Tag Archives: chopped liver

How to Use Schmaltz

My friends, family and even random Facebook buddies all know that I love using schmaltz. But the most frequent question I receive on the topic: how should I use leftover chicken fat?

Let’s start at the beginning.

Photo credit: Amy Kritzer of What Jew Wanna Eat

Photo credit: Amy Kritzer of What Jew Wanna Eat

First, what is schmaltz and how do you make it? Schmaltz is most commonly chicken fat, but can also be duck fat (my favorite) or goose fat (even better).  You can buy chicken fat in most grocery stores or butcher shops, but it is also very easy to make.

Most Jews I know use their schmaltz once per year, when they make chopped liver. I will admit: I love having an excuse to go a little schmaltz crazy when I make my Tuscan-style liver every year for Passover. Or maybe even when making matzah balls. But there are lots of other ways to use up that fat for delicious results throughout the year.

I know some of you are ready to yell at me. Schmaltz is unhealthy! Why are you advocating adding more fat to your diet? And to you people I will say, you are probably reading the wrong blog. But also, I am not advocating more, regular, excessive schmaltz consumption; I just want to share some other ways to use small amounts of the fat in order to add lots of flavor.

Some of my favorite ways to use a little shmaltz in my cooking:

– Swap out half the oil in a base of a soup, and saute your onions, garlic and/or vegetables in the golden fat for an extra flavor boost.

– Make caramelized onions using schmaltz for a great sandwich or hamburger topping.

– Swap out some of the oil in a savory noodle kugel or potato kugel recipe for schmaltz

– Drizzle on top of roasted vegetables or potatoes.

fries1

And even more great recipes ideas:

Duck fat french fries from The Food Network

Deviled eggs with schmaltz and gribenes

Chicken fat roasted vegetables with gremolata from Food and Wine

Ultra crispy potatoes from Serious Eats

Green beans with schmaltz fried shallots from Melinda Strauss

Blueberry port duck with duck fat potatoes from Busy in Brooklyn

duck-breast-with-potatoes

Has your schmaltz craving and questions been answered? If not get yourself a copy of Michael Ruhlman’s Book of Schmaltz for even more recipes and tips.

Great recipes to share? Still more questions? Post below!

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Posted on January 27, 2015

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Chopped Liver with Apple Reduction

Yield:
8 servings

Chopped liver is one of the most iconic Jewish dishes. It’s been consumed spread on top of challah and matzah for generations. But the Ashkenazi version doesn’t really do much to impress me, with only onions to add flavor, I find the taste bland.

liver-nosher

I wanted to create something that would enhance the naturally rich flavor of liver. So I looked for inspiration from more Middle Eastern flavors. Ironically, nothing is more Israeli than Turkish coffee. And perhaps also surprising is that the bitterness of the coffee really compliments the liver and apple flavors.

The result is a classic Jewish dish with an elegant twist and a really delicious taste.

 

Chopped Liver with Apple Reduction

Posted on March 30, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Passover Recipes: Tuscan Style Chopped Liver



chopped-liver-stampOne of my favorite recent Passover recipes is an Italian style liver spread, instead of traditional chopped liver. This recipe is…unctuous. Rich, sweet, flavorful, and will blow your traditional mom’s (or bubbe’s) chunky liver out of the water. This recipe is NOT for those who are looking for a healthy alternative. This recipe is best for people looking for an indulgent dish, because yes, it has fat in it.

Traditional Tuscan style liver spread calls for a special wine made in the region called Vin Santo, which of course is difficult (though not impossible) to find kosher. So instead of using the elusive sweet Vin Santo wine, I recommend using a sweet red wine, or even dare I say it.

Ok, I’ll whisper: Manischewitz.

I like to broil my own livers, but there is no reason you can’t use already broiled livers from the butcher.

Tuscan Style Chopped Liver

Posted on March 29, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy