Author Archives: Amy Kritzer

Amy Kritzer

About Amy Kritzer

Amy Kritzer is a food writer and recipe developer in Austin, TX who enjoys cooking, theme parties and cowboys. She challenges herself to put a spin on her Bubbe’s traditional Jewish recipes and blogs about her endeavors at What Jew Wanna Eat. Her recipes have been featured on Bon Appetit, Daily Candy, The Today Show Blog and more. You can follow her blog, http://whatjewwannaeat.com/.

Black & White Cookie Cheesecake

Yield:
1 9-inch cheesecake

There are two foods that are just quintessential New York City to me. Cheesecake, and black and white cookies. Well, and bagels. And pizza. Is coffee a food? But if we’re talking desserts, it’s cheesecake and black and whites all the way.

Black-and-White-Cheescake-1

I have been known to whip up some brownies on a whim or throw together a dozen cupcakes like it’s nobody’s business. But cheesecake is an all day affair. The long baking time and cooling does not match my impatient manner. Waiting until the next day to dive in? Fuhgettaboutit! So I usually only bake one for special occasions. Like Shavuot, a holiday where you are basically commanded to eat cheesecake. But this creation is a game changer. I’m going to need cheesecake a lot more often. Just in time for boat season.

Black-and-White-Cookie-5

I thought about simply decorating a cheesecake in black and white cookies, but I wanted more. I wanted the cheesecake to literally become a black and white cookie. So I started with a cakey crust in place of a traditional graham cracker one. Over that are layers of vanilla and chocolate cheesecake laced with lemon. On top? Oh icing, but of course. Instead of the classic one black and one white side, I made a crazy pattern. Because this is a crazy kind of cake. But you do what you like!

Black-and-White-Cookie-3

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Black and White Cookie Cheesecake

Ingredients

For the crust:

¼ cup granulated sugar

3 Tbsp unsalted butter, softened

1 large egg

½ cup whole milk

½ tsp vanilla extract

½ lemon, zested

½ cup cake flour

¼ tsp baking powder

Pinch of salt

 

For the cheesecake:

4 (8-ounce) packages of full-fat cream cheese

½ cup granulated sugar

1 cup sour cream

¾ cup milk

4 eggs

2 tsp vanilla extract

Zest from one lemon

1/4 cup all-purpose flour

1 4-ounce chocolate bar melted and cooled

 

For the icings:

1 1/2 cups confectioner’s sugar

1 ½ Tbsp corn syrup

2 tsp lemon juice

¼ tsp vanilla

1 Tbsp water

1/4 cup cocoa powder

Directions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F and position lower rack in the oven.

Prepare a 9-inch springform pan by greasing well with butter.  Wrap foil tightly around the outside of the pan to block water from the water bath from getting in. Make sure there are no holes.

To make the crust, mix sugar and butter together with a hand mixer until light and fluffy. About 2-3 minutes. Then add in the egg, whole milk, vanilla extract and lemon zest.

In a separate bowl, combine cake flour, baking powder and salt. Stir into wet ingredients until combined.

Spoon batter into the pan and bake for 15 minutes until just brown along the edges. Let cool in the pan while you make the cheesecake.

In a large bowl, use a hand mixer to whip cream cheese and sugar together until smooth. Then mix in sour cream and then milk. Then mix in eggs one at a time just until combined.

Stir in vanilla and lemon zest and then stir in flour until combined.

Pour half of the batter into the prepared pan over cooled crust, and then add cooled melted chocolate to the other half and incorporate. Pour remaining batter over the vanilla layer making sure batter should not reach the top of the pan.

Place the foil-wrapped pan in a large roasting pan with high sides. Pour boiling water until it reaches halfway up the cheesecake pan to make a water bath. Place on the lower rack and bake for 1 hour. You can also pour the boiling water in the pan after the cheesecake is set up in the oven in the roasting pan. Either way, don’t burn yourself!

Bake in preheated oven for 1 hour. Turn the oven off, and let cake cool in oven with the door closed for 5 hours to prevent cracking. Then chill in the refrigerator overnight, or at least 4 hours.

To make the icing, mix together confectioner’s sugar, corn syrup, lemon juice, vanilla and water.

Transfer half of the icing to another bowl and add cocoa powder. Add more water if needed to get desired consistency. Frost as desired and chill cheesecake in the refrigerator until ready to serve.

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Posted on May 19, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

White Wine Braised Chicken Thighs with Tomatoes and Potatoes

Prep:
10 minutes

Cook:
50 minutes

Yield:
4 servings

Though Passover can be an intimidating time to cook, (two Seders, no chametz, trying unsuccessfully to eat real food instead of just chocolate covered matzah) I love it. I thrive at updating traditions and the challenge of creating recipes so tasty, you’d actually want to eat them post-Passover.White-Wine-Braised-Chicken-Thighs-with-Leeks,-Potatoes-and-Tom-3Not surprisingly, I try to go where no cook has gone before (though maybe that’s for good reason). Manischewitz Ice Cream and Deep Fried Matzo Balls are some of the twists I’ve experimented with. When it comes to mains, I like to play around too. Sephardic seasoned salmon, tangy short ribs or brisket in a hearty mushroom sauce. I’m salivating just writing this. But the most requested type of main dish that I get? Chicken. Plain, boring chicken. Sigh. White-Wine-Braised-Chicken-Thighs-with-Leeks,-Potatoes-and-Tom-1I like to give the people what they want, but after tasting this version I’ll admit I was wrong! Chicken can be a wonderful dish when cooked well. This one-pot Passover meal has chicken thighs braised so tender in a white wine sauce you don’t even need a knife. Served with tomatoes, leeks and potatoes so it’s filling and healthy at the same time. That way, you can have more room for macaroons and chocolate-covered matzah.

White-Wine-Braised-Chicken-Thighs-with-Leeks,-Potatoes-and-Tom-4

White Wine Braised Chicken Thighs with Tomatoes and Potatoes

Ingredients

8 boneless, skinless chicken thighs (about 1 ½ pounds), washed, dried and trimmed

2 tsp salt, plus more to taste

1 tsp black pepper, plus more to taste

½ tsp smoked paprika

1/4 cup vegetable oil, divided

4 shallots, small diced

4 small carrots, cut into ¼ inch rounds

2 large leeks or 3 medium links, cut into ¼ inch rounds

2 cloves garlic, minced

3 cups white wine, such as Pinot Grigio

1 cup chicken broth

5 sprigs fresh thyme, tied with cheesecloth keep together

2 cups red potatoes, cut into quarters

1 cup grape tomatoes, halved

2 Tbsp fresh parsley, rough chopped

Directions

Season chicken liberally with salt, pepper and smoked paprika on both sides.

In a large Dutch oven or pot with a lid, head two tablespoons of oil over medium high heat. Add chicken in one layer and sauté until browned and not sticking to the pan. Flip and brown the other side, about 6-8 minutes total. Transfer to a plate.

Add 2 tablespoons oil to the pot, heat, and add shallots,carrots and leeks. Cook until browned, stirring regularly, about 6 minutes. Add garlic and sauté for 1 more minute.

Add wine, broth and thyme to the pot. Bring to a simmer while stirring and releasing the browned bits stuck to the bottom of the pot. Then add in chicken, potatoes and tomatoes. Bring back to a simmer, lower heat to medium low, and cover.

Braise until chicken is cooked and tender and potatoes are fork tender, about 40 minutes.

Remove chicken, potatoes and vegetables with a slotted spoon onto a platter. Cover with foil to keep hot. Remove thyme.

Bring sauce to a simmer and reduce for 7-10 minutes until the sauce coats the back of the spoon. Season with salt and pepper to taste if needed.

Pour sauce over chicken or serve on the side and garnish with parsley.

Posted on April 1, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Lox and Schmear Rangoon

Yield:
20

If Christmas is a time for tradition and family, then count me in! But I’m not talking about building gingerbread houses and trimming the tree. Our Jewish Christmas traditions were more about moo shu, a movie (ideally in the Home Alone series) and maybe a trip to the local casino. Usually, we’d pile in the car and head over to Cheng Du, one of the only restaurants open that day in town, and fill up on chicken & broccoli, vegetable dumplings and fortune cookies. And then an hour later when we were hungry again, finish the leftovers.

Lox-Rangoon-stamp

A few years ago, maybe turned off by the crowds or MSG, or inspired by my love of eating at home, I decided to start making my own Chinese food for Christmas instead. One bite of my homemade General Tso’s Chicken and I was hooked! This year, I took the decidedly unkosher Crab Rangoon and swapped the crab for lox. The result? Like a fried version of my favorite bagel breakfast. Why didn’t I think of this sooner? Now you can have lox and schmear for every meal. Christmas can’t come soon enough!Lox-and-Schmear-Rangoon-sta

Adapted from Rasa Malaysia.

Lox and Schmear Rangoon

Ingredients

8 ounces cream cheese (dairy or pareve), at room temperature

4 ounces lox, finely diced

1 Tbsp powdered sugar

1 Tbsp chives, minced

Pinch of salt

20 wonton wrappers

Canola oil, for deep frying

Directions

In a small bow, mix the cream cheese, lox, sugar, green onions and salt well.

Place about 1 heaping teaspoon of the cream cheese filling in the middle of a wonton wrapper.

Fold two pointy ends of the wonton wrapper together to make a triangle.

Fold the other two ends to make a tiny parcel. Using a little water, pinch to seal tight and make sure there is no leakage.

Heat up a heavy bottomed pot of 2-3 inches of oil to 350 degrees F and fry the rangoon in batches until golden brown, about 2 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on paper towels. Serve immediately.

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Posted on December 23, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Beet Chips with Spicy Honey Mayo

Prep:
20 minutes

Cook:
25 minutes


I’m kind of obsessed with beets. I’ve made Beet Fries, Pickled Beets and even Beet Hummus. Not only are they tasty and healthy, but a shade of vibrant pink (or golden yellow) that pops on your holiday table. Beets are rich in vitamin C, fiber, and some even consider them to be a natural aphrodisiac. Can’t hurt! Pass by the canned variety in favor of the more flavorful fresh. Totally versatile, beets are perfect roasted, pickled, raw or in this case, fried.

beet-chips-2-stampSprinkled with a little salt, these crunchy chips are delicious on their own, and even better when paired with a sweet and spicy pareve mayonnaise. Sort of a modern twist on apples dipped in honey. I used just red beets, but throw in some golden ones as well for a colorful addition to your Rosh Hashanah meal. The prayer said over beets in Hebrew means to remove, which signifies the hope that enemies and faults will be removed in the New Year.

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Amy Kritzer is a food writer and recipe developer in Austin, TX who enjoys cooking, theme parties and cowboys. She challenges herself to put a spin on her Bubbe’s traditional Jewish recipes and blogs about her endeavors at What Jew Wanna Eat. Her recipes have been featured on Bon Appetit, Daily Candy, The Today Show Blog and more. You can follow her on TwitterPinterest and Facebook and watch her cooking videos on Google+.

Beet Chips with Spicy Honey Mayo

Ingredients

For the beet chips:

1 quart vegetable oil

3 medium beets, washed and dried well

Sea salt

Coarse black pepper

For the spicy honey mayo:

¼ cup mayonnaise

3 tsp honey

2-3 tsp Sriracha (or to taste)

Directions

In a large, wide pot heat the oil over high heat to 375°F.

Cut the root end off the beets, and cut using a mandolin into 1/8-inch thick slices.

Set up a cooling rack over paper towels near the pot.

Once oil is hot, slip one layer of beets into the oil and fry until golden and the bubbling and sizzling stops, about 3-4 minutes.

Remove with a slotted spoon and immediately sprinkle with salt and pepper and let cool on the rack. The chips will crisp up as they cool.

To make the Spicy Honey Mayo, combine mayo, honey and sriracha in a small bowl. Chill for at least 10 minutes. Serve alongside freshly made beet chips.

Posted on August 19, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Honey Horseradish Chicken

Yield:
4 servings

honey horseradish chickenGrowing up, Passover meant sweet and sour brisket. Slowly braised in the oven for hours until Bubbe declared it was tender enough to eat. Sounds simple enough, but that poor brisket was in and out of the oven and examined and re-examined until it was dry. So we tried chicken one year. Surely that would fare better. But the story was the same- Bubbe, my Mom and Aunts gathered around the oven trying to determine if the chicken was done. Opening and closing the door, all whilst poking and prodding the poor bird. “Is it done?” “It looks done.” “No I see pink!” They were petrified of giving the whole family salmonella. Sigh.

Passover recipes are actually some of my favorite to develop- the limit in ingredients forces me to get creative and put together recipes that I never would otherwise. I decided to make a roasted chicken as homage to that Pesach- it would work for a seder, or you could nosh on it for meals during the chametz free week. Honey and mustard is one of my favorite combos, but of course mustard is out. How about horseradish instead as a nod to the seder meal? The horseradish gives the chicken a subtle spiciness much like a Dijon would, and is balanced with the sweet honey- delicious!

Honey Horseradish Chicken

Ingredients

1, 5-pound whole chicken, rinsed well and with innards removed

½ lemon

5 bulbs garlic

½ white onion

5 fresh rosemary springs

¼ cup kosher for Passover prepared horseradish

¼ cup kosher for Passover honey

¼ cup extra virgin olive oil

1 Tbsp salt

1 tsp ground black pepper

Parsley for garnish

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

Rinse the chicken under cold water and dry thoroughly with paper towels. Then put the chicken breast side up on a roasting rack in a roasting pan.

Stuff chicken with the lemon garlic, onion and rosemary sprigs.

In a small bowl, whisk together horseradish, honey, olive oil, salt and pepper. Spread all over the chicken, making sure to get under the skin as well.

Truss the chicken, or tuck the wings under the body and tie together the legs.

Roast chicken for 1 hour and 20 minutes, and then turn the oven up to 450 degrees F to brown the skin. Continue cooking about 20 more minutes until the internal temperature near the thighbone is 160 degrees F and the juices run clear (it should continue to cook once removed from the oven until the temperature is 165 degrees F).

Let chicken rest for 20 minutes covered with aluminum foil before carving. Garnish with parsley if desired.

Posted on March 13, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Neopolitan Hamantaschen

Yield:
30 cookies

Purim has always beenIMG_6397 one of my favorites out of the many, many Jewish holidays. Dressing up in fun costumes, masks, festive food and drinks. What’s not to love? One of my fondest memories growing up was attending out synagogue’s annual Purim Carnival. They went all out with games, face paint, and prizes all to celebrate Esther saving the Jews from Haman’s plans of extermination. Of course, as a young foodie, one of my favorite parts was the carnival themed food. While others went straight for the popcorn or cotton candy, I was all about the build your own ice cream sundae bar. Oh my. I piled on scoops of strawberry, vanilla and chocolate, rainbow sprinkles and a cherry or two.

Hamantaschen, the symbolic Purim cookie, are a great base for all sorts of flavors. I’ve made Chocolate Dipped Hamantaschen, Hamantaschen Tarts and even Caramelized Onion Hamantaschen. But when it came time to recreate a version this year, I reminisced about my favorite ice cream flavors and went with Neapolitan. A strawberry cookie filled with chocolate and drizzled with vanilla. Why should kids have all the fun?

