Monthly Archives: January 2012

Game Day Snacks: “Marry Me” Brisket Sliders

Yield:
3 dozen


I know everyone is gearing up for Superbowl watching in less than a week, and so I’ve been preparing some killer recipes to include on your game day menu. You can also check out my recipes for Chicken Wings Two Ways, which are also sure to please.

We recently served these brisket sliders for a holiday party and they were a HUGE hit. In truth, this is an adaptation of my Uncle David’s famous brisket, which always disappears at the holidays. Why are they called “Marry Me” Brisket Sliders? Well, if you serve this treat to your intended, you are sure to win them over once and for all.

Now in terms of the slider buns, I know this can be a bit tricky so here are my suggestions:

BUY ‘EM: Some kosher butchers and even supermarkets sell mini hamburger buns or sliders buns, and if so, this is clearly the easiest option! Check stores early because I am sure sliders are a popular treat for superbowl watchers everywhere.

FAKE ‘EM: Can’t find slider buns and don’t feel like making them? You can either buy hamburger buns and using a round cookie cutter make mini buns, or buy hot dog buns or other longer rolls, and cut into pieces to the slider size of your choosing.

MAKE ‘EM: Feeling ambitious and want to wow your friends? Prepare your favorite challah dough recipe and let rise per usual. Cut dough into 2.5 ounce pieces, and fold into challah knots. Glaze with egg wash and sprinkle with thick sea salt and/or sesame seeds. Bake around 13-15 minutes at 350 degrees.

Marry Me Brisket Sliders

Ingredients

1 2-3 lb brisket

1 Tbsp salt

½ Tbsp freshly ground black pepper

2 tsp garlic powder

2 tsp onion powder

1 tsp dried parsley

3-4 Tbsp olive oil

1 can of beer

1 can of ginger ale

1 bottle of red wine

4 ounces of tomato paste

4 medium carrots, cut into medium size pieces

2 onions, cut into quarters

Directions

In a small bowl combine salt, pepper, garlic powder, onion powder and parsley. Spread dry rub on both sides of brisket evenly. Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.

Heat the olive oil in a large dutch oven or pot on medium high heat. Sear the brisket on both sides “until the smoke detector goes off.” Remove meat and set aside.

Using the remaining oil and “good bits” on the bottom of the pan, sauté carrots and onions, scraping the bottom until the veggies are soft, about 8-10 minutes. Add the tomato paste and stir until thoroughly mixed.

Put the brisket back in the pan, and cover with the bottle of red wine, beer and ginger ale. Place the entire pot with brisket into the oven, and cook for at least three hours.

When the meat is fork tender, remove the meat and set aside on a large cutting board.

Let the sludge rise to the top of the pot liquid and skim it off. Strain out the carrots and onions and using a food processor, blend them with 1-2 cups of the cooking liquid, then return the blended mixture to the rest of the liquid and simmer to reduce slightly.

On the cutting board using two forks, carefully shred the brisket into small strands. Add liquid to your taste and serve brisket on rolls of your choice.

Posted on January 29, 2012

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Shabbat Recipe Roundup: Dairy Edition!

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I much prefer making dairy meals over meat meals, and making a dairy Shabbat dinner can be a fun change every once in awhile.

When the rare dairy Shabbat dinner occurs, my way to start a meal is simply with some nice quality butter, thick sea salt and fresly baked challah. Mmmmm.

You can also try Pinch My Salt’s Baked White Bean Dip with Rosemary and Parmesan, which I would serve with slices of crusty baguette, or some crispy crostini.

For a great, dairy-friendly main dish, try the Barefoot Contessa’s Panko Crusted Salmon, which is both simple to make, and delicious.

I have been drooling over this rich Gnocchi Gratin with Gorgonzola Dolce. If you can’t find a kosher gorgonzola, I am certain another sharper cheese such as gruyere would also work in the dish.

