Tag Archives: appetizer

Chopped Liver with Apple Reduction

Yield:
8 servings

Chopped liver is one of the most iconic Jewish dishes. It’s been consumed spread on top of challah and matzah for generations. But the Ashkenazi version doesn’t really do much to impress me, with only onions to add flavor, I find the taste bland.

liver-nosher

I wanted to create something that would enhance the naturally rich flavor of liver. So I looked for inspiration from more Middle Eastern flavors. Ironically, nothing is more Israeli than Turkish coffee. And perhaps also surprising is that the bitterness of the coffee really compliments the liver and apple flavors.

The result is a classic Jewish dish with an elegant twist and a really delicious taste.

 

Chopped Liver with Apple Reduction

Ingredients

1 heaping Tbsp Turkish coffee or instant espresso

2 Tbsp honey

1 lb chicken livers

½ cup warm water

½ tsp ground cloves

1/3 cup balsamic vinegar

¼ cup apple cider vinegar

1 Tbsp brown sugar

3 green apples, peeled and diced

Directions

Place the Turkish coffee (or instant espresso) and honey in the bottom of a heat proof bowl. Stir in the hot water until the honey dissolves.

Add the livers and let marinate for at least 4 hours or overnight.

Heat a small pot over a medium heat along with the cloves, vinegars and brown sugar.

Once the contents of the pot begins to simmer add the apples.

Lower the heat to medium low and cover the pot. Allow the apples to cook for half an hour.

The apples should be soft and darkened slightly when they are ready. After the apples are done cooking, use a slotted spoon and remove them from the pot leaving whatever liquid remains in the pot.

Raise the heat under the pot to medium high and drain all the liquid from the bowl except approximately 2 Tbsp worth of the marinade.

Add the liver and marinade to the pot and cook the livers until there are no more visible pink parts.

Combine the liver and cooked apples in a medium bowl and mash until desired consistency. For a smoother consistency you can use a food processor fitted with blade attachment.

Posted on March 30, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Rosemary Hamantaschen with Balsamic Caramelized Onion Jam

Yield:
1 1/2 dozen

I have never really loved the idea of savory hamantaschen. My sweet tooth just revolts at the concept. But after some poking and prodding from others, I decided: fine. I would try and make some savory hamantaschen.

A few weeks ago I made some balsamic caramelized onions to go on top of homemade pizza. They were amazing. Sweet and savory – my favorite combination. So as I was thinking about what kinds of savory hamantaschen I might try to make, I realized a sweet, savory onion jam was the perfect compromise to satisfy both sweet and savory cravings.

rosemary-hamantashen

My husband serves as my trusty taste-tester and critic for all my creations, so I am happy to share that he LOVED this version. And I hope you will, too.

Rosemary Hamantaschen with Balsamic Caramelized Onion Jam

Ingredients

For the Hamantaschen dough:

½ cup butter (or margarine)

½ cup granulated sugar

1 egg

1 Tbsp milk

1 ½ cups all-purpose flour

¼ tsp baking powder

¼ tsp salt

2 Tbsp chopped fresh rosemary

For the onion jam filling:

4 small-medium onions, thinly sliced

3 Tbsp olive oil

1 1/2 Tbsp butter

1/4 cup balsamic vinegar

2-3 Tbsp red wine

salt and pepper

3 Tbsp greek yogurt

Directions

To make the dough:

Beat the butter and sugar together until smooth. Add egg, milk and rosemary until mixed thoroughly.

Sift together the flour, baking powder and salt. Add dry mixture to wet mixture until incorporated.

Note: if the dough is too soft, increase flour amount by a few Tbsp at a time until firm.

Chill dough for at least 1 hour or up to 24 hours.

To make the onion jam filling:

Add oil and butter to saute pan over medium heat. Once butter has melted, add onions to the pan, stirring frequently for 10-15 minutes. If onions are browning too quickly reduce to low-medium heat.

When onions are completely translucent and soft, add balsamic vinegar and continue stirring for another 5-10 minutes. When onions seem sticky and the vinegar has reduced, add wine and stir. Scrape any bits off bottom of pan.

Add salt and pepper to taste. Remove onions from heat and set aside.

When onions have cooled, place onions in a food processor fitted with blade. Pulse until smooth. Mix in greek yogurt.

To assemble:

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Dust surface with flour to keep from sticking. Roll the dough to about ¼ inch thick.

Using a round cookie cutter, cut out circle and place onto cookie sheet. To keep the dough from sticking to your cutter, dip in flour before each cut.

Fill each round with onion jam and using your favorite method, pinch corners together tightly.

Bake for 7-9 minutes.

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Posted on February 17, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Game Day Snacks Roundup

The Super Bowl is a week away, so the men in my life tell me. I am not much for subscribing to traditional gender roles, but I admit freely: I hate football. But I do love cooking up snacks for football-viewing especially spicy chicken wings and beef-stuffed knishes.

Looking for some kosher snack ideas for the football fans in your life? We have some great dairy, meat, pareve and gluten free ideas from our recipe archives and our favorite bloggers.

What will you be cooking up? Share below!

game day snacks

Roasted Garlic Hummus (pareve) 

Beet Chips with Spicy Honey Mayo (pareve)

beet-chips-1

Mediterranean Seven Layer Dip from The Shiksa (dairy)

Pesto Potato Pinwheels from The Overtime Cook (pareve)

Beef and Potato Puff Pastry Knishes (meat)

Spinach and Cheese Borekas (dairy) 

Pastrami on Rye Potstickers from What Jew Wanna Eat (meat)

Classic Hot Wings (meat)

Sweet and Spicy Asian Wings (meat)

Fried Pickles from The Food Yenta (dairy)

buckeye bites

Buckeye Bites from The Kosher Cave Girl (pareve)

Speculoos Chex Party Mix from Busy in Brooklyn (dairy)

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Posted on January 25, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

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