Amy Kritzer is a food writer and recipe developer in Austin, TX who enjoys cooking, theme parties and cowboys. She challenges herself to put a spin on her grandmother’s traditional Jewish recipes and blogs about her endeavors at What Jew Wanna Eat. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook and watch her cooking videos on Google+.

 

Neopolitan Hamantaschen

Ingredients

¾ cup sugar

2 ¾ cups flour, sifted

2 tsp baking powder

¼ tsp salt

1 cup sliced strawberries

1 stick butter, room temperature

½ tsp vanilla

1 egg plus 1 for egg wash

Red food coloring if desired

Zest of 1 orange

1 cup chocolate nut butter, homemade or store bought

½ cup powdered sugar

few drops vanilla extract

Water

Directions

Combine the dry ingredients: sugar, flour, baking powder and salt in a bowl.

Meanwhile, puree strawberries in a food processer until blended.

Then add in the wet ingredients to the dry: butter, vanilla, 1 egg, pureed strawberries and orange zest and combine well with a mixer. If the dough is sticky, add a bit more flour. If it is dry add a bit of water. Form dough into a large ball and chill for at least one hour or up to overnight.

When you are ready to make your hamantaschen, preheat your oven to 350 degrees F and roll out the dough on a floured surface until it is 1/8 – 1/4 inch thick. Use a 3-inch circle cookie cutter to cut circles in the dough. The top of a wine glass works too! Roll out the scraps and recut into circles.

Then take a teaspoon of the nut butter and put it in the center of each circle. Don’t add any more- the filling will spread to fill the cookie, and anymore would just run over the top making for an ugly hamantaschen.

Fold two sides together overlapping at the bottom, and then fold the top down and secure.

Use the white of the last egg as an egg wash to give the hamantaschen shine and help it hold its shape. Then bake for 12-15 minutes until golden brown.

Allow cookies to cool.

Mix powdered sugar with vanilla extract and enough water to get a thick glaze. Drizzle over hamantaschen, let harden and enjoy!

Posted on February 11, 2013

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Coconut Latkes with Cranberry Applesauce & Cardamom Mascarpone

Yield:
10 latkes


coconut-latke1Just when I’m starting to recover from the gluttony fest known as Thanksgiving, bam! It’s already time for Hanukkah. Bring on the fried. Growing up, my Mom cooked both traditional and sweet potato latkes every year for my brother and me. We looked forward to these tasty fried treats almost as much as getting the latest Everclear CD or a new set of Pogs, hypothetically speaking of course.

I continue the tradition by cooking for our annual Chrismukkah gathering and showing my friends that latkes are way more than a Jewish hashbrown. Last year, I served up Mexican Potato Latkes, which were gobbled up faster than you can say “chag sameach.” This year, inspired by my leftover cranberries from Thanksgiving, I went with a slightly sweet approach. Coconut gives the latkes a subtle flavor and extra crunch, while the cranberry applesauce and cardamom mascarpone brings a tartness that lends itself to the perfect bite. Since I am not hopeful of having a white Hanukkah with the 80-degree weather we have be having in my home in Austin, TX, I garnished the plate with extra coconut to resemble snow. Wishful thinking, perhaps?

Amy Kritzer is a food writer and recipe developer in Austin, TX who enjoys cooking, theme parties and cowboys. She challenges herself to put a spin on her grandmother’s traditional Jewish recipes and blogs about her endeavors at What Jew Wanna Eat. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook and watch her cooking videos on Google+.

Coconut Latkes with Cranberry Applesauce & Cardamom Mascarpone

Ingredients

For Latkes:

2 cups (2/3 pound) russet potatoes, washed and peeled

1 cup unsweetened shredded coconut

2 eggs

2 Tbsps flour

2 Tbsps granulated sugar

½ tsp salt

½ cup canola oil

For Cranberry Applesauce

3 pounds apples (any apples you would use for baking, I used golden delicious), peeled and diced

2 cups fresh or frozen cranberries

2 Tbsps granulated sugar (up to 4 if you want it sweeter)

1 tsp ground cinnamon

½ tsp ground ginger

½ tsp ground all spice

Zest and juice from 1 orange

2/3 cup water (1/2 cup if using frozen cranberries)

1 Tbsp brandy (if desired)

For Cardamom Mascarpone:

¼ cup mascarpone

1 tsp cardamom (or more to taste)

Directions

To make the Coconut Latkes, start by shredding your potatoes with a grater.

