Monthly Archives: January 2014

Pastrami Sandwich Challah

Yield:
1 large challah

When I was in high school, I had the most wonderful English teacher (that’s you, Mr. Scanlon!) who quoted Emerson, roughly, saying that we all contradict ourselves.

I often feel like I am the epitome of contradiction where eating and cooking is concerned. I strive to keep a mostly vegetarian diet, but sometimes I can’t help it. I relish making something fatty and delicious using red meat. And my Pastrami Sandwich Challah fits this bill precisely.

Pastrami Sandwich ChallahStuffing my challah with meat all began with my famous challah dogs (stay tuned for that recipe!). But recently I had a hankering to stuff my challah with something else. Ground beef? Seemed messy. Chicken? So dry. But then I thought of the North American classic deli roll—a dish I did not grow up with, and which I find both disgusting and delicious. And the idea for this crazy new challah began to take shape.

Pastrami Sandwich ChallahIf you have a local butcher as an option, please please please go get freshly sliced pastrami. Thin is best—a thick-cut pastrami will not result in the same consistency.

Make sure not to spread the Russian dressing on too thick, or you could end up with a leaky challah. I know that sounds delicious, but it might not make for such a pretty-looking challah.

Pastrami Sandwich ChallahLet us know if you try this. I’d love to hear modifications!

Pastrami Sandwich Challah

Posted on January 30, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Game Day Snacks Roundup

The Super Bowl is a week away, so the men in my life tell me. I am not much for subscribing to traditional gender roles, but I admit freely: I hate football. But I do love cooking up snacks for football-viewing especially spicy chicken wings and beef-stuffed knishes.

Looking for some kosher snack ideas for the football fans in your life? We have some great dairy, meat, pareve and gluten free ideas from our recipe archives and our favorite bloggers.

What will you be cooking up? Share below!

game day snacks

Roasted Garlic Hummus (pareve) 

Beet Chips with Spicy Honey Mayo (pareve)

beet-chips-1

Mediterranean Seven Layer Dip from The Shiksa (dairy)

Pesto Potato Pinwheels from The Overtime Cook (pareve)

Beef and Potato Puff Pastry Knishes (meat)

Spinach and Cheese Borekas (dairy) 

Pastrami on Rye Potstickers from What Jew Wanna Eat (meat)

Classic Hot Wings (meat)

Sweet and Spicy Asian Wings (meat)

Fried Pickles from The Food Yenta (dairy)

buckeye bites

Buckeye Bites from The Kosher Cave Girl (pareve)

Speculoos Chex Party Mix from Busy in Brooklyn (dairy)

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Posted on January 25, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Challah with a Chinese Twist

Love challah? Love Chinese food? You can’t believe the luck you’re in: Challah with a Chinese Twist!

scallion-challah-dough

Hold onto your challah covers, Noshers!

braided-scallion

Molly Yeh, a rocking young Chinese-American Jew and world-class baker just came up with an incredible recipe that celebrates her mixed heritage. And we’re so glad she did!

scallion-challah-9

Find her gloriously easy and delicious recipe here. “Inspired by the scallion pancake,” she writes.

We’re in food-love!

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Posted on January 22, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Cauliflower Tomato Bake with Basil and Parmesan

Hello Nosher readers! I’m so honored to have a recipe on this lovely site. I’ve been a long-time reader of MyJewishLearning.com so am extra honored to be featured.

Now, about this recipe. Lately, I’ve been on a mad “one-pot” meal frenzy.

tomatoes 2

I’ve got several full time jobs, including one with health insurance benefits and one with hugs-and-kisses benefits, both of which take up a lot of time. When it comes to cooking for Shabbat (or any meal), I try to keep it simple. This little side dish would be perfect with some grilled lemon salmon or any baked fish, really. And, if bread crumbs are omitted or almond flour is substituted, it’s grain-free and gluten-free friendly, which also means Passover-friendly. I hope you enjoy!

tomatoes 5

 

 

Cauliflower Tomato Bake with Basil and Parmesan

Posted on January 21, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Blogger Spotlight: Jewhungry

I have been following Whitney Fisch, aka Jewhungry, for the past 6 months on instagram, and eventually started reading her blog as well. I love her fresh, kosher recipes and the stories she shares about being a mom and a middle school counselor at a day school in Miami. So when she and I finally got to catch up on the phone last week I was absolutely thrilled. Read more below to hear how she got into cooking (hint: it all started in Jerusalem!) and about an exciting Passover cookbook she has in the works.

