casserole. Broil for 30 - 45 seconds, then sprinkle the basil over the top. Serve.

Love Jewish food? Sign up for our weekly recipe newsletter!

Posted on January 21, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Gluten-Free Honey Apple Cake


For me, Rosh Hashanah always symbolizes the beginning of Fall (although it is way early this year, practically still summer) and I love celebrating apples at my holiday table.

This sweet, nutty apple cake will be the perfect ending to your Rosh Hashanah or Sukkot meal, and is sure to satisfy even the most gluten-loving guests.

honey apple cake 2

Gluten-Free Honey Apple Cake

Ingredients

¼ cup coconut oil (or margarine or other fat of your choice)

¼ cup honey

¼ cup brown sugar

2 eggs

¼ cup applesauce

1 tsp vanilla

½ cup almond meal

½ cup brown rice flour

½ cup millet flour

3 Tbsp teff flour (or millet or brown rice flour)

1 tsp xanthan gum

1 tsp baking powder

½ tsp baking soda

½ tsp salt

½ tsp cinnamon

1/8 tsp nutmeg

1 cup diced apple

1 tsp sucanat (raw sugar)

Directions

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees (if you have convection, use it!) and grease an 8-inch round pan.

Using a mixer, cream coconut oil, honey, and brown sugar. Add eggs one at a time, allowing to incorporate before adding the next. Stir in applesauce and vanilla.

In a separate bowl, whisk together dry ingredients: almond meal, brown rice flour, millet flour, teff flour, xanthan gum, baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, and nutmeg. Add dry ingredients to the wet ingredients in three batches, allowing each batch to incorporate before adding the next. The batter will become thick and sticky. Stir in diced apples.

Spread batter into prepared pan and sprinkle sucanat over the top. Bake for 45-50 minutes until the top is firm, the edges are golden and crispy and a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean.

For more of Rella's delicious gluten-free recipes check out her blog The Penny Pinching Epicure.

Posted on August 27, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Gluten Free Mini Yogurt Muffins

I like to say that baking is chemistry, and gluten-free baking is a science.

The secret to baking gluten-free goodies that are very close to the real thing lies in producing the “stretch factor” without gluten and using the right mix of gluten-free flours.

Creating the Illusion of Gluten

Gluten is the protein found in wheat, barley, rye and spelt that creates the “stretch factor” in batters and dough. Adding xanthan gum, guar gum, or psyllium husk to the mix helps create the same stretchy properties, and results in a chewy rather than crumbly baked good.

The Right Mix

In general, a mix of gluten-free flours will always be better than a single gluten-free flour. This is because no gluten-free flour can closely mirror glutinous all-purpose flour.

The gluten-free flours I use most frequently are sorghum, millet, brown rice, and tapioca. To add richness, I also sometimes add almond or hazelnut meal into the mix. A lot of my recipes have been developed through trial-and-error, but there are also many resources online for gluten-free baking.

I buy my own flours separately and combine them in different ratios depending on the recipe, but there are also some great gluten-free flour mixes out there: My favorite brand for all of my gluten-free flours is Bob’s Red Mill and Namaste is a close second. You can find gluten-free flours at most mainstream grocery stores these days, although it is usually cheaper to order them online.

Gluten-free baking is a bit more complex than glutinous baking, but I promise the results are so much better than store-bought gluten-free baked goods.

Cranberry pistachio yogurt mini-muffins

These yogurt mini-muffins are the perfect grab-and-go breakfast or snack, packed with whole grains and protein. I offer two mix-in options below (coconut-chocolate chip and cranberry-pistachio), but feel free to add other nuts, dried fruit, or sweet morsels of your choosing. This is recipe is adapted from the Kitchn.

Gluten Free Mini Yogurt Muffins

Ingredients

Dry Ingredients:

1 cup sorghum

1/2 cup millet

1/2 cup tapioca

1 Tbsp baking powder

1 tsp baking soda

1 tsp xanthan gum

1/3 cup sugar

2 tsp cinnamon

1/2 tsp sea salt

 

Wet Ingredients:

2 eggs

3/4 cup plain yogurt

1/4 cup milk

1 tsp vanilla

 

For coconut-chocolate chip:

1/2 cup shredded unsweetened coconut

1/2 cup chocolate chips

 

For cranberry-pistachio:

1/2 cup dried cranberries

1/2 cup pistachios

Directions

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees and grease a mini-muffin tin (if you have convection, use it!).

In a mixing bowl, whisk together dry ingredients. In a separate bowl, whisk eggs, milk, yogurt, and vanilla until smooth.

Pour dry ingredients into wet ingredients and stir with a wooden spoon until combined. Stir in chosen mix-ins.

Divide batter evenly into muffin tin (I use my medium cookie scoop) and bake for 15-18 minutes until tops are golden brown and firm. Cool on a wire rack and store in an airtight container on the counter for 3-4 days or in the refrigerator for up to a week.

Posted on June 12, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Yummy Gluten-Free Hamantaschen

Yield:
7-8 dozen small hamantaschen

gluten free hamantaschen v2Food related traditions like hamantashen are some of my favorite parts of being Jewish. I had to work on this hamantashen recipe for a while, because creating a gluten-free cookie dough that can be rolled and cut is no easy task. But I think I’ve finally got it (don’t skip chilling the dough, it really makes all the difference)!

This recipe makes hamentashen that are crispy on the outside but soft and chewy on the inside. If you prefer them to be completely crispy, bake an additional 2-3 minutes.

Yummy Gluten-Free Hamantaschen

Ingredients

1 cup (2 sticks) of margarine, softened to room temperature
1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
2 eggs
1 tsp vanilla
1 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
3 1/4 cups gluten-free all purpose flour, divided*
jam or other filling of your choice

Directions

*Make sure you choose a gluten-free flour that includes xanthan gum (I like Bob's Wonderful Bread Mix or Namaste Foods Perfect Flour Blend), or add 1 1/2 tsp of xanthan gum with the flour.

Cream margarine and sugar on high for 2-3 minutes. Add eggs one at a time, allowing to combine before adding the next.

In a separate bowl, whisk together baking powder, baking soda, salt, and 3 cups of gluten-free flour (and xanthan gum if required). Turn mixer to the lowest speed and add to wet mixture a 1/2 cup at a time, allowing the dry ingredients to be incorporated before adding more. The dough should be soft but not sticky.

Divide the dough into four parts, roll each into a ball, wrap separately in plastic wrap, and refrigerate for an hour.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

Dust the counter and the rolling pin with gluten-free flour. Remove 1 dough ball from the refrigerator and cut into circles using a 4 oz. mason jar or small juice glass (if the dough is too sticky to roll out and cut, add additional flour a tablespoon at a time until it is pliable enough). Fill with 1/4 tsp tsp of filling, pinch into a triangle, and bake at 350 for 15 minutes. Cool on a wire rack.

Repeat with remaining dough balls.

Rella Kaplowitz has blogged gluten-free and mostly dairy-free as the Penny Pinching Epicure for the last 3 years. In "real life," Rella lives in Washington, DC with her husband where she specializes in organizational improvement consulting for the federal government.

Posted on February 19, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Privacy Policy