Ring out all the moisture with a strainer and paper towel until all the moisture is gone and then add in the coconut, eggs, flour, sugar and salt and combine.

Meanwhile, heat up canola oil in a large sauté pan. Scoop two-tablespoon dollops of the potato mixture and flatten lightly and fry until golden brown, about 3-5 minutes. Then flip and fry the other side. Drain on a rack over paper towels.

To make Cranberry Applesauce, in a large saucepan, combine apples, cranberries, sugar, spices, orange juice and zest, water, and brandy if desired.

Bring to a boil and then lower to a simmer. Cover, and cook for 15 minutes until apples are tender and some of the cranberries have burst. Stir every so often, adding water if it gets too thick.

Remove from heat and let cool.  Blend with an immersion blender or smash with a fork.

To make Cardamom Mascarpone, combine cardamom and mascarpone in a bowl until blended.

Garnish latkes with applesauce and mascarpone!

Posted on December 3, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Bubbe’s Mushroom Challah Dressing

Yield:
10-12 servings


Thanksgiving isn’t a Jewish holiday, per say, but with the abundance of traditional foods and family, it may as well be! Favorite Thanksgiving foods can vary greatly by family (I recall getting in a heated brawl with my roommate over green bean casserole vs. Brussels sprouts one year. Brussels sprouts all the way!) But certain foods seem to find their way to every table, such as turkey, cranberry sauce, pie and of course stuffing.

Unfortunately, I won’t be making the schlep from Texas to Connecticut to have Thanksgiving with my family this year. Which means I will miss the yearly gathering of everyone around the oven, opening and closing the door repeatedly questioning whether the bird is done, all whilst prodding and probing at it for clues. Miss you guys!

In order to continue the tradition in my own home, I decided to recreated Bubbe’s famous Challah Dressing (since it is cooked outside the turkey it is technically a dressing, and not stuffing) with my own twists. I swapped out the onions for leeks, and added carrots and lots of fresh herbs. If you can’t find any of the fresh herbs, you can substitute dried as noted. Dried herbs are more intense, so make sure to use less. Delish! Definitely a holiday dish everyone can agree on.

 

Amy Kritzer is a food writer and recipe developer in Austin, TX who enjoys
cooking, theme parties and cowboys. She challenges herself to put a spin on her
grandmother’s traditional Jewish recipes and blogs about her endeavors at What
Jew Wanna Eat. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook and watch her
cooking videos on Google+.

Bubbe's Mushroom Challah Dressing

Ingredients

1 large loaf challah, cut into 1-inch cubes (about 8-10 cups, or enough to fill a
9x13 inch casserole dish)

4 Tbsp butter or margarine, plus more for greasing pan

1 cup carrots, diced

2 stalks leeks, cut into rounds

1 tsp kosher salt

2 cups celery, sliced

2 cups mushrooms (any kind), sliced

1 Tbsp fresh rosemary, minced (1/2 Tbsp dried)

1 Tbsp fresh thyme, minced (1/2 Tbsp dried)

1 tsp fresh sage, minced (1/2 tsp dried)

1 tsp fresh ginger, minced (1/2 tsp dried)

2 tsp fresh marjoram, minced (1 tsp dried)

1 tsp ground black pepper

2 eggs, beaten

3 cups chicken or vegetable stock

Fried sage leaves for garnish, if desired

Directions

Pre-heat oven to 300 degrees F. Spread challah cubes on a cookie sheet and
bake for 30 minutes or until dried out, tossing halfway.

Then increase oven to 325 degrees F.