Make sure to check out Whitney’s scrumptious looking recipe on The Nosher tomorrow and read more on her blog Jewhungry.

wfish1

Why did you start blogging?

I started blogging about three years ago, initially with my friend Jeremy, mostly about cultural Jewish stuff and some food. I was working all the time and I really needed an outlet that allowed me some escape from my busy work life. It didn’t start as a food blog, and I actually took some time off from blogging all together while I was pregnant because the smell of all food made me nauseous.

After my pregnancy, Jeremy and I, though still very close friends, decided he would focus on other writing opportunities so I ended up taking over the blog, and it organically took on a new direction: parenting stories, stories about being a social worker and a counselor as well as stories about growing up in the South and living in Miami. And of course, I was writing about what I was cooking and eating.

Have you always loved cooking?

No not even a little bit!

I tried so hard to cook after college. And I had some tragic mishaps along the way. For example, when I was 22 I tried to make potato salad, but it didn’t dawn on me that I had to boil the potatoes first. I tried to serve it at a backyard picnic…well, it was not successful.

It wasn’t until I moved to Jerusalem and I was a stone throw’s away from the shuk that I started experimenting with cooking. It happened that I also met my future husband at that time and he let me use him as a guinea pig for my cooking. There was actually one time he made roasted potatoes with onion soup mix – how “Ashkenazi mom” of him – and I thought it was a culinary revelation. This shows you how much I was food illiterate.

It was through being in Jerusalem, having the time to cook in the evenings and being so close such amazing, fresh food that I really started cooking.

Has living in Miami influenced your cooking?

Absolutely! I am influenced both in terms of taste and visually. The colors that I choose, props I use on the blog – everything. I use lime and cilantro in at least half my dishes – those flavors are so prevalent here.

And the weather here really influences my cooking.  I am not making cholent, stews or heavy meats. It’s 85 degrees! So I want to eat fresh.

tomatoes

You didn’t always keep kosher. Is there anything you miss?

I wouldn’t say there is anything I miss per say. It is more about foods I am curious about that I have never eaten. For example, I want to try full-on French food. I read all of Julia Child’s books. And then I read all of Ruth Reichl’s books. So it’s more about what I am curious about eating more so that any single food that I miss.

What have you learned from blogging?

Early on I was advised by someone who told me I should write less, and I am glad I ignored that advice. I get amazing letters from people that read and really enjoy the stories I share.

So while I have continued writing, at some point I stopped doing complicated recipes and starting cooking more simple things, because that’s what I had time for and also those are popular with people. Sometimes people just want a good veggie chili recipe, etc.

What has been the best thing that has happened as a result of blogging?

Definitely the connections between people – the friends I have made online, especially with other bloggers. For example, I had a google hangout this morning with Amy Kritzer, Liz Rueven and The Patchke Princess talking about the Passover cookbook we are working on! I feel like we are supportive of one another, not competitive.

I have made so many friends through the internet and blogging including unexpected friends like The Rural Roost, who is neither kosher nor Jewish. But how exciting is it to connect with someone from Montana who I may not have ever met otherwise!

What advice do you have for someone else who wants to start a food blog?

Make sure you figure out your voice and where you want to go with blogging. Once you figure out your voice, you need to make sure you are connecting with other bloggers who share a similar focus as you. It helps build a community through like-minded bloggers.

What’s on the horizon for Jewhungry?

A lot!I am moving to Los Angeles where, among other things, I will be doing recipes and parent blogging for JkidLA. I am also working on a redesign for the blog and of course the Passover cookbook I mentioned.

wfisch2

Posted on January 20, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Quick Pickled Cucumber Salad

Yield:
4 servings

cucumber salad

A lot of my friends have fond memories of their grandmother’s chicken soup or their mom’s amazing brisket. Sadly, I don’t have these sacred food memories. My Jewish grandmother (who I love dearly) is not such a great cook. Her kugel is always dried-out, her soup is too fatty and still needs salt, and she serves jarred gefilte fish at holidays, which more closely resembles lint from a dryer than something edible.

But one of the dishes she makes that I do enjoy is her marinated cucumber salad. It’s a dish that she learned to make from her grandmother (my great-great grandmother) who lived most of her life in Russia.

I updated her recipe just a bit, using seedless English cucumbers instead of regular cucumber, and adding a bit of spice with just a pinch of red pepper. I also love serving my salad in mason jars – definitely a modern twist.

