Fit to Eat

There has been a lot of talk about kashrut lately. And while some of it has been related to foods actually being certified kosher, a lot of it is simply about whether food is or isn’t fit for consumption.

There’s still a lot of talk lingering from the big news that New York’s Mayor Bloomberg, ever on an anti-obesity crusade, wants to ban supersized soft drinks in the city, meaning drinks that are more than 16 ounces. One of the key arguments–beyond the health implications of these drinks–is that it’s really hard to tell just how much you are consuming and that’s completely intentional. (I recommend the accompanying quiz to prove it.) In other words, New York’s near future may involve a world in which soft drinks are no longer “kosher.”

On Monday, fish markets and grocery stores were selling something new (sort of). For the first time since the March 2011 tsunami that turned into a nuclear disaster, fish caught in the region were available for purchase–in this case octopus and a type of snail, so not kosher, strictly speaking. But, after extensive testing, these fish were determined free of radiation and thus fit for consumption. Other fish, of the more kosher variety, are expected to be available soon, but there are still concerns about radiation.

And, of course, there was the big fuss last week over Hebrew National Hot Dogs, which are actually labeled kosher, but, apparently, are not. As it turns out, ConAgra employees who process the meat have been complaining that the meat involved doesn’t actually meet kosher standards. Now Hebrew National’s new “higher authority” is a federal court in Minnesota where the company is being tried for misleading customers and misrepresenting their product. So even food that we think is fit to eat, might not be kosher.

Posted on June 26, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Privacy Policy