Author Archives: Adeena Sussman

The Inspired Kitchen

This entry was posted in Holidays on by .

Lasagna for Passover? You bet. After days of preparing two (probably meat-based) seders, this dairy dish will be a welcome change–especially on a holiday where pasta is strictly forbidden. Matzah makes a suitable replacement for lasagna noodles, and the moisture released by the marinara sauce and the cheese softens the stiff, unleavened boards, resulting in a tender lasagna with layers just as delicious as one made with conventional, wheat-based noodles. More…

Posted on April 17, 2008

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The Inspired Kitchen

This entry was posted in Culture, Holidays on by .

Purim is a merrymaking holiday with many food-related traditions, including giving mishloach manot to family and friends and eating triangular-shaped hamantaschen. But beyond these better-known customs lies one with a lower profile, the eating of beans.

Bean and chick-pea dishes are typically served at the festive meal on Purim day to evoke Queen Esther’s diet while in the court of King Ahasuerus, where the midrash relates that she ate only beans to avoid non-kosher fare. Legumes are also a traditional food for mourners–some suggest that Esther consumed them when she heard of Haman’s plan for the Jewish people. More…

Posted on March 13, 2008

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The Inspired Kitchen

This entry was posted in Culture on by .

Za’atar, a spice blend popular throughout the Middle East, is ideally a blend of hyssop, sumac, sesame seeds, salt, and other seasonings. Jewish food historian and cookbook author Gil Marks notes that hyssop appears frequently in the Bible, playing an especially prominent role in the Passover story, where Jews were instructed to add hyssop to the blood they smeared on their doorposts. Sumac, the dried and ground red berry that lends za’atar its distinct tanginess, is referenced in the Talmud as a cultivated spice. More…

Posted on February 21, 2008

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The Inspired Kitchen

This entry was posted in Culture, Holidays on by .

Tu Bishvat–often known as the Jewish New Year for trees–celebrates the coming of spring and the seven species of fruits, vegetables, and grains known to have flourished during Biblical times in Israel. With a bounty of tempting options among the seven–barley, wheat, olives, pomegranates, figs, grapes, and dates–it’s easy to be inspired. More

Posted on January 22, 2008

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The Inspired Kitchen

This entry was posted in Culture, Holidays on by .

Eating fried foods is one of the distinct pleasures of Hanukkah, and the tradition behind it is well-known. According to legend, after the temple was ransacked by Antiochus’ troops, a small vial of undefiled oil miraculously lasted for 8 days, until more oil could be found. More…

Posted on December 6, 2007

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The Inspired Kitchen

This entry was posted in Culture on by .

A few years ago, signs began popping up around Tel Aviv and beyond advertising a new delicacy: sabich. This savory combination of fried eggplant, hard-boiled egg, hummus, Israeli salad, and assorted condiments is stuffed into a pita and drizzled with tahini sauce and amba, a mango pickle similar to the chutneys found in Indian cuisine. The dish is now a favorite all over Israel. More…

Posted on November 21, 2007

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Recipe: Braised Fennel with Raisins and Pine Nuts

This entry was posted in Culture on by .

It’s a little-known fact that many of the mainstays of Italian cuisine were in fact introduced by the Jewish community that has inhabited Rome for over 2,000 years. Vegetables such as artichokes and eggplant were ignored ingredients until they were noticed in the Cucina Hebraica (Jewish kitchen). More…

Posted on October 25, 2007

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Recipe: Sweet & Savory Stuffed Prunes

This entry was posted in Culture, Holidays on by .

The holiday of Sukkot is associated with the fall harvest, and serving stuffed foods is a symbolic and flavorful way to represent the bounty of the season.

A departure from more traditional stuffed foods, these stuffed prunes combine sweet and savory, and make a wonderful start to a festive meal.

MORE…

Posted on September 26, 2007

Note: The opinions expressed here are the personal views of the author. All comments on MyJewishLearning are moderated. Any comment that is offensive or inappropriate will be removed. Privacy Policy

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