This quick salad is a cinch to whip up, keeps for several days in the fridge and is a real crowd-pleaser. My young daughter devours it, and even my father-in-law approves – truly the ultimate compliment.

Quick Pickled Cucumber Salad

Posted on January 15, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Mollie Katzen’s Grilled Bread and Kale Salad with Red Onions, Walnuts and Figs

Yield:
4 small salads or 2 large salads

Tu Bishvat is the perfect holiday for locavores, school kids and home cooks, alike. It’s a fruit-focsued holiday with plenty of room for creative cooking and connecting more deeply with the land as Spring approaches.

figs

School kids love the field trips to plant trees while home cooks and chefs dream up new ideas for integrating the seven edible species mentioned in the Torah:

wheat

barley

grapes

figs

pomegranates

olives

dates

When M. returned from a quick trip to visit his parents in Israel, he brought back a tightly wrapped disc of plump, moist figs in his backpack. I immediately turned to Mollie Katzen’s latest vegetarian book The Heart of the Plate for inspiration on how to integrate these beauties into a dish where figs would be the stars while I stay true to eating within the growing season here in the Northeast.

fig salad

This kale-based salad really hit the spot and was almost too beautiful to eat! Almost. Check out more from Mollie Katzen and her newest cookbook The Heart of the Plate!

Mollie Katzen's Grilled Bread and Kale Salad with Red Onions, Walnuts and Figs

Posted on January 13, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

9 Satisfying Soups

Yes, yes it’s COLD. We all got the memo. So instead of just kvetching about it, how about warming up with some homemade soup.

I love a hearty soup with a piece of crusty bread for lunch or paired along side a chopped salad for dinner. Soup is a great way to use leftovers, and also a great way to get in some extra veggies.

So while you’re bundled up avoiding the polar vortex, try your hand at one of these satisfying soups that is sure to make you forget that it’s actually -4 degrees outside.

soup collage

Hearty Lentil Soup from Liz Rueven

Roasted Eggplant and Chickpea Soup from Martha Stewart

Vegetarian Chicken Soup

Sweet & Spicy Sweet Potato Soup

Parsnip Pear Soup from The Food Yenta

Creamy Roasted Beet Soup

Egg Drop Matzo Ball Soup from What Jew Wanna Eat

Cumin Spiced Tomato Soup with Wild Rice from Aviv Harkov

Crockpot Mushroom Barley Soup from Busy in Brooklyn

mushroom-barley-stoup

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Posted on January 8, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Penne with Broccoli, Ricotta & Chickpeas

Weekday dinnertime, sigh. You’re tired, you’re hungry and you just want to sit down with a glass of wine and unwind from the day.

Sound familiar?

Before you reach for those takeout menus, you may want to rummage around in your fridge to see what ingredients you have on hand that can easily be thrown together. That’s exactly what I did last week while looking for something quick, easy (but delicious) to have for dinner after a long day at work.

SONY DSC

Because you cook the broccoli with the pasta, this pasta dish is really a cinch to whip up, even on those nights when cooking is the last thing you want to do. No chickpeas? You could replace them with cannellini beans. Extra chicken lying around? Leave out the ricotta and add in some grilled chicken pieces instead.

SONY DSC

The lemon zest in this dish goes a long way, packing a strong punch of flavor with such a small step. Do you have a lemon zester as part of your kitchen arsenal? If not make sure to get one immediately! I have one on hand all the time, and even have a separate one for Passover. Here’s the one I love using.

Penne with Broccoli, Ricotta & Chickpeas

Posted on January 6, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Chopped Kale Salad with Apple and Roasted Beets

Yield:
4 servings

Okay everyone, it’s a new year, and so it’s time for a new salad!

chopped kale salad with roasted beets

Kale is everywhere, and I must admit – I long ago hopped onto the kale train. I love making roasted kale as a salty, crispy snack. When I was pregnant with my daughter, I would make my way through three entire bags of kale in a single week. I just love kale and I know I am not the only one. There’s even a cookbook called Fifty Shades of Kale dedicated to the leafy green!

Recently I’ve had a few different kinds of salad using raw kale as the base, instead of spinach or other mixed greens. It was hearty and really satisfying, so I decided I would move on from roasting or sauteing the kale, and go right for a chopped kale salad.

close up kale salad

You can dress this salad up to your liking by adding some chopped cucumber, red onion or some feta cheese. Want to make this this salad into a full meal? Add grilled chicken on top for a hearty lunch or dinner.

Chopped Kale Salad with Apple and Roasted Beets

Posted on January 2, 2014

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy