Tag Archives: challah

Beyond French Toast: Recipes for Leftover Challah

I don’t know about you, but whenever I peak into my freezer, I am overwhelmed by the immeasurable number of bags of leftover challah that I have put away. I hate wasting the leftover challah slices and scraps after Shabbat, and yet I so infrequently find uses for them.

So I decided it was high time to put all that challah to delicious good use, beyond just bread pudding (delicious) and french toast on Sunday (the perfect breakfast).

Here are a variety of ideas for how to use up those leftover morsels that may actually get you excited about all those bags of bread in the freezer.

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Berry Cream Cheese Stuffed Challah French Toast

Challah Panzanella Salad with Butternut Squash, Dates and Hazelnuts from Food52

French Onion Soup with Challah and Munster Cheese

Baked French Toast

cgctoast


Cheesy Garlic Challah Toast

Challah Croutons from The Domesticated Wolf

Challah Bread Crumbs from Granoladox

Chocolate-Chocolate Bread Pudding

Mushroom Challah Stuffing from Amy Kritzer

challah dressing

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Posted on February 14, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Berry-Stuffed Challah French Toast

Yield:
4 servings

Having leftover challah has never been a bad thing. Sunday morning brunches, Shabbat afternoon sandwiches; the options go on. Since I am hosting most Friday nights and am constantly left with challah I decided I needed to be a little more creative with the leftovers.

This past weekend I also happened to have a bowl of mixed berries left over and knew right away this was the week to leave my comfort zone and make stuffed challah french toast using both these delicious remains.

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French toast is one of my favorite foods and eat it any time of day. And now that I have created this challah masterpiece, I may never stop.  I even went as far as to make homemade blueberry syrup to go on top, but you can leave this step out if you prefer plain maple syrup.

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Berry-Stuffed Challah French Toast

Ingredients

For the French toast:

1/2 loaf leftover challah

½ cup mixed berries

4oz cream cheese, at room temperature

1 ½ tsp vanilla

3 eggs

1 Tbsp cinnamon

1 tsp maple syrup

½ cup milk

Butter or oil for pan

For the blueberry syrup

½ cup of sugar

1 Tbsp cornstarch

½ cup water

½ cup of fresh blueberries

½ tsp cinnamon

1 Tbsp butter

Pinch of salt

Directions

To make the French toast:

Slice the challah into 2-inch thick pieces. Using a paring knife, cut a deep slit across the top in the middle of each slice, approximately 4 inches long - This will form your “pocket.” Once you’re done, set the bread aside.

Put the room temperature cream cheese, vanilla and mixed berries in a bowl and combine using a wooden spoon. The berries will crush a bit and that is good. Mix well.

In a separate bowl, add 2 eggs, cinnamon, maple syrup, and milk. Mix well.

Take the fruit-cream cheese mixture and stuff into the "pockets" of the challah.

When done stuffing each piece of bread, completely coat each piece in egg mixture. Make sure all sides are covered.

Put butter or oil into a hot skillet and melt completely. Add the stuffed challah to the skillet and cook roughly about 3-6 minutes on each side, until it reaches a nice golden brown. You want to make sure the cream cheese mixture heats through.

To make the blueberry syrup:

Combine sugar, cornstarch and water over medium heat. Cook for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the blueberries and simmer for 10 minutes stirring occasionally. Add the butter, cinnamon and salt simmer for another 2 minutes. Transfer to a serving bowl.

Top the stuffed French toast with berry syrup.

Posted on February 8, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

French Onion Soup with Challah and Munster Cheese

Yield:
6 servings

Most weeks it’s hard to find a crumb of challah leftover after Shabbat, especially since my husband and I love hosting our friends for Shabbat dinner whenever we can.

But every few weeks or so we like to enjoy a quiet Shabbat just the three of us, and when this happens, there is inevitably part of a challah loaf leftover.

veggie-french-onion-soup-stOf course, I make French toast. I make croutons, bread crumbs and even bread pudding. But sometimes a gal just wants to try something new.

