Author Archives: Shannon Sarna

Shannon Sarna

About Shannon Sarna

Shannon Sarna is an avid baker, blogger and all around food-lover. Born to an Italian mother who loved to bake, a Jewish father who loved to experiment, and a food chemist grandfather, loving and experimenting with diverse foods is simply in her blood. When she isn't tweeting, eating, or tweeting what she's eating, Shannon spends her time in Jersey City, NJ with her daughter, her husband, and her rescue dog, Otis.

Honey Whole Wheat Challah

Yield:
2 small loaves, or one large loaf

honey whole wheat challah

Dreaming up crazy flavors of challah like pastrami sandwich challah, balsamic apple date challah or gruyere and pesto stuffed challah is one of my greatest joys as a baker. But sometimes I do long for a simpler challah, and have even been known to make whole wheat challah. Yes, it’s true. I hope you were sitting for that.

challah-yum
I use a half whole wheat, half all-purpose unbleached flour ratio when making my whole wheat challah. Yes, you could try to use all whole wheat flour, but challah is supposed to be light and fluffy, and whole wheat flour is simply more dense. Because the whole wheat flour is denser, I make sure to be particularly patient when letting it rise: for the first rise I allow 4 hours, and for the second rise another 1 1/2 hours. It may seem like a lot, but the result is worth it. My mother-in-law even commented about this challah, “this is sinful.” Whole wheat challah? Sinful? Well, I will take it. And especially from my mother-in-law!

challah-yum2

I also like to add ground flax seed in the challah for a little extra dose of healthiness which is impossible to detect. And inspired by the beautiful, Israeli challot of Breads Bakery, I love to add pumpkin seeds, whole flax seeds, oats, sesame seeds, black sesame seeds and even sunflower seeds on top for a fun and healthy crunch.

multi

This honey whole wheat challah is perfect for Rosh Hashanah. And instead of a savory topping like the ones I just mentioned, you could add a sprinkle of cinnamon sugar on top for an extra sweet, and healthy, new year ahead.

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Honey Whole Wheat Challah

Ingredients

1 ¼ cups lukewarm water
1 ½ Tbsp dry yeast
1 tsp sugar
2 ½ cups all purpose unbleached flour
2-2 ½ cups whole wheat flour
2 Tbsp ground flax seed
½ Tbsp salt
¼ cup vegetable oil
½ cup sugar
¼ cup honey
2 eggs
2 egg yolks + 1 tsp water + 1 tsp honey
Whole flax seed, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, sesame seeds, poppy seeds (optional)
Thick sea salt (optional)

Directions

In a small bowl, place yeast, 1 tsp sugar and lukewarm water. Allow to sit around 10 minutes, until it becomes foamy on top.

In a large bowl or stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, mix together ¾ cup whole wheat flour, ¾ cup all-purpose flour, salt and sugar. After the water-yeast mixture has become foamy, add to flour mixture along with oil and honey. Mix thoroughly. Pro tip: use the same cup to measure the honey as you used for the oil which will allow for easier clean-up of the sticky honey.

Add another ½ cup whole wheat flour, ½ cup regular flour and eggs and mix until smooth. Switch to the dough hook attachment if you are using a stand mixer.

Add another 1 ½- 2 cups of mixed flour, mixing thoroughly and then remove from bowl and place on a floured surface. Knead remaining ½ cup flour into dough, continuing to knead for around 10 minutes (or however long your hands will last).

Place dough in a greased bowl and cover with damp towel. Allow to rise at least 4 hours, punching down at least once if possible.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Braid challah into desired shape. Allow challah to rise another 90 minutes, or until you can see the size has grown and challah seems light. This step is very important to ensure a light and fluffy challah.

In a small bowl beat 2 egg yolks with 1 tsp water and 1 tsp honey.

Brush egg wash liberally over challah. Sprinkle with seeds and thick sea salt if desired.

If making one large challah, bake around 28 minutes; if making two smaller challahs, bake 24-26 minutes. When making round challot, make sure the middle has cooked through, which might require an extra 1-2 minutes baking time.

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Posted on September 18, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

A New Sesame on the Block

Yield:
6-8 servings

Sesame seems to be enjoying a moment in the spotlight recently and I couldn’t be happier. Halva was always a staple in my house growing up, and now as an adult I am always looking for ways to include it in baked goods (like my halva swirl brownies) and other dishes. Earlier this year I was introduced to a sesame-based spread that my daughter and I both really enjoyed. In fact the jar has long been licked clean.