If you decide to make a heavy dish such as the gratin, I would choose a light salad such as this Argula Salad with Lemon Vinaigrette to serve alongside.

For a sweet, decadent yet make-ahead dessert, try my favorite recipe for Apple Pie with Cheddar Crust. Serve with vanilla ice cream or fresh whipped cream.

Shabbat Shalom and happy cooking!

 

 

Posted on January 25, 2012

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Pork: The Other Medicinal Remedy?

I’m not much of a pill popper, and am typically happy to explore alternative ways to solve (minor) physical ailments. In fact, my husband is constantly teasing that my family’s remedy for any ailment is simply to drink more water, or have a cup of tea.

Well a new study as reported recently by The Guardian cites “nasal packing” with pork as a legitimate option for stopping chronic nosebleeds. What is nasal packing with pork and why would anyone do this?

Ian Humphreys, Sonal Saraiya, Walter Belenky and James Dworkin treated a girl who had a rare hereditary disorder that brings prolongued bleeding..they pack the essential details into two sentences: “Cured salted pork crafted as a nasal tampon and packed within the nasal vaults successfully stopped nasal hemorrhage promptly, effectively, and without sequelae … To our knowledge, this represents the first description of nasal packing with strips of cured pork for treatment of life-threatening hemorrhage. They acknowledge a long tradition of using pork to treat general epistaxis, ie nosebleed. The technique fell into disuse, they speculate, because “packing with salt pork was fraught with bacterial and parasitic complication.

I won’t even get into whether or not its permissable or “kosher” to use a pork product to stop a nosebleed. But I will say that packing my nose with pork is one alternative medicine I’m not quite ready to give a whirl. Would you?

Posted on January 25, 2012

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Phone Off – Or Pay Up!

These days it’s not uncommon to look up during a meal at a restaurant and discover an entire table full of fellow diners, engrossed not in conversation or eating, but rather with their cell phones. I myself have the unsavory habit of checking my phone occasionally when I am out with people, although I do try to keep it to a minimum. But I can say quite confidently that going out to dinner with my husband is like serving as the third wheel on a date with him, and his blackberry.

However, fellow blogger Brian Perez has come up with a clever solution: a dining “game” called phone stacking.

When everybody arrives and sits down to eat, each person places his or her phone face-down or stacks it on a pile in the middle of the table. The first person to look at his or her phone has to pay the bill. If the bill comes before any phones are checked, everyone wins and pays for their own meal. One food blogger calls it “one of the coolest pieces of socially engineered live gaming I’ve ever heard of.”

So, if the next time you’re eating out with your friends or partner and they whip out their phone, perhaps suggest a friendly game of phone stacking: loser pays all.

Posted on January 23, 2012

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Shabbat Recipe Roundup

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For some of us, this week marked the first snow, and the first legitimately cold week of the winter. In honor of the dropping tempature and falling snow,  I’ve put together some recipes for your Shabbat dinner that are sure to keep you warm and satisfied.

This Black Forest Challah with Chocolate and Cherries from The Challah Blog is so decadent, it could almost be dessert – but why not serve it first anyways. If you want to serve a chocolate and cherry dessert, you can try my Updated Oatmeal Cookies, which similarly combines the tartness of dried cherries with semi-sweet chocolate chips.

I love serving hummus, challah and veggies to start my Shabbat meals, but sometimes I want something a bit different, such as this Artichoke Hummus from Pinch My Salt.

Nothing says winter comfort food like beef stew or braised short ribs, so what better to serve for a hearty Shabbat dinner other than a perfect combo of Short Rib Stew. I love serving stews such as this over wide egg noodles.

Peanut butter and chocolate – is there any better way to end a meal!? I am drooling over these Peanut Butter Crunchies from Can’t Stop Baking, and think they look like a perfect, sweet bite to end a winter meal.

Happy cooking, and Shabbat Shalom!

