Monthly Archives: September 2012

Cookbook Review: One Egg is a Fortune

As I have written about before, I love good cookbooks (not all cookbooks), so when a cookbook comes across my desk I am skeptical until proven otherwise.

I recently came across a copy of One Egg is a Fortune, a beautiful (very large) cookbook with recipes compiled by Pnina Jacobson and Judy Kempler. It’s sort of a Stars of David in cookbook form, with recipes and stories from famous Jews from around the world.

One Egg is a Fortune serves as an informative and captivating history of Jewish food traditions from around the world.  And if the stories don’t grab your attention the mouth-watering photos will. The bold photography seems to tell two kinds of stories – the stories of the food itself and the story of the food’s journey. New Yorkers will love the obvious reference to its beloved Fairway supermarket on the Upper West Side, the famous Katz’s deli on the Lower East Side and familiar sight of street pretzels while Jerusalem lovers will immediately be drawn into the sounds and smells of its famous marketplace.

While readers might initially get excited to peruse recipes from famous Jews such as chocolatier Max Brenner, Rabbi Shmuley Boteach and Marlee Matlin, the recipes from some of the lesser-knowns are just as satisfying including Sam Lipski’s Aromatic Roast Brisket and Alan Gold’s Hungarian Scalloped Potatoes.

I personally prefer a straightforward cookbook without the fancy photos (as beautiful as they are) and family stories, but for those of who love more than just the recipes, this is definitely the book for you!

 

Posted on September 28, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Sweet ‘n Spicy Sweet Potato Soup

Yield:
6-8 servings


This is one of my favorite recipes to make and to share with others. Every time I make this soup people ask for the recipe and simply cannot believe it’s pareve – its so rich and creamy!

Of course you can make it dairy and serve it with creme fraiche.

What a great soup to sip in the Sukkah or on any breezy Autumn day!

Sweet n Spicy Sweet Potato Soup

Ingredients

10 medium sweet potatoes
3 Tbsp olive oil plus extra
1 medium onion, diced
2 carrots, diced
2 quarts chicken or vegetable stock
1 14 oz can coconut milk
1/4 cup brown sugar
1 tsp cayenne pepper
1 tsp paprika
2 tsp coarse sea salt
2-3 dried chili peppers (small; if using medium sized dried chilis, just use one)

crème fraîche (optional)

olive oil for finishing (optional)

candied pecans or walnuts (optional)

Directions

Pre-heat oven to 400 degrees.

Mix brown sugar, cayenne pepper, paprika and salt in a small bowl. Cut sweet potatoes in half and place on foil-lined baking sheet. Spread brown sugar spice mixture all over sweet potatoes and drizzle with olive oil. Roast sweet potatoes for 35-45 minutes or until completely soft. Set aside and let cool.

In a medium to large pot, heat 3 Tbsp olive oil and sauté onions and carrots until translucent and soft, around 4-6 minutes. Add 2-3 cups of stock and simmer for 5 minutes. Add sweet potato flesh and using an immersion blender, blend all vegetables until smooth. Add remaining stock and dried chilis.

When the soup is heated through and flavors have blended, around 20-30 minutes, add coconut milk. Remove the dried chilis before serving.  Note: the longer you let the chilis sit in the soup, the spicier the soup will be.

If you are making this soup dairy, you can serve with a dollop of crème fraîche or sour cream. If you are serving this soup pareve, drizzle with good quality olive oil and some chopped candied pecans or walnuts.

Posted on September 25, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Break-the-Fast Menu

What’s the best part of fasting on Yom Kippur? Well, BREAK-ing the fast of course! Most American Ashkenazi Jews I know break the fast with bagels, lox, cream cheese, orange juice and other treats, such as cucumber salad or noodle kugel.

I also like changing things up and making a spinach quiche and cheesecake! Here are a few ideas for your break-fast from our favorite recipes.

Wishing everyone a sweet new year, an easy fast and a meaningful holiday!

Break-the-Fast Menu

Homemade Bagels

Custom Cream Cheese

Cheese Lokshen (Noodle) Kugel

Israeli Salad

Cucumber Salad from The Food Yenta

Lavender Cheesecake with Shortbread Almond Crust

Tamar’s Coffee Cake

Chef Paula Shoyer’s Pumpkin Bread

 

 

Posted on September 24, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Custom Cream Cheese

Yield:
12-14 servings


Everyone loves a good bagel spread for most occasions, but especially to break the fast at the end of Yom Kippur. I love putting together a platter of thinly sliced red onions, capers, cucumbers and tomatoes to top my glorious bagel.

But what if you want to do something a little different for your break-fast!? How about making some custom cream cheese flavors!

I am partial to savory cream cheese flavors such as this Herbed Cream Cheese from Tyler Florence or this Vegetable Cream Cheese from Ina Garten. But you could also go a sweeter route with this Cinnamon Raisin and Toasted Nut Cream Cheese.

You can even add a few teaspoons of your favorite jam for a fruity cream cheese spread. Top with fresh fruit for a complete sweet bagel treat!

Or you can go a little wild and try my recipe for Chipotle Cream Cheese. Feel free to add more or less chipotle depending on your tastes.

 

Chipotle Cream Cheese

Ingredients

2 8 ounce packages of cream cheese, at room temperature

1-2 Tbsp chipotle in adobe (depending on your tastes), minced

1 tsp salt

1/2 tsp white pepper

1/2 tsp garlic powder

Directions

In a mixing bowl, combine minced chipotle and liquid, salt, pepper and garlic powder. Add softened cream cheese and mix until combined thoroughly. Serve with fresh bagels and sliced avocado.

Posted on September 20, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Brisket Contest Winner!

Yield:
12-16 servings



After reviewing dozens of brisket recipes, I still can’t believe how many variations of the same dish will grace Jewish families’ dinner tables on Sunday night to celebrate the Jewish New Year.

It was really hard to choose, but we are excited to share with you Maureen Sharon’s  Brisket with Tsimmis recipe. Maureen shared that it is her family’ absolute favorite, and perhaps it will become your family’s new favorite too!

We hope you enjoy this special family recipe and enjoy whatever meals you share with loved ones next week. Happy cooking – Happy New Year!

Maureen Sharon's Brisket with Tsimmis

Ingredients

1 6 pound brisket

1 Tbsp crushed garlic

1 tsp salt

1 tsp pepper

½ tsp paprika

½ tsp thyme

4 large Onions, sliced into rings

6 stalks celery, sliced

1 lb carrots, sliced (or use whole baby carrots)

12 oz can of tomatoes, stewed or plain

1 cup brewed extra strong coffee

½ cup sweet kosher wine such as Manischewitz

1-2 packages of dried fruit assortment (plums, apricots, etc.)

1-2 lbs small whole yukon gold or red potatoes

2 large yams, cut into chunks

½ cup balsamic vinegar (optional)

½ cup honey (optional)

Directions

Rinse and dry the meat and trim fat to your liking. Rub with crushed garlic, salt and pepper to taste. Preheat oven to 300 degrees.

Cover the bottom of your roasting pan (I often use a large disposable aluminum baking pan) with about 2/3 of the sliced onions, celery, and some of the carrots. Arrange the brisket on top, and scatter remaining onions, celery, carrots and spices/herbs on top. Add half of the dried fruit and all the tomatoes. Pour in the coffee and wine. Cover pan with lid or with heavy duty foil and make sure you have a tight seal.

After 2 ½ hours check for doneness with a fork. If the fork goes in fairly easily, you can remove the meat, let rest for 20 minutes, then slice the brisket against the grain. This is a good dish to make ahead of time. You can either refrigerate overnight or freeze. Store the brisket and sauce/vegetables and fruit (tsimmis) separately. Defrost thoroughly before completing the dish.

Return the sliced brisket to the pan. Add potatoes, yams, the other half of the dried fruit, and more sliced celery and carrots. Recover the pan and cook for at least another hour or two until potatoes are tender.

The vegetables and fruit can be served separately as a tsimmis side dish. You can keep the brisket in a low oven (200° F) for several hours to keep warm.

If you like sweet/sour flavors, add ½ cup Balsamic vinegar before cooking and ½ cup honey during the final reheating stage. Be sure to taste and adjust seasoning, adding more honey or vinegar to taste.

Brisket tends to shrink a good deal while cooking, so figure 2-3 servings per pound.
Rinse and dry the meat and trim as much fat as you like. Rub with garlic salt or crushed
garlic, salt and pepper to taste. Preheat oven to 300° F. 

