Monthly Archives: September 2012

Amy’s “Bissel” Apple Cake

Cook:
60-80 minutes

Yield:
1 9" cake



This cake falls into the “bissel” category for a few reasons: first, it is one of those recipes that is more about look and feel than it is about exactness; and secondly, expanding on the first point, it’s also one of those recipes that allows for a lot of tweaking– a pinch of that, a variation of that, a bissel of orange this time, let’s say– and it always just works.

It also keeps nicely, is a perfectly hospitable option for gluten-free guests (see the flour options part), and it doesn’t take a ton of effort to make it look “wow.”

Let’s do this:

In addition to the ingredients below, you’re also going to need 3-4 Granny Smith apples.

I know, I know, you’re thinking, “Granny Smiths are so tart! I like such-and-such.” Yes. I know. but, for baking, Granny Smiths are sturdy so they don’t turn to a lump of mush and they sweeten up as you cook ‘em.

Amy's "Bissel" Apple cake

Posted on September 11, 2012

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Gluten-Free Apple Kugel


gf-apple-kugel-eletterI love apple kugel, and have come to realize that making kugels gluten-free is actually really simple if you have the right ingredients. I keep an all-purpose gluten-free flour on hand that has xanthan gum already included in it (brands like Bob’s Red Mill and Better Batter). Buy yours online and in bulk for the best prices.

Gluten-Free Apple Kugel

Posted on September 10, 2012

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Crockpot Sweet and Sour Brisket



Growing up Rosh Hashanah always meant a trip to grandma’s house. Ten kids running around, 8 adults, games, music, naps on the living room floor after temple and of course a whole lot of food.

Grandma always had a spread. Matzo ball soup, brisket, chicken, kasha, roasted vegetables, salads, potatoes. Every year grandma out did herself. Her meals evolved and as the ten of us got older, there seemed to be more and more food (and no leftovers the following day).

crockpot brisket

As we all got older, got married, moved, had lots of kids, joined different temples, our traditions changed. Grandma now comes to our houses. For a change, we finally get to feed her and she gets to sit back and enjoy as we did when we were children.

Figuring out how grandma made her brisket was always a challenge. If you have ever seen the show “Everyone Loves Raymond” you kind of get the idea of where this is going. She might have given you the recipe but it never tastes the same. I tried for years. Maybe it was the love she put into it, maybe she left out an ingredient, I will never know, but now it was up to me to figure it out.

One of my favorite things about cooking now for the holidays is I get to take all these traditional foods that grandma once made and put a nice modern twist on it. Her chicken liver that made all the kids cringe, now we make it vegetarian and it’s gone within seconds, the potatoes that were smothered in mushrooms and onions, now are plain and simple. The brisket that she made, you know the one that sat in the oven all day, now is made in a crock pot. I still cook with the love, but with a modern twist, easy, simple, throw together in the morning and come home from temple and serve.

Crockpot Sweet and Sour Brisket

Posted on September 10, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Apple & Calvados Chicken Liver Pate



A universal symbol of love, health and wisdom, the apple is especially prominent at Rosh Hashanah. What exactly is it about the apple that makes it key to a sweet New Year?

One answer might be found in Song of Songs 8:5 which begins with “Beneath the apple tree I aroused you.” Symbolically alluding to the love relationship between G-d and the Jewish people, this poem has been interpreted to suggest that the apples we eat at Rosh Hashana, which remind us of that special relationship with G-d, are what give us the strength to repent and improve ourselves.

Conversely, it could be argued that apples feature prominently at Rosh Hashana simply because the time of year coincides with the bounty of the apple harvest.

Regardless of why we eat them, apples are a delicious and nutritious addition to the holiday kitchen. With more than 7,500 varieties worldwide, their crisp exterior and juicy interior provide infinite options for apple-focused dishes.

This Rosh Hashana, I hope you’ll try my Apple & Calvados Chicken Liver Pate. A more elegant spin on the familiar Chopped Liver, this dish highlights the mystique of the apple by adding complementary layers of flavor that balance the apple’s sweetness and acidity.