Use butter or margarine to grease a 9x13 inch ceramic or glass casserole pan.

Melt remaining butter or margarine in a large sauté pan over medium heat. Add
in carrots, leeks and salt and sauté until vegetables start to soften.

Then add in celery, mushrooms and seasonings. Sauté until all vegetables are
slightly soft. Cool slightly.

Mix vegetables with challah bread.

Combine eggs with chicken stock and pour oven bread mixture until well
saturated (you may not need all of the liquid).

Bake at 325 degrees F covered in foil for 45 minutes, removing cover for the last
10 minutes.

Garnish with fried sage if desired.

Posted on November 15, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Pomegranate Brisket with Cranberry Succotash

Prep:
30 minutes

Cook:
3-3 1/2 hours

Yield:
4 servings



Rosh Hoshanah is one of my favorite Jewish holidays to cook for. Each year I look forward to the Fall smells, sense of renewal, traditions and of course eating lots of apples and honey. Now that I live in Texas, I sadly do not always get to spend the New Year with my family back east. But I do always take the opportunity to dream up a new version of my favorite main dish – brisket. In Texas, brisket is BBQ king.

Slowly smoked until it nearly falls apart and then smothered in a sweet and tangy sauce. I, of course, braise my brisket and enjoy feeding it to doubtful locals who are always won over by the tender meat and sweeter accompanying sauce. Plus, no special equipment besides an oven required!

I have wanted to try to create a pomegranate brisket for some time as a nod to the Rosh Hoshanah tradition to eat fruit that has just recently come into season. The pomegranate is often used for this purpose! Pomegranates are a little tricky to find in Texas, but the juice is plentiful and makes a perfect braising liquid. Served with pan juices and a crunchy, fresh succotash, this brisket is a new spin on an old favorite. If you have access to pomegranates, feel free to replace the dried cranberries with fresh pomegranate arils. This recipe can be doubled to feed a crowd, but remember the cooking time will be longer too.

Amy Kritzer is a food writer and recipe developer in Austin, TX who enjoys cooking, theme parties and cowboys. She challenges herself to put a spin on her grandmother’s traditional Jewish recipes and blogs about her endeavors at What Jew Wanna Eat. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook and watch her cooking videos on Google+.

Pomegranate Brisket with Cranberry Succotash

Ingredients

4-pound brisket
Salt and pepper
2 Tbsp grapeseed oil
2 medium white onions, chopped into large pieces
2 garlic cloves, minced
2 cups pomegranate juice
½ cup dry red wine
1-2 cups chicken broth
2 sprigs rosemary
2 springs thyme
2 ears corn, shucked and removed from the cob
1 cup dried cranberries (or fresh pomegranate arils)
2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil
2 tsp honey
2 tsp red wine vinegar
¼ cup cilantro, minced
Salt to taste

Directions

Preheat oven to 275 degrees F.

Season brisket on all sides with salt and pepper.

In a large Dutch oven or oven-safe pot, heat the grapeseed oil over medium-high heat and brown the brisket on all sides, or about 5 minutes per side.

Remove the brisket to rest, and add in onions and garlic. Sauté until browned, about 5 minutes.

Add brisket back in over the vegetables fat side down and cover with pomegranate juice, red wine, and enough chicken broth so the brisket is covered about ¾ of the way. Add in rosemary and thyme.

Cover the brisket and braise in the pre-heated oven for 3- 3.5 hours or until fork tender.

Once cooked, remove brisket to rest and heat pan juices over medium- high heat until reduced by at least half and sauce is thickened. Strain and add salt and pepper if needed.

In a bowl, combine corn and cranberries.

In a separate bowl, whisk together extra virgin olive oil, honey, and red wine vinegar. Toss with corn mixture and add in cilantro and salt to taste.

Once brisket has cooled, sliced against the grain and top with sauce and succotash. It is best reheated in a 200 degree F oven covered in its sauce to retain moisture. Enjoy!

Posted on September 5, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

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