Cover the bottom of your roasting pan (I often use a large disposable aluminum baking
pan) with about 2/3 of the sliced onions, celery, and some of the carrots. Arrange the
brisket on top, and scatter remaining onions, celery, carrots and spices/herbs on top. Add
some of the dried fruit and the tomatoes. Pour in the coffee and wine. Cover pan with lid
or with heavy duty foil. You want a tight seal. After 2 ½ hours check for doneness with
a fork. If the fork goes in fairly easily, you can remove the meat, let rest for 20 minutes,
then slice the brisket against the grain. This is a good dish to make ahead of time. You
can either refrigerate overnight or freeze. Store the brisket and sauce/vegetables and fruit
(tsimmis) separately. Defrost thoroughly before completing the dish.

Return the sliced brisket to the pan. This is the time to add potatoes, yams, the rest of
the dried fruit, and more sliced celery and carrots. Recover the pan and cook for at least
another hour or two until potatoes are tender. The meat is delicious with the sauce. The
vegetables and fruit can be served separately as a wonderful tsimmis. You can keep the
brisket in a low oven (200° F) for hours. Since it’s already sliced, it is easy to serve. It
tastes even better the next day. Enjoy.

If you like sweet/sour flavors, add ½ cup Balsamic vinegar before cooking and ½ cup
honey during the final reheating stage. Be sure to taste and adjust seasoning, adding
more honey or vinegar as desired.

Posted on September 13, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Rosh Hashanah Dinner Menus!

Doesn’t it seem like you were just planning your Labor Day grilling menu, and now here we are planning for the High Holidays!? If you’re finding yourself scrambling to put together your meals, or maybe you just want some new recipes ideas, we’ve made the planning for this year easy with two different mix-and-match Rosh Hashanah dinner menus.

Happy cooking and l’shanah tovah!

MENU 1 – TRADITION!

Gefilte Fish

Chicken Soup

Tzimmes

Yerushalmi Noodle Kugel

Crockpot Sweet and Sour Brisket

Apple Cake with Honey

Applesauce Souffle Bread Pudding

 

MENU 2 – JEWISH WITH A TWIST

Apples and Calvados Chopped Liver

Roasted Beet and Leek Risotto

Green Beans with Honey Tahini Glaze

Sweet Potato Kugel

Pomegranate Brisket

Amy’s “Bissel” Apple Cake

Posted on September 12, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Apple Cake with Honey

Yield:
10 servings



Apple Cake with Honey

Ingredients

1/4 cup plus 1 Tbsp sugar
1 tsp ground cinnamon
2 eggs
1/4 cup honey
1/2 cup vegetable oil
2 teaspoons lemon rind (fresh or dried)
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 1/4 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
2 Tbsp lemon juice
2 Tbsp water
2 large apples (preferably Golden Delicious or Gala), peeled, cored and sliced paper thin

Directions

Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees.  Lightly grease a tube pan (like you
would use for an angelfood cake), then flour the pan slightly.  Mix 1
tablespoon sugar with the cinnamon in a small bowl and set aside.

Beat eggs with 3/4 cup sugar in a large bowl with an electric
mixture on medium speed.  Add honey, oil, and lemon rind and beat to
blend.  In a separate bowl, sift flour, baking powder, baking soda and
salt.  Add about half the flour mixture to egg batter and blend
together at low speed.  Add in lemon juice and water to batter.
Slowly blend in remaining flour mixture and blend on low speed.

Spoon 1/4 of the batter into the tube pan and spread evenly.
Layer 1/3 of the apple slices on top of the batter and sprinkle with
the cinnamon sugar mixture.  Continue with batter/apple/cinnamon sugar
batter until you finish with a layer of batter.  Don't worry if the
top layer of apples isn't completely covered.

Bake 40-45 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the cake
comes out clean.  Cool the cake in the pan, and once cooled, pop the
pan bottom up and gently transfer to serving plate.

Serve at room temperature and enjoy!

Posted on September 12, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

The Power of Jewish Food

MyJewishLearning’s recipes connect people across generations. When Brenda encountered our recipe for Plumkuchen, or plum cake, she relayed an amazing story: “The woman who taught me this recipe was a survivor of Auschwitz and told me that every Rosh Hashanah her mother, who perished in the Holocaust, would make this cake from their family’s plum tree. I have since baked this cake every New Year in her memory and for those who have no one to remember them.”