The newest halva spread business on the block is Brooklyn Sesame, started by native Israeli and expert “raw halva” maker Shahar Shamir who has been making and serving his all natural spreads for years for friends and family. Shahar actually never intended to start the small food business. Rather, he wanted to open a café, but when met with several challenges, his friends suggested he started selling his halva spread instead. And so Brooklyn Sesame was born.

brooklyn sesame

In Israel it is common to eat halva or tahini with breakfast, as a snack or for dessert. And while the fat content of tahini has been a turnoff for some Americans, that perception is starting to change as it is more widely acknowledged that good fats from items like nuts and sesame can produce long-term health benefits and even help with weight-loss.

Shahar himself admitted that he gained 7 pounds this last holiday season when he took a break from making his halva spread. There weren’t any open jars lying around, and so he was eating less of the super food.  “When I eat my halva, I am not eating other junk and I believe sesame and honey are great for digestion,” Shahar shared.

 

Brooklyn Sesame’s spreads come in six different varieties including pistachio, cocoa, black caraway seeds and toasted coconut. The high-quality spreads with a “Brooklyn sensibility” have even caught the attention of The New York Times, Food and Wine and Real Simple among many others.

Brooklyn Sesame logo

Have a halva craving? The halva spreads are available in more than 25 stores in the New York area, one store in Massachusetts or you can order from their website.

You can also try whipping up one of Shahar’s signature recipes this holiday season and use some rich, sweet halva spread to usher in the New Year.

The following recipes are courtesy of Jörg Thoene, Leah Koenig and Shahar Shamir.

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baklava-tarts

Apple and Coconut Halva Baklava Tarts

INGREDIENTS

1 small Granny Smith apple, peeled, cored, and finely chopped

zest of 1 lemon

1 Tbsp fresh lemon juice

1/3 cup packed light brown sugar

1/2 cup finely chopped pistachios

1/2 cup finely chopped walnuts

1 tsp cinnamon

1/4 tsp cardamom

6 sheets thawed filo dough

6 Tbsp unsalted butter, melted (or substitute vegetable or coconut oil)

1/4 cup Brooklyn Sesame Halva Spread with Toasted Coconut, divided

Honey, for drizzling

DIRECTIONS

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees and set aside a 12-cup muffin tin.

In a bowl, stir together the apple, lemon zest, lemon juice, and brown sugar; let stand for 10 minutes until it gets juicy. Stir in the pistachios, walnuts, cinnamon, and cardamom.

Place 1 sheet of filo dough on a cutting board (cover the remaining sheets with a damp towel so they do not dry out), and gently brush all over with the melted butter. Place a second sheet on top of the first and continue in this fashion, alternating brushing with butter and stacking filo sheets until there are 6 layers. Use a sharp knife to cut the filo sheet into 12 squares. Arrange 1 square into each well of the muffin tin, pressing it into the bottom and sides.

Spoon 1 teaspoon of Halva Spread into the bottom of each cup, then fill two-thirds of the way with the apple-nut mixture. Brush edges of each pastry with a little more melted butter; bake until the pastry is golden, 15-20 minutes. Let cool for 10 minutes in the tin, then carefully remove tarts to a wire rack. Just before serving, drizzle each tart with a little honey.

lamb-stew

 

Lamb Stew with Dates and Black Caraway Halva Spread

Ingredients

3 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, divided
3 pounds lamb stew meat, cut into 1 1/2-inch cubes
2 yellow onions, finely chopped
2 carrots, peeled and chopped, optional
4 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 tsp ground cumin
1/4 tsp crushed red pepper flakes, or more to taste
1/2 cup dry white or red wine
1 1/2 cups beef or vegetable stock
1 14 oz can diced tomatoes, with their juice
1/4 cup chopped dried dates
3 Tbsp Brooklyn Sesame Halva Spread with Black Caraway Seeds
kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
Finely chopped fresh parsley, for serving