Enjoy this recipe. And more importantly, remember to enjoy this time for evaluation, self-renewal and, ultimately, sweet transformation.

 

Food aficionado and graduate of Le Cordon Bleu, Joy Dawn Prevor is the creator of MyCulinaryJoy.com, an interactive learning experience focused on ingredients and techniques that empower food-lovers to make their own recipes. Joy’s culinary repertoire includes Cooking Classes, Freelance Writing, Specialty Catering, Recipe Development, Culinary Demos and National Food & Wine Events. Please visit her at My Culinary Joy.

Apple & Calvados Chicken Liver Pate

Posted on September 9, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Shabbat Recipe Roundup

The High Holidays quickly approach, and with it, lots of cooking! The last thing you probably want to be doing as you gear up for family-filled dinners is more cooking…but alas, its time for Shabbat!

This week I put together some easy, simple recipes that won’t have you slaving over a hot stove for too long.

Fruit still abounds, so why not start your meal with this refreshing Fruity Salad with Raspberry Zinger from The Overtime Cook.

I love a good, simple roasted chicken recipe. Put it together, throw it into the oven, and 45 minutes to an hour later you have a perfect, juicy main attraction. Try The Shiksa‘s recipe this week for Honey Herb Roasted Chicken.

What does lemon plus oregano plus potatoes equal? Potato side dish perfection! Try this Martha recipe for Greek Lemon Roasted Potatoes to go alongside that beautiful herb roasted chicken.

And what could be quicker or easier than this Quick and Easy Chocolate Cake. Serve with some fresh berries, and maybe even some soy ice cream!

Happy cooking and Shabbat Shalom!

 

 

Posted on September 7, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Vegan Honey Cake



Vegan Honey Cake

Posted on September 6, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Pomegranate Brisket with Cranberry Succotash

Prep:
30 minutes

Cook:
3-3 1/2 hours

Yield:
4 servings



Rosh Hoshanah is one of my favorite Jewish holidays to cook for. Each year I look forward to the Fall smells, sense of renewal, traditions and of course eating lots of apples and honey. Now that I live in Texas, I sadly do not always get to spend the New Year with my family back east. But I do always take the opportunity to dream up a new version of my favorite main dish – brisket. In Texas, brisket is BBQ king.

Slowly smoked until it nearly falls apart and then smothered in a sweet and tangy sauce. I, of course, braise my brisket and enjoy feeding it to doubtful locals who are always won over by the tender meat and sweeter accompanying sauce. Plus, no special equipment besides an oven required!

I have wanted to try to create a pomegranate brisket for some time as a nod to the Rosh Hoshanah tradition to eat fruit that has just recently come into season. The pomegranate is often used for this purpose! Pomegranates are a little tricky to find in Texas, but the juice is plentiful and makes a perfect braising liquid. Served with pan juices and a crunchy, fresh succotash, this brisket is a new spin on an old favorite. If you have access to pomegranates, feel free to replace the dried cranberries with fresh pomegranate arils. This recipe can be doubled to feed a crowd, but remember the cooking time will be longer too.

Amy Kritzer is a food writer and recipe developer in Austin, TX who enjoys cooking, theme parties and cowboys. She challenges herself to put a spin on her grandmother’s traditional Jewish recipes and blogs about her endeavors at What Jew Wanna Eat. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook and watch her cooking videos on Google+.

Pomegranate Brisket with Cranberry Succotash

Posted on September 5, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Bye Summer, Hello Holidays!

Summer is officially over and there is no rest for the weary because the High Holidays are right around the corner. Rosh Hoshanah, the Jewish New Year, begins on Sunday night September 16th and here at The Nosher we’ve been preparing for weeks already!

Stay tuned later this week – we have some fantastic brisket, kugel and apple cake recipes perfect for your family dinners as well as complete Rosh Hoshanah dinner menus to help take the pressure off of planning.

And don’t forget to enter our “Best Brisket Recipe Contest” – the deadline to send us your favorite recipe is tomorrow!

Happy High Holiday planning!

Posted on September 4, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy