Tag Archives: cookies

Milk Chocolate Butterscotch Monster Cookies

Yield:
3 dozen cookies

Halloween is almost here, did you know? Hard not to notice with pumpkins, spiders and candy corn everywhere.

And Halloween actually falls on Shabbat later this week, which for some people, I know, will be problematic. Some Jews don’t think we should celebrate Halloween at all. And some Jews think American Jews can and should embrace the celebration.

Milk chocolate monster cookies

I fall into the camp of celebrating and I just love making fun treats, especially now that I have a daughter to share in the fun. And last week I made cookies that are equal parts fun for kids and delicious for adults. I brought a batch of these cookies to my share with family this past weekend, and by Sunday, they were totally gone; even all the skinny, dieting women in my family devoured them.

I love baking with dark chocolate usually, but these milk chocolate and butterscotch cookies are seriously delicious. The dark cocoa powder sets off the sweetness of the milk chocolate. I also like to add a pinch of thick sea salt before baking, which really elevates the flavor.

Want to add the candy eyes? They are made by Wilton and you can easily order them on Amazon. Another tip: I swear by using Hershey’s Special Dark Cocoa Powder.

milk chocolate monster cookies

This recipe is based on Martha Stewat’s Milk Chocolate Cookie Recipe, which can be found in her cookbook Martha Stewart’s Cookies: The Very Best Baking Treats to Bake and to Share

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Milk Chocolate Butterscotch Monster Cookies

Ingredients

1 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 cup cocoa powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
4 ounces good-quality milk chocolate chips (for melting)
3 ounces good-quality milk chocolate chips (for mixing)
3 ounces butterscotch chips
1/2 cup unsalted butter
1 1/2 cups sugar
2 eggs
1 tsp vanilla extract
candy eyes (optional)
thick sea salt (optional)

Directions

Preheat oven to 325 degrees.

Whisk together flour, cocoa powder, baking soda and salt in a bowl.

Melt the 4 ounces milk chocolate with the butter in a glass bowl in the microwave for 30 second increments. Stir vigorously after each time until the chocolate-butter mixture is shiny and completely smooth.

Beat the chocolate mixture, sugar, eggs and vanilla together using a wooden spoon or the paddle attachment of a stand mixer. Add dry ingredients.

Fold in milk chocolate and butterscotch chips.

Using a cookie scoop, drop dough onto silpat or parchment paper lined baking sheets. Add candy monster eyes and sea salt if desired.

Bake 13-14 minutes, until cookies are flat and the surface cracks. Allow to cool 2 minutes on baking sheets, then transfer to wire racks to cool completely.

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Posted on October 27, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Almond Butter Chocolate Chip Cookies

Yield:
2 dozen cookies

I love it when people taste my pareve desserts and say, “Wow—this is pareve!?”

It’s the same rule with Passover dishes and desserts. Which is why I am on a never-ending search for the perfect Passover desserts that are good enough to eat all year and just happen to also be Passover-friendly.almond-butter-chocolate-chip-stampIn one of my searches I came across this recipe for Flourless Peanut Butter Cookies which I realized could easily be made Passover-friendly just by swapping out the peanut butter for almond butter. I adjusted a few ingredients and the result is a super tasty, chewy cookie that is good enough to enjoy all year. Your guests are sure to ask incredulously, “Are you sure these are kosher for Passover?” Truly the ultimate compliment.

Almond Butter Chocolate Chip Cookies

Ingredients

1 cup almond butter

1 egg

1 cup packed brown sugar

1 tsp vanilla

1 cup chocolate chips

1/2 cup chopped walnuts

thick sea salt (optional)

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Mix together almond butter, egg, brown sugar and vanilla.

Fold in chocolate chips and walnuts.

Spoon out tablespoon-sized mounds onto ungreased cookie sheet. Sprinkle with pinch of thick sea salt on top if desired.

Bake for 11 minutes, and then allow to cool for 5 minutes while cookies remain on the baking sheet. Transfer to baking rack to cool completely.

Posted on April 2, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Heart-Shaped Linzer Cookies

Yield:
Around 2 dozen cookies

Linzer torte cookies were one of my mom’s go-to recipes that I have fond memories of making with her as a child. We didn’t make them for Valentine’s Day per se, but made them for any special occasion that came up – parties, piano recitals and even rainy Saturdays.

This recipe isn’t quite the same as hers, which unfortunately was lost when she passed away. But it is the closest thing I have found to the buttery cookies we made together during my childhood. I find this version to be particularly versatile because the cookies are excellent made in both dairy and pareve varieties, which cannot be said for every dessert recipe!

linzer-cookies1-stampI actually don’t make these for Valentine’s Day either, but really love to make these cookies for Sheva Berakhot celebrations for friends! But they are also great as a sweet treat for your loved ones on Valentine’s Day, Shabbat or any day you just want to show a little extra lovin’.

I love making these fun square-shaped cookies with just a smidge of sweet jam peeking out from the heart shaped cut-out. But you can have fun and make any shape that suits your fancy.

linzer-cookies2-stamp

Heart-Shaped Linzer Cookies

Ingredients

1 cup butter or margarine, softened

½ cup sugar

1 egg

½ tsp vanilla

1 tsp fresh orange zest

2 cups all-purpose flour

Extra flour for rolling

Raspberry jam

Powdered sugar

Special equipment: rolling pin and cookie cutters

Directions

Cream butter and sugar together until smooth. Add egg, vanilla and orange zest and combine.

Add flour one cup at a time until full incorporated.

Place dough in plastic wrap and chill for at least one hour or overnight.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Roll out dough on a lightly floured surface and cut into desired shapes. You may need to add extra flour during this step as this dough tends to be sticky, but try not to add too much.

Place on baking sheet and bake for 10 minutes.

When cookies have cooled completely, spread with jam and sprinkle powdered sugar on top.

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Posted on February 6, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Slop Nuggets: Cookies You Make Without a Recipe

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When I was growing up I read a series of young adult mystery books about a girl who saw ghosts and solved mysteries as a result. The girl was named Nina Tanleven (she goes by Nine) and I loved the books, though I can’t tell you much about them today, since I haven’t cracked one of them in about 15 years. One thing I do remember from them is that Nine and her father (her mom had died, I think) liked to make cookies that they called slopnuggets. Slopnuggets were basically cookies made without a recipe. You just put things in a bowl that you thought should be in cookies, and stopped when it looked like cookie dough. Bake, and enjoy. Nine said that slopnuggets always turned out differently, but were generally delicious. And I remember that in the brief author biography of writer Bruce Coville, he noted that the books were fiction, but slopnuggets are real.

peanut butter molasses slopnuggets

Since I read the books I’ve been wanting to try my hand at slopnuggets, and this week I finally did it. When my washer broke and I needed to use a neighbor’s I decided to make her cookies as a thank you, and didn’t have time to look for a recipe, so it was time to get sloppy.

Turns out, making slopnuggets is really fun, and has generally yummy results (I say generally because in my second batch I accidentally used salt instead of sugar…and that was an unfixable error). Here are my tips for making successful slopnuggets, a perfect treat for a day when you’re cooped up inside because of a hurricane or a heat wave.

Start with dry ingredients:
You’ll probably want to use some kind of flour or oatmeal or a combination

Baking powder or soda
Spices (cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, cocoa)

Then add:
Sweetener of some kind
(sugar, brown sugar, molasses, honey, maple syrup, agave)

Then add:
Fat and liquids of some kind (oil, butter, peanut butter, pumpkin, yogurt, eggs, milk, juice)

And extract (vanilla, mint, lemon etc, depending on your mood and what you have on hand)

Once it’s the consistency of cookie dough, taste, adjust as needed, and add chocolate chips, raisins, nuts, and/or any other add-ins you’d like. Then drop by rounded tablespoons onto a greased cookie sheet. Bake at about 350F for about 15 minutes.

The con: you can’t give the recipe away when someone asks if you can share your maple walnut cookie recipe.

One of many pros: you never have to worry that you won’t have the ingredients necessary to make slopnuggets. It’s whatever you happen to have in the pantry.

A couple of hours ago I made a truly wonderful batch of peanut butter molasses cookies. I’m sure I could come up with a lovely fancy name for them, but I’m just calling them slopnuggets.

Posted on October 30, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Rainbow Cookies a la Hanukkah


I have a confession to make. I’m not proud of it but I feel compelled to share. You know how most Jewish gatherings serve the ubiquitous Assorted Cookie Platter? You know the ones I mean… Well, I confess: I hoard the multi-colored Rainbow Cookies.

I don’t intend to hoard them – in fact, I always start with just one. But I inevitably end up going back for seconds and thirds. I know… they’re called assorted cookies because you’re supposed to try several types.  I just can’t help myself! I love their moist and rich almond interior, lightened by a hint of acidic apricot and then intensified by a touch of bitter chocolate. Add the fun colors and you have the perfect cookie.

When planning this year’s Hanukkah gathering, I decided the festivities wouldn’t be complete without these cookies.  With just a tiny adjustment to my regular recipe, they became Rainbow Cookies á la Hanukkah. Making them is a multi-step process but, fear not, they are easy steps. Here’s the recipe:

About Joy Prevor: A food aficionado and graduate of Le Cordon Bleu, Joy Dawn Prevor has served as a major gifts fundraiser and senior executive in the Jewish nonprofit sector for over 17 years.

Rainbow cookies

Ingredients

2 1/2 sticks unsalted butter, softened
1 cup sugar
8 oz almond paste
1 teaspoon almond extract
4 large eggs
2 cups all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
6 drops blue food coloring
12 drops blue food coloring
12 oz apricot preserves, heated and strained
12 oz high-quality semisweet or bittersweet chocolate, melted

Directions

Preheat oven to 350F. Butter three 9 X 13 baking sheet pans and line with parchment paper. Beat almond paste in stand mixer until smooth. Add butter and sugar and beat until fluffy. Add almond extract and then eggs, one at a time. Add flour and salt - only beat until combined.
Divide batter into three bowls and add 6 drops of blue food coloring to one bowl and 12 drops of blue food coloring to a second bowl – leave the third bowl plain.

Spread each batter into its own pan and bake for approximately 10 minutes and cool on a wire rack. Once cooled, place one of the blue cakes on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper.  Spread preserves on it and place the plain cake on top. Spread preserves on plain cake and place the other blue cake on top. Freeze for 1 hour to set jam.
Spread melted chocolate on top and on sides – chill for 30 minutes to set. Flip cake onto another piece of parchment paper and spread chocolate on the other side – freeze for at least one hour. While still frozen, slice cake into 1 ½ inch logs and slice logs into individual ½ inch cookies. Allow cookies to defrost before serving

Posted on December 27, 2011

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Shabbat Recipe Roundup

Another week, another round of recipe ideas for your Shabbat table.

Last month I had the most delicious Caesar Brussel Sprout Salad at Almond in Bridgehampton, New York. Ever since I’ve been looking for a similar recipe, but in the meantime, I came across this Food Network Brussel Sprout Salad with a light dressing, and dried fruit. If you’re making this with a meat meal, just leave out the manchego cheese.

This Citrus and Rosemary Roast Chicken recipe is pretty similar to my own go-to chicken recipe for Shabbat dinner. My favorite tip? Marinate the chicken on Thursday night in a plastic bag, and let sit overnight in the fridge. By the time you roast your Shabbat chicken, it will be infused with flavor, and super moist.

I love roasted potatoes, but sometimes you want something a little more special. This “Potatoes a la Bakery” has a wow factor, yet is super simple to prepare. Just replace the butter in the recipe with olive oil, or my favorite, duck fat (chicken fat would work great too).

My mother-in-law made this recipe for Roasted Fennel with Olives and Garlic recently and it was delicious!

For a sweet finish, try some rich, chewy Peanut Butter Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookies from Couldn’t Be Pareve.

Posted on December 7, 2011

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

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