 

 

 

Posted on January 19, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Watch That Kugel


Sometimes at the end of a long day I just want to go home and watch a nice looking man make me a kugel. My boyfriend’s out of town tonight, so I guess it’s just me and Dave Lieberman and some egg noodles. I might even go crazy and try making this.

Posted on January 18, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Q&A with Kosher Sweet Genius Paula Shoyer

Yield:
Serves 12 to 15


A few months ago, I had the pleasure to, quite literally, sit at the same table with Chef Paula Shoyer during a kosher food bloggers social media dinner. Nope, folks – I can’t even make this stuff up. Paula Shoyer is the author of The Kosher Baker, and most recently was featured as a contestant on the Food Network’s Sweet Genius!

I absolutely fell in love with Paula’s attitude for quality kosher food and expertise in pareve desserts. I had the chance to chat with her recently, and am now even more enamored. Anyone who “dreams of pareve dulce de leche” is a cook after my own heart. My favorite quote from her? “At a minimum, desserts must always be worth the calories or do not bother eating them.” Couldn’t agree more.

What has inspired your passion for baking and waist-friendly kosher cooking?

My grandmother was a fabulous baker and my book is dedicated to her memory.  I am always looking for ways to make my desserts healthier.  At a minimum, desserts must always be worth the calories or do not bother eating them.

What meal or dessert does your family ask you to make more than anything else? What is your favorite thing to make? Least?

My family loves when we have burritos during the week.  I make a black bean chili, rice, guacamole and salad and everyone makes their own.  My four kids always want there to be rolls of my double chocolate chip cookie dough in the freezer so they can slice and bake when they want.  My favorite desserts to make are the fancy French desserts with layers of cakes and creams and glazes, yet my favorite desserts to eat are the simpler ones such as scones.  I love my scones. I can’t say there is any food or dessert I don’t like to make.

Which ingredient do you wish you could find kosher?

The ingredients I wish I could find pareve are a healthier pareve whipping cream and dolce de leche.  I dream of pareve dolce de leche.

It’s been a crazy week, and you haven’t even given thought about what to make for Shabbat Dinner – what’s your go-to meal?

Beef Barley Soup, Garlic Chicken, rice, string beans with garlic, Orange Tea Cake (cover recipe from The Kosher Baker)

If you could only give one tip to a fellow kosher food enthusiast, what would it be?

Make homemade desserts – they are delicious and significantly healthier than packaged and even bakery desserts.

What’s next for Chef Paula Shoyer: Any more TV appearances? A new cookbook?

I am hoping for more TV appearances around Passover.  I do have an idea for a great TV show. The next book is The Passover Baker and I am busy creating recipes people have never seen on Passover before such as black and white cookies.

Paula's Pumpkin Bread

Ingredients

  • Spray oil containing flour or spray oil plus 2
  • tablespoons flour for greasing and flouring pan
  • ½ cup canola oil
  • ¾ cup sugar
  • ¼ cup honey
  • 1 cup canned pumpkin purée (not pumpkin pie filling)
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • ½ cup whole wheat flour
  • ½ cup spelt flour
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • ½  teaspoon ground cloves
  • ½ teaspoon fresh ground nutmeg

Directions

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Grease and flour a Bundt or tube pan.

In a large bowl, beat the oil, sugar and honey with a stand or hand-held electric mixer on medium-high speed until mixed. Add the pumpkin purée and beat again.

Use a silicone spatula to scrape down the bowl. Add the vanilla and eggs and mix well. Add the white, wheat and spelt flours, salt, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, ginger, cloves, and nutmeg.  Mix all the ingredients together. Use a silicone spatula to scoop the batter into the pan and then smooth the top.

Bake for 45 minutes, or until a skewer inserted comes out clean.

Let cool for 10  minutes in the pan and then turn out onto a rack and let cool completely.