We’re particularly proud when MyJewishLearning’s recipes help people revive family traditions, as was the case with Beatrice, when she discovered our recipe for meat kreplach. “You seem to have been in my mother’s kitchen. The picture and the description of how to make it reminded me of her doing exactly that on the kitchen table when I was a child. I think I’m going to make them for the first time in my life.”

MyJewishLearning is a non-profit organization that depends on donations from people like you to cover 85% of its operating budget. For the last 10 years, MyJewishLearning has helped people like Brenda and Beatrice find Jewish recipes and connect with Jewish life. Help make sure MyJewishLearning is here for the next 10 years by making a tax-deductible donation today.

Posted on September 11, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Roasted Beet and Leek Risotto

Yield:
4 servings



beet risotto

Roasted Beet and Leek Risotto

Ingredients

1 cup arborio rice

2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil

½ large Spanish onion peeled and minced

The white bottoms of 2 cleaned leeks, minced

1 medium red beet, skin off and diced

½ cup dry white wine

2 cup chicken or vegetable stock

½ cup beet juice

1 tsp herbs de provence

¼ cup pareve tofu cream cheese (optional)

1 Tbsp margarine (optional)

Directions

In a heavy skillet, heat the olive oil. Sautee the onions and leeks until soft and translucent. Add the beets and continue to stir.

Add your rice and coat evenly with the oil.

Over low heat, slowly toast the rice in the oil and vegetable mixture. Deglaze with the white stirring constantly. While stirring allow the wine to fully absorb into the rice mixture.

Continue to repeat with the stock, adding the liquid in at least 3 parts constantly stirring.  Add the beet juice stirring vigorously.

Take off the heat and stir in the tofutti cream cheese and margarine, add the herbs de province.

1 cup arborio rice

2 Tbsp extra virgin olive oil

½ large Spanish onion peeled and minced

The white bottoms of 2 cleaned leeks, minced

1 medium red beet, skin off and diced

½ cup dry white wine

2 cup chicken or vegetable stock

½ cup beet juice

1 tsp herbs de province

¼ cup pareve tofu cream cheese (optional)

1 Tbsp margarine (optional)

Posted on September 11, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Apple Sauce Soufflé Bread Pudding

Yield:
8 servings



Olga Massov is The Sassy Radish, a food writer and a home cook. Her first cookbook, The Kimchi Cookbook, will be published November 27, 2012 and is available for pre-order. She is at work on her second cookbook, which will be out in 2013.

Applesauce Soufflé Bread Pudding

Ingredients

1 cup whole milk
1 cup heavy cream
9 ounces (8 cups) challah cubes, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
8 Tbsp unsalted butter
1/4 cup light brown sugar, packed
1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
1/4 tsp ground nutmeg
Pinch of cloves
Pinch of allspice
4 large egg yolks
1 cup unsweetened applesauce, room temperature
2 large egg whites
1 Tbsp granulated sugar, plus additional for dusting the dish
1/2 tsp kosher salt

Directions

Heat oven to 375 degrees and position the rack in the middle. In a small saucepan set over low heat, bring the milk and the cream to a simmer. Place challah cubes in a bowl. Remove milk-cream mixture from heat and pour half of the liquid over the challah. Let sit.

In a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment set on high speed, cream the butter and the brown sugar until light and fluffy (start the mixer on low and gradually increase to high speed). Add the egg yolks, cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, and allspice, beating well, on medium high, until emulsified. Add apple sauce and the remaining dairy mixture, and mix until thoroughly combined.

Fold the soaked challah into the apple sauce mixture. Place the egg whites in a clean, dry bowl and add the sugar and the salt. Starting with the mixer on low and gradually increasing the speed to high, beat until the egg whites form stiff peaks.

Gently fold the whites into the batter. Butter and sugar a 3-quart soufflé dish or 8 3 1/2-inch ramekins, then place or evenly divide the batter. If baking in a soufflé dish bake the pudding about 1 hour and 30 minutes or until a knife, inserted into the pudding, comes out clean.

Check on your bread pudding after 1 hour.  If the top of your bread pudding starts to get too brown, cover it with tin foil and continue to cook.) If using the ramekins, bake the pudding for about 25 minutes, or until a knife, inserted into the pudding, comes out clean. Baked puddings can be wrapped and kept in the refrigerator for up to 3 days, then heated in the oven wrapped in foil or microwaved until warm.

Posted on September 11, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

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