Directions

Heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil in a large Dutch oven or heavy-bottomed pot set over medium-high heat.
Working in batches (do not crowd the pan), add the lamb cubes and sear, turning with tongs, until well-browned on all sides. Transfer browned lamb to a plate and set aside.
Add remaining tablespoon of oil to the pot, then add onions, carrots, if using, and a pinch of salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, until softened and lightly browned, 5-10 minutes. Add the garlic, cumin, and red pepper flakes and continue cooking, stirring constantly, until fragrant, 1-2 minutes.
Add the meat back to the pot along with the wine, stock, and tomatoes; bring mixture to a simmer, then reduce heat to low, cover, and cook, stirring occasionally, until meat is cooked through, about 1 hour.
Stir in the dates and Halva Spread, turn heat up to medium-low, and continue cooking, uncovered and stirring occasionally, until fruit softens and the stew thickens slightly, about 5 minutes. (It will continue to thicken as it cools.) Season with salt and pepper to taste.
To serve, transfer stew to a shallow bowl, sprinkle with parsley.

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Posted on September 15, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Apple Kugel Crumble Cake

Yield:
8-10 servings

 

apple noodle crumble kugel cake

I love noodle kugel, especially my husband’s salt and pepper noodle kugel, which is always a hit at any Shabbat or holiday meal we serve it. But I really wanted to create a sweetened version of noodle kugel for Rosh Hashanah this year using some fresh, local apples.

I tried this recipe several ways until I found the right balance of apples, sugar, eggs and crumb topping. The result is a kugel that is sweet, but not too sweet, moist but still has a rich, crunchy crumb topping.

It brings together the goodness of a fall apple crumble, with the tradition of a noodle kugel. Oh yeah, and I decided it should get baked in a springform pan so that it looks like a “cake” which is just so much fun. Don’t worry – you can still serve it as a side dish.

apple-noodle-kugel-cake-2

If you decide to bake yours in a springform pan, make sure the bottom is locked in place tightly before pouring the unbaked kugel mixture into the pan. If it isn’t, you could end up with a liquidy mess all over your kitchen. I mean, I am not saying that happened to me (it did), but just making a recommendation.

apple-noodle-kugel-cake-4

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Apple Kugel Crumble Cake

Ingredients

For the kugel:
1 12 ounce package wide egg noodles
8 large eggs
1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
2 tsp vanilla
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 cup + 2 Tbsp brown sugar
3 medium apples, peeled and sliced thin

For the topping:
3/4 cup flour
1 cup old fashioned oats
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp nutmeg
1/2 cup margarine or butter, chilled and cut into pieces
1/4 tsp salt

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 9 inch springform pan or pyrex dish for baking. If using a springform pan, cover bottom in foil and place on a flat baking sheet to avoid spills.

Bring a large pot of water to boil. Cook noodles around 8-10 minutes. Drain and set aside.

In a large bowl whisk together eggs, cinnamon, nutmeg, vanilla, salt and brown sugar. Add sliced apples and mix gently until coated completely.

In a separate bowl, mix the flour, oats, brown sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt. Add the margarine or butter and using a pastry cutter or two knives, cut into the dry mixture until even, coarse crumbs form.

When noodles have been drained, add to egg mixture and mix gently until coated completely. Pour mixture into prepared baking pan. Sprinkle crumb mixture evenly on top of noodles.

Bake for 40-45 minutes, until noodles have set and crumb topping starts to brown. Serve warm or room temperature.

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Posted on September 11, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

End of Summer Party Recipes

The summer ain’t over yet, but before we know it Rosh Hashanah and the frenzy of holidays will be upon us. So take this opportunity for one last summer bash.

You can serve hot dogs, hamburgers and all the fixins you like. But how about adding a few new dishes to liven up your long weekend festivities?

Check out some of our summery suggestions below and get cooking.

cherry-basil-lemonade

Get the party started

Cherry Basil Limonana from Busy in Brooklyn

Strawberry Lemonade Martini

Peachy Summer White Sangria

Israeli Salad Ceviche with homemade chips

Israeli Salad Ceviche from Melinda Strauss

Bloody Mary Gazpacho

bbq-honey-chicken-2

The main event

Roast Chicken with Spicy Honey BBQ Sauce

Grilled Fish Tacos with Spicy Slaw in Lettuce Wraps from Kosher Like Me

Grilled Korean Ribs

Grilled Corn and Pastrami Salad from The Overtime Cook

Charred String Bean and Peaches from Beauty and Some Beef

Charred String Beans and Peaches

A sweet finish

Berry Crumble Pie

Strawberry Coconut Ice Pops from Gluten Flee

Tri-Color Melon Salad with Mint Syrup

Tri Color Melon Salad with Mint Syrupd

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Posted on August 28, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Bulgur Salad with Chicken, Roasted Corn and Tomatoes

Yield:
2 servings

Earlier this spring I was reading through my copy of the cookbook Jerusalem and came across a recipe for bulgur-stuffed eggplant with raisins, pine nuts and parsley. Sounded delicious, except for one thing: I had never cooked bulgur before. In fact, I barely knew what bulgar was.

Bulgur Salad with chicken roasted corn and cherry tomatoes

I walked the few short blocks to my nearest neighborhood store and picked up a bag, ready to recreate the delicious-sounding recipe. Well, bulgur turns out to be super easy to make (the same as rice) and incredibly satisfying. Nevertheless, I stuffed the bag away in my cabinet after making the recipe and sort of forgot about the grain.

Bulgur Salad with chicken roasted corn and cherry tomatoes

Just last week I was looking through my cabinets for some cooking inspiration, and rediscovered the bulgur. And it was one of those moments where I just decided to throw together a bunch of stuff I had in the fridge and it turned out delicious: leftover roasted chicken, fresh roasted corn, cherry tomatoes, cucumber and fresh herbs. It was delicious, hearty while still being a fresh and light summer dinner.

Want to make this dish vegetarian? Swap out the chicken for some chickpeas instead.

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Bulgur Salad with Chicken, Roasted Corn and Tomatoes

Ingredients

1/2 cup uncooked bulgur
1 cup water
1 Tbsp olive oil
1/2 tsp salt
2 ears fresh corn
1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved
1/2 cucumber, seeds removed and chopped
3/4 cup chopped chicken breast
fresh parsley
salt and pepper

Directions

Cook bulgur according to directions and add 1 Tbsp olive oil plus 1/2 tsp salt to cooking water. After bulgur is finished cooking (around 20 minutes) fluff with a fork and set aside.

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Remove corn kernals from the cob and spread out in a single layer on a lightly greased baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil, salt and pepper. Roast for 10-15 minutes, or until just starting to brown.

In a large bowl combine bulgur, roasted corn, cherry tomatoes, cucumber, chicken and 2-3 Tbsp chopped fresh parsley. Add salt and pepper to taste. Serve slightly warm or room temperature.

Posted on August 26, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Perfect Kale Chips

When I was pregnant with my daughter I discovered the wonder of kale chips. I was craving leafy greens, and making kale chips was a fun way to satisfy my urge. I would roast up 2 or 3 bags of kale at a time, and then stand shoveling it into my happy, pregnant mouth.

kale-chips-1

Fast forward, and I haven’t lost my taste for kale chips. And much to my delight, they are one of my daughter’s favorite snacks.

I want to be honest about the kale chip making endeavor: it can actually be a bit complicated. And whenever I mention kale chips among friends and family members, they always ask “how do you make yours? Mine always turn out soggy/burnt…”

kale-chips-2So here are my tips:

  • Make sure you spread kale out in a single layer. If the leaves overlap, they won’t crisp and cook properly.
  • Evenly coat the kale with olive oil. You can do this either by using a salad dressing mister, or simply massaging the kale before you bake it to make sure it is coated.
  • Start the kale at a lower temperature, and then raise it only at the end to get a good crisp – but don’t let them burn.
  • Watch the kale chips carefully at the end, and remove as they become done.

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Perfect Kale Chips

Ingredients

1 large head fresh kale
olive oil
salt and pepper

Directions

Preheat oven to 250 degrees.

Break kale into even pieces and spread out in a single layer on lightly greased baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil, salt and pepper.

Using your hands, massage kale to ensure olive oil coats leaves as evenly as possibly.

Bake for 20 minutes and turn leaves over on baking sheet. Raise the oven temperature to 375 degrees. Bake for another 5-10 minutes, removing pieces of kale as they look done.

Serve as a snack.

Posted on August 21, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Spinach Goat Cheese Tart with Herb Butter Crust

Yield:
6-8 servings

At least several times a year I am privy to a conversation about the downfalls of social media. And how no one talks to one another anymore. As someone who uses social media professionally, I generally disagree citing countless examples of how social media has allowed me to stay in touch with friends across the world; keep up with news in real-time; and learn new things.

foodie potluck food

And two weeks ago, on a beautiful summer evening, the wonders of social came together to allow myself and a group of kosher food bloggers to take the fun of our online personalities and meet one another, share a meal and talk food in person.