Posted on January 17, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Game Day Snacks: Chicken Wings Two Ways

Yield:
2 dozen wings


It seems we are in the final month of American Football season, concluding with the SuperBowl in a few weeks. Confession: I know absolutely nothing about football, and I am just fine with that. But I do love traditional Sunday football “fare,” and so for the next few weeks I’ll be providing my husband’s favorite recipes that go along with good game watching

Up first: my fried chicken wings, two ways.

If you don’t have a proper deep fryer, of course you can bake the chicken wings before saucing them. You can also fill a large pot with oil and use that for frying.

Traditional-Style Hot Wings

  • vegetable oil for frying
  • 2 dozen chicken wings
  • 3/4 cup pareve margarine or butter flavored shortening
  • 3/4 hot sauce of your choice
  • 1 Tbsp salt
  • 1/2 Tbsp black pepper
  • celery sticks for garnish

Rinse chicken wings in cold water, and pat dry thoroughly.

In a deep fryer or large pot, heat oil to 375 degrees. Fry wings in oil for approximately 12-15 minutes, until just crispy.

Meanwhile, heat margarine and hot sauce in a saucepan on medium heat. Whisk until heated through and smooth. Pour sauce into a large mixing bowl, add salt and pepper.

When wings are done, add wings to large bowl and toss to sauce. Add celery sticks for garnish, and serve.

 

Sweet N Spicy Asian Chicken Wings

Ingredients

 

  • oil for frying
  • 2 dozen chicken wings
  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • 2 Tbsp sriracha sauce
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 1 Tbsp sesame oil
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 3 scallions, chopped (green and white parts)

Directions

Rinse chicken wings in cold water, and pat dry thoroughly.

In a deep fryer or large pot, heat oil to 375 degrees. Fry wings in oil for approximately 12-15 minutes, until just crispy.

Meanwhile, heat soy sauce, sriracha, honey, sesame oil and garlic in a saucepan on medium heat. Whisk until heated through and smooth. Bring to a boil and let reduce slightly, just 2-3 minutes. Pour sauce into a large mixing bowl.

When wings are done, add them to the large bowl and then toss to cover with sauce. Garnish with chopped scallions and serve.

Posted on January 15, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Contest: Win Kosher By Design Lightens Up!

New Years has come and gone, but we’re still firmly in the midst of resolution season. If, like my own husband, you’re trying to make healthier choices and whittle your waistline a bit – we’d want to help!

We have one copy of Susie Fishbein’s Kosher By Design Lightens Up to give away! I’m really enjoying this cookbook  – everything from the Huevos Rancheros (one of my breakfast favorites), to lightened versions of some traditional Jewish staples, like Deli Roll and Potato Kugel.

So here’s the deal: comment below with your favorite “lightening up” tip or recipe, and the best one will win our copy of Kosher By Design Lightens Up.

 

Posted on January 13, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

Shabbat Recipe Roundup

Shabbat is here, and time to plan your meals! While some of you might be trying to lighten your cooking these days in honor of the New Year, I know a lot of you are not. So for the non-calorie counting cooks out there, this week’s Shabbat Recipe Roundup is for you.

I saw this recipe for Lemony Chickpea Bruscetta, and my interest was immediately piqued. I would definitely use canned chickpeas instead of dried chickpeas to save myself an extra step and serve it with a large crusty baguette.

What a fantastically easy and healthful one pot dish for an easy Shabbat main dish: Roasted Chicken Legs with Potatoes and Kale.

But if you’re looking for something a little more ambitious or adventurous – try this kosher version of Julia Child’s Boeuf Bourguignon from The Jew and the Carrot which I cannot wait to try! Any recipe that encourages the use of schmaltz is truly a recipe for me. Julia may not approve, but I would serve this over wide egg noodles. Yum.

In the spirit of hearty dishes and schmaltz, I am salivating over this recipe for Duck Fat Potato Galette with Caraway and Sweet Onions.

And for a sweet finish, try these chewy and flavorful Triple Ginger Cookies.

Shabbat Shalom, and happy cooking!

Posted on January 11, 2012

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

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