I found this recipe from the Inventive Vegetarian and knew I wanted to use up some of my challah to finish off a rich bowl of French Onion Soup. Topped with bubbling, melted munster cheese and you have a Jewish version of this iconic soup. The onions make the soup sweet, and the richness of both the eggy challah and gooey munster cheese make each bite practically sinfulveggie-onion-soup-stamped

French Onion Soup with Challah and Munster Cheese

Ingredients

2 medium onions, thinly sliced

1 Tbsp olive oil

1 Tbsp butter

½ tsp sugar

1 ½ Tbsp all-purpose flour

½ cup white wine

6 cups vegetable stock

1-2 cups water

Salt and pepper to taste

6 pieces leftover challah

6 pieces sliced munster cheese

Special equipment: individual ramekins

Directions

Heat the oil and butter in a large pot over medium-low heat.

Add onions and allow to cook for 12-15 minutes. Don’t worry about fussing with them too much right now, you will be stirring later.
After 15 minutes, add the sugar and stir. Allow the onions to caramelize for the next 30 to 40 minutes, stirring frequently. If the onions are getting crispy make sure to lower the heat.

After the onions are fully caramelized, sprinkle the flour over them and cook for about three minutes, continuing to stir.
Next, add the wine, deglazing the bottom of the pan as you stir.

Add the stock and the water, continuing to stir. Add salt and pepper to taste. Bring the soup to a simmer and allow to cook another 30 minutes.

Add several ladles full of soup to each individual ramekin.

Toast your challah pieces and place on top of soup. Add a slice of Munster on top of challah round and place under the broiler for 3-5 minutes, or until cheese is bubbling and just beginning to brown.

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Posted on February 4, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Pastrami Sandwich Challah

Yield:
1 large challah

When I was in high school, I had the most wonderful English teacher (that’s you, Mr. Scanlon!) who quoted Emerson, roughly, saying that we all contradict ourselves.

I often feel like I am the epitome of contradiction where eating and cooking is concerned. I strive to keep a mostly vegetarian diet, but sometimes I can’t help it. I relish making something fatty and delicious using red meat. And my Pastrami Sandwich Challah fits this bill precisely.

Pastrami Sandwich ChallahStuffing my challah with meat all began with my famous challah dogs (stay tuned for that recipe!). But recently I had a hankering to stuff my challah with something else. Ground beef? Seemed messy. Chicken? So dry. But then I thought of the North American classic deli roll—a dish I did not grow up with, and which I find both disgusting and delicious. And the idea for this crazy new challah began to take shape.

Pastrami Sandwich ChallahIf you have a local butcher as an option, please please please go get freshly sliced pastrami. Thin is best—a thick-cut pastrami will not result in the same consistency.

Make sure not to spread the Russian dressing on too thick, or you could end up with a leaky challah. I know that sounds delicious, but it might not make for such a pretty-looking challah.

Pastrami Sandwich ChallahLet us know if you try this. I’d love to hear modifications!

Pastrami Sandwich Challah

Ingredients

5 cups of all purpose flour

1/4 cup vegetable oil

½ Tbsp salt

1 Tbsp onion powder

½ cup sugar

1 ½ cups lukewarm water

1 Tbsp yeast

1 tsp sugar

2 eggs plus one egg yolk

1/8-1/4 lb thinly sliced pastrami

3 Tbsp ketchup

1 Tbsp mayo

Poppy seeds

Dried minced onion

Thick sea salt (optional)

Directions

Proof yeast by placing yeast, sugar and lukewarm water in a small bowl. Stir gently just once or twice. Allow to sit around 10 minutes, until it becomes foamy on top.

In a large bowl or stand mixer fitted with whisk attachment, mix together 1 1/2 cups flour, salt, onion powder and sugar. After the water-yeast mixture has become foamy, add to flour mixture along with oil. Mix thoroughly.

Add another cup of flour and 2 eggs until smooth (save extra egg yolk for later). Switch to the dough hook attachment if you are using a stand mixer.

Add another 1 1/2 cups flour and then remove from bowl and place on a floured surface. Knead remaining flour into dough, continuing to knead for around 10 minutes (or however long your hands will last).

Place dough in a greased bowl and cover with damp towel. Allow to rise 3-4 hours.

After dough has risen, roll out dough using a rolling pin until it is about ½ inch thick. Mix ketchup and mayo in a small bowl and spread a thin layer all over the dough.

Lay pastrami down in a single layer overlapping pieces only slightly.

Working quickly, start rolling up the dough towards you. Try and keep the roll relatively tight as you go. Pinch the end when you finish.

Create a pinwheel shaped-challah by snaking the dough around and around in a circle around itself. When finished, tuck the end under the challah neatly and pinch lightly. This doesn't have to be perfect - remember, as long as it tastes good, almost no one will care what it looks like.

Allow challah to rise another hour. This extra rise will ensure fluffy challah.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Brush challah with beaten egg yolk and sprinkle with poppy seeds, dried onion and a touch of thick sea salt (optional). Bake challah for 27-30 minutes or until golden brown on top.

Serve warm.

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Posted on January 30, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Challah with a Chinese Twist

Love challah? Love Chinese food? You can’t believe the luck you’re in: Challah with a Chinese Twist!

scallion-challah-dough

Hold onto your challah covers, Noshers!

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Molly Yeh, a rocking young Chinese-American Jew and world-class baker just came up with an incredible recipe that celebrates her mixed heritage. And we’re so glad she did!

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Find her gloriously easy and delicious recipe here. “Inspired by the scallion pancake,” she writes.

We’re in food-love!

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Posted on January 22, 2014

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Enter Our Winter Giveaway to Win Fresh Kosher Nosh!

Bagels, rugelach, and babka, oh my!

The most delicious giveaway of the winter is officially on until Thursday, December 19, and four of you are about to win a selection of incredible kosher goodies from our friends at Kosher Gift Box, our favorite online purveyor of Jewish nosh. For FREE.

The grand prize—get ready for it—is the NYC Brunch Basket, full of fresh bagels, rugelach, lox, and cream cheese ($119.99 value) sent overnight straight to your front door.

bagels and lox

a Rafflecopter giveaway

And the lucky runners-up?

One will get this Collector’s Tin of Rugelach ($44.99 value).

rugelach tin

Another: this Fresh Challah Variety Pack with four delicious flavors ($34.99 value).

challah pack

And the third: this amazing Babka Two-Pack with cinnamon and chocolate loaves. (Because why choose?) ($27.99 value).

Babka Set

Scroll back up to enter today!

Update! The winners are in! Congratulations to Jeff of Nashville, Tennessee; Natali of Hollywood, Florida; Erin of Niagara Falls, New York; and Alicia of West Bloomfield, Michigan. Happy noshing!

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Posted on December 12, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Kindergarten Challah Recipe

Prep:
35-45 minutes, plus 4-8 hours to rise

Cook:
35-45 minutes

Yield:
3 loaves

I went to Jewish day school from pre-school all the way through 12th grade, and looking back, there were definitely some lessons that had a much bigger impact than others. Perhaps my most enduring lesson is one I got way back in kindergarten at Solomon Schechter: challah baking. The teachers guided us through the recipe, and eventually gave each child a small mound of dough to shape into a challah that we took home at the end of the day. We also took home a piece of paper with the recipe typed on it, and it has been my go-to challah recipe ever since. kindergarten challah

Since kindergarten I’ve made this challah hundreds of times. I’ve made it on three continents, at four universities, and in half a dozen homes. It never disappoints. I hope it brings as much doughy goodness to your table as it has to mine. Shabbat shalom!

Kindergarten Challah

Ingredients

2 packages yeast (about 2 Tablespoons)
1/2 cup very warm water
1 teaspoon sugar
5 eggs
3/4 cup sugar
1/2 cup oil
1 1/2 cups water
1 teaspoon salt
8-10 cups flour
1 teaspoon cardamom (optional)
1 Tablespoon honey (optional)
2 Tablepoons maple syrup (optional)
1 Tablespoon vanilla (optional)
1 cup raisins (optional)
1 beaten egg
Poppy or Sesame seeds

Directions

Dissolve the yeast in the warm water from the tap with 1 teaspoon sugar. Let sit for 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, beat eggs with sugar. Add oil, water and salt. If you'd like a sweeter challah, add honey or maple syrup. For a little spice in your challah, add cardamom and vanilla.

Mix yeast mixture into egg mixture, using beaters, your hands, or the dough hook on a standing mixer. Add 2 cups of flour at a time, mixing between additions (feel free to substitute whole wheat flour for up to 3 cups of regular flour). When the dough gets thick and sticky, turn it out onto a floured counter and knead the flour in by hand. Stop kneading when it seems like the dough will not accept any more flour (usually about 9 cups of flour). Put the dough back in the bowl and cover loosely with a kitchen towel. Let sit for at least 4 hours, up to 8 hours.

After the dough has risen for at least four hours, punch it down, and knead in raisins if you'd like to us them. Then divide the dough into three sections. Each section will be a loaf. Braid or shape the challot however you like. (The Shiksa has a wonderful and very comprehensive guide to braiding and shaping challah dough here.)

Once the loaves are braided or shaped, place them on cookie sheets, and cover loosely with a towel. Allow to rise at least another half hour, preferably an hour. Preheat the oven to 350F. Then, beat an egg, and brush it lightly on each challah, making sure to get the egg wash in all the crevices of the loaf. Sprinkle the tops with poppy or sesame seeds if you wish. Bake the challot for 30-40 minutes, or until they are golden brown on top, and are making your kitchen smell like heaven.

Posted on March 1, 2013

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Photo Contest: YOUR BEST CHALLAH!

Everyone loves challah…and these days, everyone loves photos of beautiful, homemade food – especially challah!

So, this week and next we are looking for the prettiest challah in all the land. Email your best homemade challah photo to TheNosher.Contests@gmail.com by 10 PM on Monday, October 29, or upload it to Facebook and tag @Jewish Food, and you could win a copy of one of our library’s most beautiful  cookbooks: The Whole Foods Kosher Kitchen by Lévana Kirschenbaum.

Need some help? Check out the picture above – those are my “Everything Bagel Challah Rolls.” We can’t wait to see your scrumptious-looking challah!

Posted on October 18, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Shabbat Recipe Roundup

It’s almost time for Purim, so no better way to start Shabbat than with this creative recipe for Hamantaschen Challah!

I love classic roasted chicken for Shabbat dinner, but sometimes you need something a little different. Try this Spinach Stuffed Roasted Chicken from Overtime Cook as a new twist on classic Friday night chicken.

These Israeli Stuffed Vegetables from The Jewish Hostess are a great side dish, but also hearty enough to serve as a main dish for your vegetarian friends or family.

No matter how many times I make brussel sprouts, or how many recipes I come across, I simply cannot get enough! This week I came across this simple, tasty recipe for Zesty Fried Brussel Sprouts, which makes a perfect veggie side.

You are probably trying out some different Hamantaschen recipes, so how about these Brilliant Lemon Sunshine Hamantaschen from Pragmatic Attic as a sweet ending.

Shabbat Shalom and happy cooking!

Posted on March 2, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Shabbat Recipes of the Week

Another week, and it’s time for another round of recipe ideas for Shabbat.

As my dear friend and fellow tweeter Aimee Weiss points out, ’tis the season for some spiked apple cider! Why not start out your meal with some hot cider with rum, honey and your favorite spices. You can also make a German favorite called Gluhwein (pronounced gloo-vine), which is a hot mulled wine with oranges, cloves, allspice and cinnamon. I can’t get enough of this stuff!

I’ve been eyeing this recipe for Bucatini with Cauliflower and Brussel Sprouts for weeks in this month’s copy of Food and Wine. If you are serving a meat meal, just leave off the parmesan cheese! A perfect hearty and healthful dish for this time of year.

Instead of a traditional roasted chicken, why not try this hearty Chicken Cacciatore – seems like this would go nicely with some pasta or even a good piece of challah.

And for dessert, check out these Baked Pumpkin and Sour Cream Puddings from Smitten Kitchen. Looking for a pareve dessert? How about the Kosher Gastronome’s Awesome Brownies.

Shabbat Shalom, and happy eating!

Posted on November 17, 2011

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

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