Cookbook author and teacher Kim Kushner hosted the lovely outdoor evening, called #kosherfoodiepotluck, where each one of us brought a kosher, dairy dish and a sat around a large, expertly decorated table to what else: eat and talk.

foodie potluck outside

There were so many delicious dishes (especially some homemade cronuts by Chef Chaya), but my favorite part was getting the chance to meet so many other bloggers that I have known and followed for years. Here’s me meeting Melinda Strauss of Kitchen Tested for the first time. I am a hugger, thankfully she didn’t seem to mind. And on the right is me with Liz Rueven of Kosher Like Me and Miriam Pascal of Overtime Cook.

foodie potluck people

You might be wondering, soooo….what did YOU make? I wanted to bring one of my husband’s favorite dishes, and I didn’t want to start creating a crazy new item for the first time. I also wanted to bring something that would transport easily, could use seasonal ingredients and could be served room temperature.

My goat cheese and spinach quiche with herb butter crust was just the thing. It’s also perfect for a Shabbat lunch, Sunday picnic or even Yom Kippur break-fast.Two notes about this recipe: first, it is inspired by my absolute favorite Julia Child, and resembles one of her recipes for an open-face tart. The second thing to note is that you can add any combination of fresh herbs that you like in the crust: sage, tarragon, mint or even cilantro. Get creative and enjoy.

spinach goat cheese tart

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Goat Cheese and Spinach Quiche with Herb Butter Crust

Ingredients

For the crust:
2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
1 tsp salt
1/4 tsp sugar
6 ounces chilled butter
4 Tbsp chilled vegetable shortening
a scant half cup ice water, or more as needed
1 Tbsp chopped fresh rosemary
1/2 Tbsp chopped fresh thyme
1/2 Tbsp chopped fresh oregano
1 Tbsp chopped fresh parsley

For the filling:
3 eggs
1 1/2 cups whipping cream
3 oz goat cheese, crumbled into pieces
2 shallots, minced
1 garlic clove, minced
1 Tbsp butter
1 Tbsp olive oil
1 1/4 cups blanched spinach, water squeezed out
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
1/4 tsp fresh nutmeg

Special equipment: springform pan

Directions

In a food processor fitted with a blade, add all crust ingredients except for water. Pulse a few times to mix. Begin adding water just until a ball of dough begins to form. Do not over-pulse.

Remove dough and work on a lightly floured surface until you can shape the dough into a flat disk. Wrap in plastic and place in fridge for 1-2 hours or overnight.

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.

Roll out crust on a lightly floured surface until 1/4 inch thick. Carefully roll the crust onto your rolling pin and lay on top of spring form pan. Gently push the crust into the pan using tips of fingers and thumbs. Prick the bottom of the crust with a fork all over, You can get fancy with the edges of the crust, or just leave for a rustic look. Bake for 7-9 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool slightly.

Reduce oven temperature to 375 degrees.

Whisk together eggs, cream, goat cheese, salt, pepper and nutmeg.

Heat a pan over medium heat and add butter and olive oil. Saute the shallots and garlic for just 2 minutes or until translucent. Add the spinach and stir for several minutes to remove any excess water. Remove from heat and allow to cool for 5 minutes.

Add spinach and shallot mixture to the egg mixture. Pour into prepared quiche crust.

Bake for 25-30 minutes. Serve warm or room temperature.

Posted on August 19, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Best of Summer Ice Pops

Even though Labor Day and Rosh Hashanah seem like they are just around the corner, summer isn’t quite over yet and so there are still plenty of cool treats to enjoy.

Forget ice cream – ice pops are definitely the new ‘it’ treat. Like ice cream, the flavor combinations are endless. But unlike ice cream, it’s much simpler to make a quality ice pop than to make ice cream with great flavor and the right consistency.

All you need is an ice pop mold, a great recipe and just a little patience. Try any one of these beautiful, delicious ice pop recipes and take your summer up a notch, that is, before it really is over.

iced coffee ice pops

Iced Coffee Ice Pops from Sheri Silver

Root Beer Float Pops from Sheri Silver

strawberru coconut pops

Strawberry Coconut Pops from Gluten-Flee

Homemade Fudge Pops from Brown Eyed Baker

halva-popsicles-8

Halva Popsicles from Molly Yeh

Watermelon Ice Pops from Jeanne Benedict

Strawberry Lemonade Greek Yogurt Pops from Naomi Sugar

pops-1

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Posted on August 14, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Summer Brunchin’

Yield:
4 servings

Summertime and brunch don’t always go together. Summer picnic. Summer cocktails. Summer barbecue. Yes, we hear those a lot. But a summer brunch can be truly delightful, especially when Shabbat ends so late on Saturday making it difficult to see friends over the weekend.

So skip expensive dinner Saturday night, and stay in for a light, and delicious summer brunch instead. With minimal cooking you can throw together a colorful and completely delightful meal for friends or family.

brunch-4

Now that peaches are in season it’s time to make your own bellinis. Last summer I used Ina Garten’s recipe and it was delightful and easy. And check out that gorgeous color. Pop open some prosecco and get sippin’.

Fluffy Lemon Blueberry Ricotta Scones from Food52 are also a perfect summer treat. Swing by your local farmer’s market for fresh blueberries to make this brunch sweet extra special. I like serving them with a homemade compound butter like Vanilla Bean Whipped Honey Butter, though any high quality, salted butter will do just fine.

scones

One of my summer favorites is a sweet and salty watermelon feta salad like this one from The Kitchn. And I don’t know anyone who ever complained about being served up a rich and creamy blintz souffle like this one from Nosher contributor Tamar Fox.

brunch-1

And last but not least, try my Tomato Caprese Salad with Roasted Corn as a fresh update on the Italian classic.

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Tomato Caprese Salad with Roasted Corn

Ingredients

2 ripe tomatoes on the vine

6 ounces fresh mozzarella

2 ears fresh corn

olive oil

salt and pepper

fresh basil

arugula or fresh spinach (optional)

Directions

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Remove corn kernals from cob by using a knife or a corn stripper.

Spread corn kernels in an even layer on a lightly greased baking sheet. Drizzle with 2 tsp olive oil and salt and pepper. Roast for 10-12 minutes. Remove from oven and allow to cool.

Slice tomatoes 1/4-1/2 inch thick. Slice mozzarella to same thickness.

Alternate layers of tomato and mozzarella. If desired place on top of a bed of arugula or fresh spinach leaves.

Spoon corn kernels on top of tomato and mozzarella. Drizzle with good quality olive oil, salt, pepper and fresh basil leaves.

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Posted on August 7, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Kosher Barbecue in the News

Tisha B’Av is over. The nine days have passed. Welcome back, meat!

Now’s is a good time to talk about how much kosher barbecue has been all over the news recently. It is summer after all. But even beyond that, it seems kosher barbecue is having a moment, and personally, I couldn’t be happier to see meat being elevated beyond hamburgers and hot dogs.  

kc bbq festival 2013

On August 17th the Kansas City Kosher Barbecue Festival will make it’s return. This festival is actually the only kosher barbecue festival officially sanctioned by the Kansas City BBQ Society. Who even know there was such a thing, but hey, go Kansas City. An addition to this year’s festivities? A panel of chefs and food critics that will publicly judge the entries including The Food Network’s Simon Majumdar, who is a judge on Cutthroat Kitchen, Iron Chef and Chopped. Fellow food blogger Yosef Silver is a proud committee member of the festival.

Speaking of festivals, Wandering Que, the barbecue pop-up, will be participating next week in the post Tisha b’Av Fleishfest. I think the fact that this is billed as a Guys’ Night out is pretty sexist, not to mention the ridiculous nature of the name ‘fleishfest’ but I will leave the remainder of my snarky commentary aside.

cholesterol

Another fellow food blogger Liz Rueven shared that she will be a guest judge in the first annual Southern New England BBQ Championship and Festival on September 7th. Dani Klein of YeahThatsKosher has a fuller list of kosher BBQ festivals so check it out to see if there’s one in your area.

milt

Just last week I saw that a new kosher food truck is hitting the streets of Chicago. Milt’s Barbecue for the Perplexed food truck will be making its debut the first week of August, featuring mostly sandwiches like brisket and pulled chicken. I do wonder how a food truck will fare in the colder, windier months of Chicago, but I suppose some barbecue might be just the thing to warm up a frigid Midwest day.

But no need to book a flight to Chicago. You can stay home and try our delicious kosher Korean BBQ on your own grill.

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Posted on August 6, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

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